Wildflower Planting Grants, Due December 4

Source: The Wildflower Assn of Michigan, Photo: Otsego Conservation District

The Wildflower Association of Michigan, in a partnership with the Harold & Jean Glassen Foundation, awards grants annually to fund projects involving the creation of an outdoor classroom, the enhancing of an existing site, or other educationally directed projects that support the WAM Mission. It is our goal to reach as many of Michigan’s youth and citizenry as possible through the use of our grant program. It is our desire not only to educate Michigan’s students in the areas of recognition, preservation and proper procedures for the repopulating of endangered, threatened and/or special concern native species, but also projects that pass on the appreciation and respect for our native flora that will ensure survival of these species in the future.

Please review the criteria for application to this year’s grant program as well as the summarization of the follow-up procedures and reports required of all recipients of WAM awards. Please review this document carefully prior to completing your application form. Review of this information may prove of value in the approach your group will take in designing your project and application. Please note in particular the deadlines and signatures required for each application. Improperly submitted applications will not be considered for funding.

Since it is WAM’s desire to be of service to as much of the public as possible, all grant recipients will receive packets of information to assist them in fulfillment of their projects. Included for your use is a list of sources for educational materials, a list of Michigan native species nurseries and seed suppliers, additional grant dollar sources, and other selected reading materials.

Thanks to the generous monetary support of the Harold and Jean Glassen Memorial Foundation, WAM is pleased to announce that it has a total of $5000 available for allocations in this year’s grant program. Each applicant may request up to $500 in support. The application deadline is December 4, 2010. All applicants will be notified if they are or are not recipients of an award no later than January 30, 2011. Awardees will receive their funds at the Awards Luncheon on Sunday during the Michigan Wildflower Conference at the Kellogg Center on the Michigan State University campus. If you have any further questions pertaining to the grant application process please contact Robert Krueger, Grants Coordinator, at the address below. Electronic submission (e-mail) is encouraged. Please do not fax your application. Good luck and thank you for your interest in WAM’s Glassen Educational Grant Program.

More information on native plants is available from your local conservation district.

Grand Traverse County Soil Conservation District

 

Wildflower Planting Grants, Due December 4

Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act, Due Dec. 13

The Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act Grant Program provides federal grants on a competitive basis to states, tribes and other interested entities to encourage cooperative conservation, restoration and management of fish and wildlife resources and their habitat in the Great Lakes basin. The projects are funded under authority of the Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act of 2006.

Fiscal Year 2011 Request for Proposals Announced

News Release – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) it is accepting 2011 project proposals to protect, restore and enhance Great Lakes fish and wildlife habitat under the Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act (Act).

The Service requests interested entities to submit restoration, research and Regional Project proposals for the restoration of Great Lakes fish and wildlife resources.  The purpose of the Act is to provide assistance to States, Indian Tribes, and other interested entities to encourage cooperative conservation, restoration and management of the fish and wildlife resources and their habitats in the Great Lakes Basin.  Supported in part by President Obama’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, a total of approximately $2.0 million is projected to be available to support projects this fiscal year.  Deadline for proposal submission is December 13, 2010.

The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) requests interested entities to submit restoration, research and Regional Project proposals for the restoration of Great Lakes fish and wildlife resources, as authorized under the Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act (16 USC 941c). The purpose of the Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act (Act) is to provide assistance to States, Indian Tribes, and other interested entities to encourage cooperative conservation, restoration and management of the fish and wildlife resources and their habitats in the Great Lakes Basin. Regional Projects are authorized activities of the Service related to fish and wildlife resource protection, restoration, maintenance, and enhancement impacting the resources of multiple States or Indian Tribes with fish and wildlife management authority in the Great Lakes Basin. The Service will be responsible for accomplishing Regional Projects on behalf of the State and/or Tribal agencies submitting the Regional Project proposal. Supported in part by President Obama’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, a total of approximately $2.0 million is projected to be available to support projects this fiscal year. Available funding and project awards are subject to final Congressional appropriations for Fiscal Year 2011. Up to 33% of the total Congressional appropriation to the Act is eligible to fund Regional Projects. Successful restoration and research projects have ranged from $2,300 to $2,000,000 with the average project at $97,286.

