Small Community Air Service Grant Program, Deadline Jul. 22

The Small Community Program  is designed to provide financial assistance to small communities in order to help them enhance their air service. The Department provides this assistance in the form of monetary grants that are disbursed on a reimbursable basis. The Department has up to $5.5 million available for FY 2015 grant awards to carry out this program. There is no limit on the amount of individual awards, and the amounts awarded will vary depending upon the features and merits of the selected proposals. In past years, the Department’s individual grant sizes have ranged from $20,000 to nearly $1.6 million.

Eligible applicants are small communities that meet the following statutory criteria:

1) As of calendar year 1997, the airport serving the community was not larger than a small hub airport, and it has insufficient air carrier service or unreasonably high air fares; and 

2) The airport serving the community presents characteristics, such as geographic diversity or unique circumstances that demonstrate the need for, and feasibility of, grant assistance from the Small Community Program.

No more than four communities or consortia of communities, or a combination thereof, from the same state may be selected to participate in the program in any fiscal year. No more than 40 communities or consortia of communities, or a combination thereof, may be selected to participate in the program in each year for which the funds are appropriated. Consortium applications: Both individual communities and consortia of communities are eligible for SCASDP funds. An application from a consortium of communities must be one that seeks to facilitate the efforts of the communities working together toward one joint grant project, with one joint objective, including the establishment of one entity to ensure that the joint objective is accomplished.

Multiple Applications: A community may file only one application for a grant, either individually or as part of a consortium.Communities without existing air service: Communities that do not currently have commercial air service are eligible for SCASDP funds. Essential Air Service communities: Small communities that meet the basic SCASDP criteria and currently receive subsidized air service under the Essential Air Service (“EAS”) program are eligible to apply for SCASDP funds. However, grant awards to EAS-subsidized communities are limited to marketing or promotion projects that support existing or newly subsidized EAS. Grant funds will not be authorized for EAS-subsidized communities to support any new competing air service. Furthermore, no funds will be authorized to support additional flights by EAS carriers or changes to those carriers’ existing schedules. These restrictions are necessary to avoid conflicts with the mandate of the EAS program.

Contact us for more information!

Small Community Air Service Grant Program, Deadline Jul. 22

Rural Development RCDI Grants, Deadline Aug. 13

This program provides funding to help non-profit housing and community development organizations support housing, community facilities, and community and economic development projects in rural areas. Qualified private, nonprofit and public including tribal intermediary organizations proposing to carry out financial and technical assistance programs will be eligible to receive the funding. The Intermediary will be required to provide matching funds in an amount at least equal to the RCDI grant. The respective minimum and maximum grant amount per Intermediary is $50,000 and $250,000. The Intermediary must provide a program of financial and technical assistance to recipients to develop their capacity and ability to undertake projects related to housing, community facilities, or community and economic development that will support the community.

What is an eligible area?
Rural areas including cities, villages, townships, towns and Federally Recognized Tribal Lands outside the boundaries of a city of 50,000 or more and its immediately adjacent urbanized area.

Eligible Applicants:
County governments
State governments
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Small businesses
Private institutions of higher education
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
Independent school districts
Special district governments
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
City or township governments

How may funds be used?
To improve housing, community facilities, and community and economic development projects in rural areas. Rural Community Development Initiative grants may be used for, but are not limited to:

Training sub-grantees to conduct:

  1. Home-ownership education
  2. Minority business entrepreneur education

Providing technical assistance to sub-grantees on

  1. Strategic plan development
  2. Accessing alternative funding sources
  3. Board training
  4. Developing successful child care facilities
  5. Creating training tools, such as videos, workbooks, and reference guides
  6. Effective fundraising techniques

What kind of funding is available?

  • Minimum grant award is $50,000; maximum grant award is $250,000
  • Grant funds are limited and are awarded through a competitive process

Are matching funds required?

  • Matching fund requirement equal to amount of grant
  • In-kind contributions cannot be used as matching funds
  • Partnerships with other federal, state, local, private and nonprofit entities are encouraged

Contact us for more information!

Rural Development RCDI Grants, Deadline Aug. 13

NEA Our Town Grants, Deadline Sept. 21

The Our Town grant program supports creative placemaking projects that help to transform communities into lively, beautiful, and resilient places with the arts at their core. Creative placemaking is when artists, arts organizations, and community development practitioners deliberately integrate arts and culture into community revitalization work – placing arts at the table with land-use, transportation, economic development, education, housing, infrastructure, and public safety strategies. This funding supports local efforts to enhance quality of life and opportunity for existing residents, increase creative activity, and create a distinct sense of place.

