Great Lakes Protection Grant Program, Rolling Deadline

The Fund welcomes preproposals for projects that identify a specific improvement to the health of the Great Lakes ecosystem and have a pragmatic plan to produce those improvements. The Fund supports projects that produce results for the entire basin ecosystem, are carried out by collaborative teams, and tackle issues that have not generally been addressed at basin scale.

Such issues presently include:

Additional projects are sought to expand work in these areas.

All ideas are welcome, provided that they are consistent with the Fund’s general funding guidelines. Click here to learn more about our general funding guidelines.

Support can be in the form of grants, loans, program related investments, or other investment mechanisms. The Fund can support a wide array of project ideas are welcome and preproposals may be submitted at any time.

All proposed projects must meet certain guidelines to be eligible for funding. The ultimate criterion used to select projects is the anticipated benefit to the health of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Projects must identify a significant, tangible ecological outcome and a pragmatic plan to achieve it. Proposals should identify the expected outcome of the work to be undertaken as precisely as possible. Additional project design resources are available on our web site.

Projects must also lead to benefits for the entire Great Lakes ecosystem. The Fund prefers to support projects that take concrete actions to achieve basin-wide ecological results. Support for activities such as conferences, environmental education, and basic scientific or policy research will be considered for support only when they are part of a broader, regional action strategy that is designed to impact the entire ecosystem.

Projects must supplement existing efforts to protect and restore the health of the Great Lakes ecosystem. The Fund will not support projects that duplicate ongoing initiatives or replace government funds.

The Fund also considers the following principles when evaluating requests for support:

  • Projects should be driven by environmental results, take concrete actions and have system-wide impact.
  • Projects should be collaborative in nature and create partnerships that reflect the range of interests in the Great Lakes basin.
  • Projects should anticipate and prevent impacts on the health of the ecosystem, rather than attempt to correct environmental problems only after they have occurred.
  • Projects should develop solutions that improve both the environmental and economic health of the basin ecosystem. The Fund is interested in supporting efforts that promote both environmental and economic sustainability.
  • Projects must be based on sound science, should utilize the results of existing research, and apply the skills of the basin’s scientific community. Just as the Fund will not support basic research that is not a part of an action strategy, the Fund will not support actions that are not based in rigorous, scientific analysis.
  • The Fund does not provide general operating support and does not support lobbying or litigation.

The Great Lakes Protection Fund can support a wide variety of applicants. Non-profit organizations (including environmental organizations, trade associations, and universities), for-profit businesses, government agencies, and individuals are eligible for Fund support. Successful applicants must maintain open access to certain project data, records, and information.

All applicants must comply with the Fund’s general funding guidelines, show that the proposed work has clear public benefit and that any related financial benefits will accrue to the public good. Government agencies must show that Fund support is not being used to replace or duplicate public funds.

Refer also to frequently asked questions about our Funding Guidelines.

Source – http://www.glpf.org/

Great Lakes Protection Grant Program, Rolling Deadline

Rural Community Development Initiatives Grants, Due Dec. 22

Grants to develop the capacity and ability of nonprofit organizations, low-income rural communities, or federally recognized tribes to undertake projects related to housing, community facilities, or community and economic development in rural areas.

Eligible Applicants

  • City or township governments
  • State governments
  • Special district governments
  • Independent school districts
  • Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
  • Private institutions of higher education
  • County governments
  • Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
  • Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
  • For profit organizations other than small businesses
  • Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)

Estimated Total Program Funding:

  • $6,256,000
  • Award Ceiling:   $300,000
  • Award Floor:      $50,000

The Intermediary will be required to provide matching funds in an amount at least equal to the RCDI grant. The respective minumum and maximum grant amount per Intermediary is $50,000.00 and $300,000.00. The Recipient, but not the Intermediary, must be located in a city or town that has a population of less than 50,000 inhabitants.