Eligible Applicants

State governments
County governments
City or township governments
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Private institutions of higher education
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Additional Information on Eligibility:

States, Federally Recognized Indian Tribal Governments, and Native American Treaty Organizations within the Great Lakes Basin are eligible. Local governments, non-governmental organizations, universities, and conservation organizations (either within or outside of the basin) may receive funding if sponsored by an institution listed above. Proof of sponsorship is not required at the pre-proposal stage, but is required during the review of full proposals to receive funding.

Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act, Due Dec. 13

Clean Diesel Grants, Deadline Nov 29

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment (DNRE) is pleased to announce the availability of its 2010-2011 Request for Projects (RFP) for the State Clean Diesel Grant Program. Interested parties should visit the Michigan Clean Diesel Initiative (MiCDI) website to obtain a copy of the RFP and supporting application materials.

Approximately $1 million in grant funding is available for this RFP competition. Applicants are encouraged to apply for grant funds from municipalities, townships, and villages, county and non-profit agencies, school districts, municipal planning organizations and private industry. Projects must be located in one or more of 30 Michigan counties where implementation of diesel engine emissions reduction projects would be most beneficial.

All projects must utilize EPA- or California Air Resources Board-verified technology solutions, which include anti-idling and retrofit equipment, aerodynamic technologies, and engine, vehicle and equipment upgrades or replacements. The type of diesel engine fleets covered under this RFP include: school buses; medium and heavy duty trucks; buses, and marine, agricultural, energy production, mining and construction vehicles, and equipment.

This solicitation will be open for a period of 60 days, and completed applications, along with supporting materials are due back to the DNRE’s Office of Pollution Prevention and Compliance Assistance (OPPCA) on Monday, Nov. 29, 2010, 5 p.m. EST. Applications that are late will not be accepted and applications that are on time, but not in the required format or those that are not complete will not receive consideration. Please note that project proposals and applications will be not be accepted by FAX or e-mail.

Clean Diesel Grants, Deadline Nov 29

Library Grants, Deadline Nov 15

The IMLS Sparks! Ignition Grants for Libraries and Museums are a new IMLS funding opportunity within the National Leadership Grants program. These grants encourage libraries, archives, and museums to challenge existing assumptions about how they operate and the services they provide. These small grants support the deployment, testing, and evaluation of promising and groundbreaking new tools, products, services, or organizational practices. Applicants may propose activities or approaches that involve risk, as long as the risk is balanced by significant potential for improvement in the ways cultural heritage institutions serve their communities.

Successful proposals will address problems, challenges, or needs of broad relevance to libraries, archives, and/or museums, will test innovative responses to these problems, and will make the findings of these tests widely and openly accessible. To maximize the benefit of federal investments, the Sparks! Ignition Grants for Libraries and Museums will fund projects with the following characteristics:

  • Broad Potential Impact—Applicants should identify a specific problem or need that is important to many libraries, archives, and/or museums, and propose a testable and measurable solution to the problem. Proposals must demonstrate a thorough understanding of current issues and practices in the project’s focus area and discuss the project’s potential impact within libraries, archives, and/or museums. Proposed innovations should be widely adoptable or adaptable.
  • Significant Innovation—The proposed solution to the identified problem must offer strong potential for non-incremental, significant advancement in the operation of libraries, archives, and/or museums. Applicants must explain how the proposed activity differs from current practices or exploits an unexplored opportunity, and the potential benefit to be gained by this innovation.

Institutions of all sizes and types are encouraged to develop projects that meet the specific needs of their counterparts across the country. Examples of projects that might be funded by this program include, but are not limited to:

  • exploring the potential of highly original, experimental collaborations,
  • implementing new workflows or processes with potential for substantial cost savings,
  • testing new metrics or methods to measure the impact of promising tools or services,
  • rapid prototyping and testing of new types of software tools, or creating useful new ways to link separate software applications used in libraries, archives, or museums,
  • offering innovative new types of services or new service options to library, archive, or museum visitors, or
  • enhancing institutions’ abilities to interact with audiences in new ways to promote learning or improve services, such as through the deployment of innovative crowd-sourcing techniques.