Through Our Town, subject to the availability of funding, the National Endowment for the Arts will provide a limited number of grants for creative placemaking. Our Town requires partnerships between arts organizations and government, other nonprofit organizations, and private entities to achieve livability goals for communities.

Our Town offers support for projects in two areas:

  • Arts Engagement, Cultural Planning, and Design Projects. These projects represent the distinct character and quality of their communities. These projects require a partnership between a nonprofit organization and a local government entity, with one of the partners being a cultural organization. Matching grants range from $25,000 to $200,000.
  • Projects that Build Knowledge About Creative Placemaking. These projects are available to arts and design service organizations, and industry or university organizations that provide technical assistance to those doing place-based work. Matching grants range from $25,000 to $100,000.

OUR TOWN: Arts Engagment, Cultural Planning, and Design Projects – Applicant Eligibility

All applications require partnerships that involve at least two primary partners: a nonprofit organization and a local governmental entity, as defined by these guidelines. One of the two primary partners must be a cultural (arts or design) organization. Additional partners are encouraged.

One of the two primary partners must act as the official applicant (lead applicant). This lead applicant must meet the eligibility requirements, submit the application, and assume full responsibility for the grant.

Eligible lead applicants are:

  • Nonprofit tax-exempt 501(c)(3) U.S. organizations with a documented three-year history of programming.
  • Local governments. For the purposes of these guidelines, local governments are defined as counties, parishes, cities, towns, villages, or federally recognized tribal governments. Local arts agencies or other departments, agencies, or entities within an eligible local government may submit the application on behalf of that local government. The following do not qualify as local governments: state level government agencies, other state-designated entities, state higher education institutions, regional governments and entities, quasi-government organizations, regional planning organizations, and business improvement districts.For U.S. territories, if no local government exists, the territory government can serve as the local government.

To be eligible, the lead applicant organization must:

  • Meet the Arts Endowment’s “Legal Requirements,” including nonprofit, tax-exempt status, at the time of application.
  • Have submitted acceptable Final Report packages by the due date(s) for all Arts Endowment award(s) previously received.

Additional partners are encouraged and may include an appropriate variety of entities such as arts organizations and artists, design professionals and design centers, state level government agencies, foundations, nonprofit organizations, educational institutions, real estate developers, business leaders, community organizations, council of governments, rural planning organizations, transportation agencies, special districts, educational organizations, as well as public and governmental entities. Federal agencies cannot be monetary partners.

The designated state and jurisdictional arts agencies (SAAs) and their regional arts organizations (RAOs) may serve as partners, but not primary partners, in projects. NEA funds can’t support any SAA or RAO costs. There is an exception for U.S. territories. The territory’s SAA may serve as the local government primary partner. However, all grant funds must be passed on to the other partners.

You may apply to other Arts Endowment funding opportunities, including Art Works and Challenge America, in addition to Our Town. In each case, the request must be for a distinctly different project, or a distinctly different phase of a project. If you have applied to the NEA in the past and were not recommended for funding, you may apply again to any funding opportunity, including Our Town.

NEA Our Town Grants, Deadline Sept. 21

Local Food Promotion Grants, Deadline May 14

Approximately $13 million in competitive grant funds in fiscal year (FY) 2015 is available for award through the Local Food Promotion Program (LFPP).  LFPP offers grant funds with a 25% match to support the development and expansion of local and regional food business enterprises to increase domestic consumption of, and access to, locally and regionally produced agricultural products, and to develop new market opportunities for farm and ranch operations serving local markets.

Eligible entities may apply if they support local and regional food business enterprises that process, distribute, aggregate, or store locally or regionally produced food products. Such entities may include agricultural businesses, agricultural cooperatives, producer networks, producer associations, community supported agriculture networks, community supported agriculture associations, and other agricultural business entities (for-profit groups); nonprofit corporations; public benefit corporations; economic development corporations; regional farmers’ market authorities; and local and tribal governments.

Two types of project applications are accepted under LFPP—planning grants and implementation grants. Applicants can apply for either but will receive only one type of grant in the same grant cycle.

LFPP Planning Grants are used in the planning stages of establishing or expanding a local and regional food business enterprise. Activities can include but are not limited to market research, feasibility studies, and business planning. A minimum of $5,000 and a maximum of $25,000 will be awarded for any one proposal, and the grants must be completed within a 12 month period.