Fund uses must be consistent with the RCDI purpose. A nonexclusive list of eligible grant uses includes the following:

  1. Provide technical assistance to develop recipients’ capacity and ability to undertake projects related to housing, community facilities, or community and economic development, i.e., the intermediary hires a staff person to provide technical assistance to the recipient or the recipient hires a staff person, under the supervision of the intermediary, to carry out the technical assistance provided by the intermediary.
  2. Develop the capacity of recipients to conduct community development programs, e.g.,  homeownership education or training for business entrepreneurs.
  3. Develop the capacity of recipients to conduct development initiatives, e.g., programs that support micro-enterprise and sustainable development.
  4. Develop the capacity of recipients to increase their leveraging ability and access to alternative funding sources by providing training and staffing.
  5. Develop the capacity of recipients to provide the technical assistance component for essential community facilities projects.
  6. Assist recipients in completing predevelopment requirements for housing, community facilities, or community and economic development projects by providing resources for professional services, e.g., architectural, engineering, or legal.
  7. Improve recipient’s organizational capacity by providing training and resource material on developing strategic plans, board operations, management, financial systems, and information technology.
  8. Purchase of computers, software, and printers, limited to $10,000 per award, at the recipient level when directly related to the technical assistance program being undertaken by the intermediary.
  9. Provide funds to recipients for training-related travel costs and training expenses related to RCDI.

Ineligible Fund Uses

  1. Pass-through grants, capacity grants, and any funds provided to the recipient in a lump sum that are not reimbursements.
  2. Funding a revolving loan fund (RLF).
  3. Construction (in any form).
  4. Salaries for positions involved in construction, renovations, rehabilitation, and any oversight of these types of activities.
  5. Intermediary preparation of strategic plans for recipients.
  6. Funding prostitution, gambling, or any illegal activities.
  7. Grants to individuals.
  8. Funding a grant where there may be a conflict of interest, or an appearance of a conflict of interest, involving any action by the Agency.
  9. Paying obligations incurred before the beginning date without prior Agency approval or after the ending date of the grant agreement.
  10. Purchasing real estate.
  11. Improvement or renovation of the grantee’s, or recipient’s office space or for the repair or  maintenance of privately owned vehicles.
  12. Any other purpose prohibited in 7 CFR parts 3015, 3016, and 3019, as applicable.
  13. Using funds for recipient’s general operating costs.

Contact us for more information!

Rural Community Development Initiatives Grants, Due Dec. 22

Brownfield Grants Available, Deadline October 15

Site Assessment and Planning Grants

Funding: $200,000 for hazardous substances, and $200,000 for petroleum Application

This grant provides funds to inventory, characterize, assess, and conduct planning (including cleanup planning) and community involvement related to brownfield sites. There are three types of site assessment applications:

1. Site-specific assessment grants: an application can be submitted for one property. Applicants can request a maximum of $200,000 for hazardous substance site assessment or $200,000 for petroleum site assessment or $200,000 for combined hazardous substance/petroleum site assessment.

2. Community-wide assessment grants: an application can be submitted for brownfield sites throughout a community (such as a village, city, or County. Applicants can request a maximum of $200,000 for hazardous substance site assessment and $200,000 for petroleum site assessment for a combined total of $400,000.

3. Coalition assessment grants: an application can be submitted for brownfield sites throughout a community or region, depending on the coalition partners. A maximum of $1 million combined hazardous substance and petroleum site assessment funds are available. Coalition partners must be distinct legal entities.

Brownfield Revolving Fund Grants

Funding: up to $1 million

This grant provides funding for a grant recipient to capitalize a revolving fund and to make loans and provide subgrants to carry out cleanup activities at brownfield sites.

Brownfield Cleanup Grants

This grant provides funds to carry out cleanup activities at a specific brownfield site owned by the applicant. A maximum of three sites can be cleaned up. Each site must be applied for separately.

Contact us for more information!

Brownfield Grants Available, Deadline October 15

MDNRE Grants Announced

Applications Sought for $4 Million in Water Quality Improvement Grants

The Department of Natural Resources and Environment is now accepting proposals for projects to restore and protect Michigan’s wetlands, lakes and streams. Approximately $4 million in state and federal funding is available for watershed-based projects. State and local units of government, nonprofit organizations and universities may apply.

The funding opportunities include:

Clean Michigan Initiative – Nonpoint Source Pollution Control Grants

Approximately $1 million is anticipated to be available to implement elements of watershed management plans that have been approved by the DNRE as meeting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency criteria. Proposals must include a minimum of 25 percent local match.

Federal Clean Water Act

Approximately $3 million is anticipated to be available to develop watershed management plans meeting the DNRE and the U.S. EPA criteria, or to implement elements of watershed management plans previously approved as meeting the U.S. EPA criteria. Proposals must include a minimum of 15 percent local match for planning or 25 percent local match for implementation.

Notices of Intent are due Sept. 16, 2010. Full applications from invited entities are due Oct. 25, 2010.

MDNRE Grants Announced