Grant funding for such activities may include all activities associated with planning, deploying, and evaluating the innovation, as long as the expense is allowable under federal and IMLS regulations and guidelines. Sparks! Ignition Grant funds may not be used for:

  • evaluation of an existing program or service,
  • projects that are only for planning,
  • projects that are only for research (as distinguished from experimentation),
  • projects that are limited to existing and traditional approaches to exhibitions, performances, or other types of public programs,
  • projects that involve mainly digitization, unless the applicant is proposing an innovative method for digitization,
  • activities that will produce only incremental improvements in operational or business processes,
  • support of conferences or professional meetings, or
  • acquisition of equipment in excess of 50 percent of the total funds requested from IMLS.

The Sparks! Ignition Grants intentionally are designed to foster broad sharing of information about project findings. Successful proposals are expected to include innovative and well-rounded communication plans that exploit multiple media and technologies to share project information with targeted audiences. Additionally, grant recipients at the end of the project will be required to submit a five- to ten-page white paper that IMLS will disseminate widely. This paper will describe the identified problem or need, original project goals, and the innovation tested, and report the findings and lessons learned through the activity. Grant recipients also will be expected to participate in a January 2012 online discussion among all the 2011 Sparks! Ignition Grants awardees.

Award Amounts
Sparks! Ignition Grants range from $10,000 to $25,000. IMLS will review and negotiate budgets as necessary. IMLS may award an amount less than that requested by an applicant. If IMLS funding is requested for salaries of permanent staff, the proposal should explain how their regular duties will be performed during the grant period.

Eligibility for Libraries and Archives

An eligible applicant must be:

  1. either a unit of state or local government or a private nonprofit organization that has tax-exempt status under the Internal Revenue Code;
  2. located in one of the 50 states of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, or the Republic of Palau; and
  3. one of the six types of organizations listed below:
    • a library or a parent organization, such as a school district, a municipality, a state agency, or an academic institution, that is responsible for the administration of a library. Eligible libraries include public libraries, elementary and secondary school libraries, college and university libraries, research libraries and archives that are not an integral part of an institution of higher education and that make publicly available library services and materials that are suitable for scholarly research and not otherwise available,1 and private or special libraries that have been deemed eligible to participate in this program by the state in which the library is located,
    • an academic or administrative unit, such as a graduate school of library and information science that is part of an institution of higher education through which it would make application,
    • a digital library, if it makes library materials publicly available and provides library services, including selection, organization, description, reference, and preservation, under the supervision of at least one permanent professional staff librarian,
    • a library agency that is an official agency of a state or other unit of government and is charged by the law governing it with the extension and development of public library services within its jurisdiction,
    • a library consortium that is a local, statewide, regional, interstate, or international cooperative association of library entities that provides for the systematic and effective coordination of the resources of eligible libraries, as defined above, and information centers that work to improve the services delivered to the clientele of these libraries, or
    • a library association that exists on a permanent basis, serves libraries or library professionals on a national, regional, state, or local level, and engages in activities designed to advance the well-being of libraries and the library profession.

Eligibility for Museums

An eligible applicant must be:

  • either a unit of state or local government or a private nonprofit organization that has tax-exempt status under the Internal Revenue Code,
  • be located in one of the fifty states of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, or the Republic of Palau,
  • and qualify as one of the following three types of organizations:
  1. a museum2 that, using a professional staff,3
    • is organized on a permanent basis for essentially educational or aesthetic purposes;
    • owns or uses tangible objects, either animate or inanimate;
    cares for these objects; and
    • exhibits these objects to the general public on a regular basis through facilities that it owns or operates4.
  2. an organization or association that engages in activities designed to advance the well-being of museums and the museum profession,5 or
  3. an institution of higher education, including public and nonprofit universities.

Please note that a museum located within a parent organization that is a state or local government or multipurpose not-for-profit entity, such as a municipality, university, historical society, foundation, or cultural center, may apply on its own behalf if the museum (1) is able to independently fulfill all the eligibility requirements listed above , (2) functions as a discrete unit within the parent organization , (3) has its own fully segregated and itemized operating budget , and (4) has the authority to make the application on its own. When any of the last three conditions cannot be met, a museum may apply through its parent organization, and the parent organization may submit a single application for one or more of its museums.

Library Grants, Deadline Nov 15

EDA Public Works Funding, Rolling Deadlines

Under this announcement, EDA solicits applications for the following programs under PWEDA:

Public Works

EDA will provide Public Works investments to support the construction or rehabilitation of essential public infrastructure and facilities necessary to generate or retain private sector jobs and investments, attract private sector capital, and promote regional competitiveness, including investments that expand and upgrade infrastructure to attract new industry, support technology-led development, accelerate new business development, and enhance the ability of regions to capitalize on opportunities presented by free trade. The Gaylord Industrial Park, designed by GFA, was EDA funded.