LFPP Implementation Grants are used to establish a new local and regional food business enterprise, or to improve or expand an existing local or regional food business enterprise. Activities can include but are not limited to training and technical assistance for the business enterprise and/or for producers working with the business enterprise; outreach and marketing to buyers and consumers; and non-construction infrastructure improvements to business enterprise facilities or information technology systems.

A minimum of $25,000 and a maximum of $100,000 will be awarded for any one proposal, and the grants must be completed within a 24 month grant period. Contact us for more information!

Eligible Applicants:

1. Agricultural Business. A business entity that provides, holds, delivers, transports, offers, or sells agricultural products or services.

2. Agricultural Cooperative. A group-owned or member-owned entity or business that provides, offers, or sells agricultural products or services for the mutual benefit of their members.

3. Producer Network. A producer group- or member-owned organization or business that provides, offers, or sells agricultural products or services through a common distribution system for the mutual benefit of their members.

4. Producer Associations. An organization or other business that assists, represents, or serves producers or a producer network.

5. Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) Network. A formal group of farms that work collectively to offer consumers regular (usually weekly) deliveries of locally-grown farm products during one or more harvest season(s), often on a subscription or membership basis. Customers have access to a selected share or range of farm products offered by the group of farmers based on partial or total advance payment of a subscription or membership fee.

6. CSA Associations. An organization or other business that assists or serves, represents, or services CSAs or CSA networks.

7. Local Government. Any unit of government within a state, including a county; borough; municipality; city; town; township; parish; local public authority, including any public housing agency under the United States Housing Act of 1937; special district; school district; intrastate district; council of governments, whether or not incorporated as a nonprofit corporation under state law; and any other agency or instrumentality of a multi-, regional, or intra-state or local government.

8. Nonprofit Corporation. Any corporation, trust, association, cooperative, or other organization, not including IHEs, that: (a) is operated primarily for scientific, educational, service, charitable, or similar purposes in the public interest; (b) is not organized primarily for profit; and (c) uses net proceeds to maintain, improve, or expand the operations of the organization.

9. Public Benefit Corporation. A corporation organized to construct or operate a public improvement, the profits from which inure to the benefit of a State(s) or to the people thereof.

10. Economic Development Corporation. An organization whose mission is the improvement, maintenance, development and/or marketing or promotion of a specific geographic area.

11. Regional Famers Market Authority. An entity that establishes and enforces regional, State, or county policies and jurisdiction over State, regional, or county farmers markets. 12. Tribal Government. A governing body or a governmental agency of any Indian tribe, band, nation, or other organized group or community (including any native village as defined in section 3 of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, 85 Stat. 688 (43 U.S.C. § 1602)) certified by the Secretary of the Interior as eligible for the special programs and services provided through the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Local Food Promotion Grants, Deadline May 14

Community Connect Broadband Grants, Deadline Feb. 17

The Community-Oriented Connectivity Broadband Grant Program (Community Connect Grant Program) is designed to provide financial assistance to provide service at the Broadband Grant Speed in rural, economically-challenged communities where broadband service does not currently exist. Grant funds may be used to: (1) deploy service at the Broadband Grant Speed to critical community facilities, rural residents, and rural businesses, (2) construct, acquire, or expand a community center, and (3) equip a community center that provides free access to service at the Broadband Grant Speed to community residents for at least two years. Grants will be awarded on a competitive basis for entities to serve all premises in eligible rural areas at the Broadband Grant Speed to ensure rural consumers enjoy the same quality and range of broadband services as are available in urban and suburban communities.

Eligible Applicants: 
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Private institutions of higher education
Small businesses
State governments
City or township governments
Special district governments
Independent school districts
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
County governments
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)

Contact us for more information!

Community Connect Broadband Grants, Deadline Feb. 17

Rural Community Development Initiative, Deadline Nov. 12

800px-Ashs-digital-technology-suite

Rural Development has announced  $5,967,000 in Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 funding for competitive grant funds for the Rural Community Development Initiative (RCDI) program.. Applicants must provide matching funds in an amount at least equal to the Federal grant. These grants will be made to qualified intermediary organizations that will provide financial and technical assistance to recipients to develop their capacity and ability to undertake projects related to housing, community facilities, or community and economic development that will support the community.