Planning

The Planning Program helps support planning organizations, including District Organizations and Indian Tribes, in the development, implementation, revision or replacement of comprehensive economic development strategies (CEDS), and for related short-term planning investments and State plans designed to create and retain higher-skill, higher-wage jobs, particularly for the unemployed and underemployed in the nation’s most economically distressed regions.

Local Technical Assistance

The Local Technical Assistance Program helps fill the knowledge and information gaps that may prevent leaders in the public and nonprofit sectors in economically distressed regions from making optimal decisions on local economic development issues.

Economic Adjustment Assistance

The Economic Adjustment Assistance Program provides a wide range of technical, planning and infrastructure assistance in regions experiencing adverse economic changes that may occur suddenly or over time. This program is designed to respond flexibly to pressing economic recovery issues and is well suited to help address challenges faced by U.S. communities and regions.

Eligible Applicants:

  • County governments
  • City or township governments
  • Special district governments
  • Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
  • Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
  • Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
  • Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
  • Private institutions of higher education
  • Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)

Evaluation Criteria

  1. Be market-based and results driven. An EDA investment will capitalize on a region’s competitive strengths and will positively move a regional economic indicator, such as: an increased number of higher-skill, higher-wage jobs; increased tax revenue; or increased private sector investment resulting from the EDA investment.
  2. Have strong organizational leadership. An EDA investment will have strong leadership, relevant project management experience, and a significant commitment of human resources talent to ensure a project’s successful execution.
  3. Advance productivity, innovation and entrepreneurship. An EDA investment will enable entrepreneurship, enhance regional industry clusters, and leverage and link technology innovators and local universities to the private sector to create the conditions for greater productivity, innovation, and job creation.
  4. Look beyond the immediate economic horizon, anticipate economic changes, and diversify the local and regional economy. An EDA investment will be part of an overarching, long-term comprehensive economic development strategy that enhances a region’s success in achieving a rising standard of living by supporting existing industry clusters, developing emerging new clusters, or attracting new regional economic drivers.
  5. Demonstrate a high degree of local commitment by exhibiting: High levels of local government or non-profit matching share funds and private sector leverage; Clear and unified leadership and support by local elected officials; and Strong cooperation among the business sector, relevant regional partners and local, State and federal government

Funding Priorities

1) Investments in support of long-term, coordinated and collaborative regional economic development approaches:

  • Establish comprehensive regional economic development strategies that identify promising opportunities for long-term economic growth.
  • Exhibit demonstrable, committed multi-jurisdictional support from leaders across all sectors:
    • i. Public (e.g., mayors, city councils, county executives, senior state leadership);
    • ii. Institutional (e.g., institutions of higher learning);
    • iii. Non-profit (e.g., chambers of commerce, development organizations); and
    • iv. Private (e.g., leading regional businesses, significant regional industry associations).
    • Generate quantifiable positive economic outcomes.

2) Investments that support innovation and competitiveness:

  • Develop and enhance the functioning and competitiveness of leading and emerging industry clusters in an economic region.
  • Advance technology transfer from research institutions to the commercial marketplace.
  • Bolster critical infrastructure (e.g., transportation, communications, specialized training) to prepare economic regions to compete in the world-wide marketplace.

3) Investments that encourage entrepreneurship:

  • Cultivate a favorable entrepreneurial environment consistent with regional strategies.
  • Enable economic regions to identify innovative opportunities among growth-oriented small and medium-size enterprises.
  • Promote community and faith-based entrepreneurship programs aimed at improving economic performance in an economic region.

4) Investments in support of strategies that link regional economies with the global marketplace:

  • Enable businesses, local governments and key institutions (e.g., institutions of higher education) to understand and take advantage of the numerous free trade agreements.
  • Enable economic development professionals to develop and implement strategies that reflect the competitive environment of the 21st Century global marketplace.
  • Build strategies to help regional economies boost exports.
  • Promote foreign direct investment.

5) Additional considerations:

  • Respond to sudden and severe economic dislocations (e.g., major layoffs, plant closures or disasters).
  • Enable BRAC-impacted communities to transition from a military to civilian economy.
  • Advance the goals of linking historic preservation and economic development as outlined by Executive Order 13287, “Preserve America.”
  • Support the economic revitalization of brownfields.
  • Implement the Global Climate Change Mitigation Initiative as described in section II.A.5 of this FFO.

“Special Need” Criteria
The following criteria are published in accordance with 13 C.F.R. § 301.3(a)(1)(iii) and define what may constitute a “Special Need” (as defined in 13 C.F.R. § 300.3) sufficient to make a project eligible for Public Works or Economic Adjustment investment assistance, as described in section III.B. of this announcement. Only applications for Public Works or Economic Adjustment investment assistance may be found eligible under a “Special Need,” and EDA will determine the maximum allowable investment rates for such projects. The applicant will be asked to present appropriate economic or demographic statistics to demonstrate a “Special Need.”

A project is eligible pursuant to a “Special Need” if the project is located in a region that meets one of the criteria described below:

  1. Closure or restructuring of industrial firms or loss of a major employer essential to the regional economy. A region has experienced either:
  • an actual closure or restructuring of a firm(s) within the past 12 months prior to application, resulting in sudden job losses and meeting the following dislocation criteria; or
  • a threat of closure that results from a public announcement of an impending closure or restructuring of a firm(s) expected to occur within two years of application; AND
  • such actual or threatened closure results in sudden job losses meeting the following dislocation criteria:
  • i. For regions with a population of at least 100,000, the actual or threatened dislocation is 500 jobs, or one percent of the civilian labor force (CLF), whichever is less.
  • ii. For regions with a population up to 100,000, the actual or threatened dislocation is 200 jobs, or one percent of the CLF, whichever is less.
  1. Substantial out-migration or population loss. An applicant seeking eligibility under this criterion will be asked to present appropriate and compelling economic or demographic data to demonstrate the special need.
  2. Underemployment, meaning employment of workers at less than full-time or at less skilled tasks than their training or abilities permit. An applicant seeking eligibility under this criterion will be asked to present appropriate and compelling economic and demographic data to demonstrate the special need.
  3. Military base closures or realignments, defense contractor reductions-in-force, or Department of Energy defense-related funding reductions.
  4. A military base closure refers to a military base that was closed or is scheduled for closure or realignment pursuant to the base closure and realignment process or other Department of Defense (DOD) process. Unless further extended by the Assistant Secretary, the region is eligible from the date of DOD’s recommendation for closure until five years after the actual date of closing of the installation.
  5. A defense contractor reduction-in-force refers to a defense contractor(s) experiencing defense contract cancellations or reductions resulting from official DOD announcements and having aggregate value of at least $10 million per year. Actual dislocations must have occurred within one year of application to EDA and threatened dislocations must be anticipated to occur within two years of application to EDA. Defense contracts that expire in the normal course of business will not be considered to meet this criterion.
  6. A Department of Energy defense-related funding reduction refers to a Department of Energy facility that has experienced or will experience a reduction of employment resulting from its defense mission change. The area is eligible from the date of the Department of Energy announcement of reductions until five years after the actual date of reduced operations at the installation.
  7. Natural or other major disasters or emergencies, including terrorist attacks. Unless further extended by the Assistant Secretary, a region that has received one of the following disaster declarations is eligible to apply for EDA assistance for a period of 18 months after the date of declaration:
  8. A Presidentially Declared Disaster declared under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. § 5121 et seq.); or
  9. A Federally Declared Disaster pursuant to the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act , as amended (16 U.S.C. § 1861a(a)); or
  10. A Federally Declared Disaster pursuant to the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act, as amended (7 U.S.C. § 1961); or
  11. A Federally Declared Disaster pursuant to the Small Business Act, as amended (Pub. L. No. 85-536, 72 Stat. 384 (1958)).
  12. Extraordinary depletion of natural resources or other impact attributable to a new or revised federal regulation or policy that will have a significant impact on a community to avoid an extraordinary depletion of natural resources.
  13. Communities undergoing transition of their economic base as a result of changing trade patterns. An area certified as eligible by the North American Development Bank (NADBank) Program or the Community Adjustment and Investment Program (CAIP).
  14. Other special need. The area is experiencing other special or extraordinary economic adjustment needs, as determined by the Assistant Secretary.

Contact us for more information!

EDA Public Works Funding, Rolling Deadlines