Fund uses must be consistent with the RCDI purpose. A nonexclusive list of eligible grant uses includes the following:
1. Provide technical assistance to develop recipients’ capacity and ability to undertake projects related to housing, community facilities, or community and
economic development, e.g., the intermediary hires a staff person to provide technical assistance to the recipient or the recipient hires a staff
person, under the supervision of the intermediary, to carry out the technical assistance provided by the intermediary.
2. Develop the capacity of recipients to conduct community development programs, e.g., homeownership education or training for business entrepreneurs.
3. Develop the capacity of recipients to conduct development initiatives, e.g., programs that support micro-enterprise and sustainable development.
4. Develop the capacity of recipients to increase their leveraging ability and access to alternative funding sources by providing training and staffing.
5. Develop the capacity of recipients to provide the technical assistance component for essential community facilities projects.
6. Assist recipients in completing pre-development requirements for housing, community facilities, or community and economic development projects by
providing resources for professional services, e.g., architectural, engineering, or legal.
7. Improve recipient’s organizational capacity by providing training and resource material on developing strategic plans, board operations, management, financial systems, and
information technology.
8. Purchase of computers, software, and printers, limited to $10,000 per award, at the recipient level when directly related to the technical assistance program being undertaken by
the intermediary.
9. Provide funds to recipients for training-related travel costs and training expenses related to RCDI.

Contact us for more details!

Rural Community Development Initiative, Deadline Nov. 12

Rural Development Rural Business Opportunity Grants (RBOG), Deadline June 13

800px-Ashs-digital-technology-suite

Program Status: OPEN on May 2, 2014

Estimated Program Funding: $2.25 Million
Maximum Grant Amount: $100,000
Cost Sharing Requirement: None

Eligible applicants: Public bodies, nonprofit corporations, Indian tribes, institutions of higher education, and rural cooperatives are eligible to apply.

Grant funds must be used for projects in rural areas and they can be used for:
– Community economic development
– Technology-based economic development
– Feasibility studies and business plans
– Leadership and entrepreneur training
– Rural business incubators
– Long-term business strategic planning

Rural Development Rural Business Opportunity Grants (RBOG), Deadline June 13

Coastal Zone Program, Deadline Dec. 31

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Note: This is an earlier deadline than past years!

The CZM Program strongly encourages interested applicants to contact program staff early in the proposal development process for assistance and guidance.  Complete applications will be evaluated for funding based on the following considerations:

  • Extent to which the project furthers CZM Program objectives.
  • Overall quality and clarity of the application.
  • Organizational capability of the applicant to complete project as proposed.
  • Project readiness and feasibility for completion within specified grant period.
  • Past grant management performance.
  • Cost-effectiveness.
  • Degree of public benefit to be derived from the project.
  • Measurability of project results.
  • Level of local support.
  • Leveraging private and other public resources.
  • The likelihood that the project could proceed in the absence of CZM Program funding.

The CZM Program staff will coordinate the review of the applications with other state agency staff, and recommend projects to the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) Director for funding.  Projects approved by the MDEQ Director will be submitted to the NOAA for final review and approval.

A. Who is Eligible

  • Coastal units of government including cities, counties, villages, and townships.
  • Regional planning agencies and conservation districts.
  • State agencies.
  •  Universities and school districts.
  • Tribal governments.
  • Nonprofit organizations (Note:  Nonprofit organizations proposing construction projects on public lands must apply through an eligible public entity to ensure public ownership.).

An applicant for which any of the following conditions existed in the 12 months prior to the application deadline for this RFP is not eligible for funding:

  • MDEQ grant contract terminated.
  • Unresolved MDEQ enforcement actions.
  • History of inability to manage grants or meet MDEQ contractual terms and conditions.

B. Grant Amounts
No less than $10,000 and no greater than $100,000.

C.    Match Requirement
A one-to-one non-federal match is required for all projects.  Match may be in the form of cash, in-kind services, or donations.  Match funding sources, such as Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Michigan Department of Transportation, or other must be secured at time of CZM application submittal.  Applicants are required to provide documentation of secured funding.

D. Project Award Period
The standard project award start date will be October 1, 2014, and end date December 31, 2015.

E. Project Location
Construction projects must be entirely within Michigan’s coastal boundary, which generally extends a minimum of 1,000 feet inland from the ordinary high water mark.  The boundary ranges further inland in some locations to encompass important coastal features such as lakes, bays, wetlands, dunes, urban areas, public recreational parks, and natural areas.  Other types of projects that propose activities such as planning, outreach, and/or training that extend outside the coastal boundary will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.  Federally-owned lands are excluded from the coastal zone.

F. Ineligible Uses for Grant Funds

  • Creating or restoring restroom facilities.
  • Creating or restoring general recreational and athletic facilities such as playground equipment, ball fields, and courts.
  • Construction projects that propose to install or repair/maintain hard shoreline armoring such as rip-rap, sheet pile, and/or gabions.
  • Dredging projects.
  • Roadway design and/or road construction projects.
  • Sewer line construction and/or drain improvement projects.
  • Recreation plans.
  • Dam improvements.
  • State and federal permit application fees.
  • Projects required tofulfill a state or federal permit condition or other regulatory action.
  • Development of site plans, designs, or construction drawings for improving land or structures not under control of the applicant.

G. Application Deadline
Applications must be submitted with two hard copies, one electronic copy (CD, DVD, or USB Flash Drive (non-returnable)), and postmarked no later than December 31, 2013, to qualify for consideration.

The CZM Program has five focus areas:  Public Access, Coastal Habitat, Coastal Hazards, Coastal Water Quality, and Coastal Community Development.

A.  Public Access
The Great Lakes are a primary focus for recreation and tourism in Michigan. The CZM Program protects, restores, creates, and enhances public access to the Great Lakes using approaches that support coastal communities and fosters appreciation of our natural resources.  The CZM Program is committed to providing public access to the Great Lakes for recreational use through the following types of projects:

  • Planning, design, and engineering for low-cost construction projects for a specific site location.
  • Low-cost construction projects such as non-motorized coastal trails, boardwalks, barrier-free canoe or kayak launches and fishing piers, pervious parking lots and walkways, viewing decks, installation of interpretive signage/displays, and other amenities to improve public access to Great Lakes and coastal resources.

Preference will be given to projects with elements that:

  • Increase and improve universal public access for all visitors to our Great Lakes coastline.
  • Preserve and restore cultural and historic maritime resources such as lighthouses, shipwrecks, and other Great Lakes maritime heritage features.
  • Plan and construct shoreland protection utilizing soft-shore engineering and native plantings.
  • Implement activities that are part of an adopted waterfront or coastal community plan that incorporate green infrastructure practices that reduce storm water runoff and that utilize environmentally friendly materials.
  • Promote stewardship of coastal resources.
  • Conduct educational and outreach activities to improve public understanding of public access to the Great Lakes and connecting waters and its importance to communities and the economy.
  • Conduct training events to provide coastal decision makers with knowledge and tools to comprehensively plan for and manage public access.

B.  Coastal Habitat
The CZM Program is committed to protecting, managing, and restoring sensitive coastal habitats, including wetlands and sand dunes.  Coastal wetlands serve as spawning and nesting habitat for a variety of animals, help maintain water quality, provide erosion control, and offer recreational and tourism opportunities.  Michigan is home to the world’s largest expanse of freshwater sand dunes, and protection of these resources and the habitat they provide remains a significant focus of the program.

The CZM Program supports the following types of projects:

  • On-the-ground protection and restoration projects for Great Lakes beaches, sand dunes, coastal wetlands, streams, and nearshore habitat.  Restoration projects may include invasive species control and removal, prescribed burns, and native vegetation plantings that are proposed as part of a site management plan.
  • Feasibility studies and planning for habitat protection, restoration, and resource management.
  • Inventories of natural features that are incorporated into a local or statewide plan.

Preference will be given to projects with elements that:

  • Conduct statewide Great Lakes marine debris collection/cleanup activities.
  • Focus on regional plans and activities for protecting and managing coastal habitats.
  • Foster partnerships and actions to protect critical dunes.
  • Assist coastal communities to develop vulnerability assessments for improving the resiliency of coastal wetlands to climate change impacts.
  • Provide protection for coastal resources, including activities to prevent the introduction and spread of new invasive species such as design and installation of interpretive signage/displays at high quality sites or cleaning/disposal stations for boaters and other recreational users.
  • Promote stewardship of the coastal resources.
  • Conduct educational and outreach activities to improve public understanding of the intrinsic value of coastal habitats to the Great Lake ecosystem.
  • Conduct training events to provide coastal decision makers with knowledge and tools to comprehensively plan for and manage coastal habitats.

C.  Coastal Hazards
The CZM Program supports efforts that increase a community’s resilience to coastal erosion and flood hazards and minimize the loss of life and property caused by dangerous currents and/or improper development in areas vulnerable to coastal hazards.  This is accomplished by supporting creative local efforts that increase scientific knowledge and public awareness of coastal erosion and flooding, as well as activities that actively direct coastal development away from areas prone to these Great Lakes coastal hazards.  Projects may be regional, community-based, or site-specific in scale and may consist of planning, research, or implementation activities.

The CZM Program supports the following types of projects:

  • Development of regional coastal hazard atlases containing information such as shoreline type, historical erosion rates, local policies affecting development in the coastal zone, and other information that can be used by local officials, realtors, developers, and the general public to assist with appropriate decision making about coastal zone development.
  • Development and implementation of local shoreline management plans or coastal zoning ordinances providing construction setbacks or buffers that complement those of the state’s high-risk erosion area program.
  • Site level shoreline erosion assessments on public lands, especially when part of a site feasibility study for locating or relocating infrastructure and/or alternatives analysis for implementation of soft-shore approaches to shoreline stabilization.

Preference will be given to projects with elements that:

  • Conduct vulnerability assessments and include direct application of the assessment toward improving the resiliency of coastal communities or a public asset such as a coastal park.  Assessments may include geologic/geomorphic investigation, analysis of local wave climate and coastal processes, sediment budget analysis, historic recession or erosion analysis, and other necessary data collection and analysis to provide for appropriate shore management actions.
  • Provide for local education/outreach initiatives or implementation activities to increase beach safety with respect to dangerous currents and other swim risks (e.g., signs, flag warning system installation, and beach safety kits).
  • Conduct educational and outreach activities to improve public understanding of coastal hazards.
  • Conduct training events to provide coastal decision makers with knowledge and tools to comprehensively plan for coastal resiliency, and to implement resources and protect against coastal hazards.

D.  Coastal Water Quality
The CZM Program is committed to the protection of high quality waters.  There are important water quality benefits and potential cost savings from protecting high quality waters and preventing impairments in waters
that currently meet water quality standards.  Protection, restoration, and enhancement of critical coastal
resources such as wetlands and beaches are essential for the protection of high quality waters.  The CZM
Program supports the following types of projects:

  • Development of ordinances, policies, and/or plans addressing management of coastal nonpoint source pollution.
  • On-the-ground implementation activities to protect and improve beach health at publicly-owned Great Lakes beaches.  Examples include the installation of soft-engineering storm water infiltration and diversion systems, reduction or elimination of impervious surfaces, and installation of landscape design features that discourage waterfowl from congregating on the beach.

Preference will be given to projects with elements that:

  • Demonstrate the interconnectedness between the protection of critical coastal resources such as beaches, coastal wetlands, sand dunes, and high quality waters.
  • Promote stewardship of coastal resources.
  • Conduct educational and outreach activities to improve public understanding of the importance of protecting high quality waters of the Great Lakes and connecting waters and its importance to communities and the economy.
  • Conduct training events to provide coastal decision makers with knowledge and tools to comprehensively plan for protecting high quality waters.

E.  Coastal Community Development
The CZM Program promotes wise management of Great Lakes water and coastal resources through the development of vibrant and resilient coastal communities.  Managed well, our coast supports resilient communities with healthy natural ecosystems that provide the economic, social, and ecological foundations for a high quality of life.  Community land use plans and zoning ordinances supported with CZM funding must be developed in accordance with the requirements of applicable state planning and zoning enabling statutes.  The CZM Program supports the following types of projects:

  • Development of ordinances, policies, and plans focused on management of coastal resources based on an ecosystem approach.
  • Planning and feasibility studies for waterfront redevelopment and ports management.
  • Development and promotion of regional coastal tourism and recreation opportunities.
  • Collaborative regional or multi-jurisdictional planning or policy development.

Preference will be given to projects that:

  • Develop comprehensive community plans that include elements such as mixed land uses, compact development patterns, form-based codes, walkable neighborhoods, and preservation of open space.
  • Include coastal water trail development and promotion.
  • Promote stewardship of coastal resources.
  • Conduct educational and outreach activities to improve public understanding of the importance of wise management of coastal cultural and natural resources.
  • Conduct training events to provide coastal decision makers with knowledge and tools to comprehensively plan for the wise management of coastal cultural and natural resources.
Coastal Zone Program, Deadline Dec. 31

Downtown Infrastructure Grant (DIG) Program, Deadline Oct. 1

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

On behalf of the Michigan Strategic Fund, the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) is accepting Part I Applications for new projects under the State of Michigan’s Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Downtown Infrastructure Grant (DIG) program. The CDBG DIG program is designed to assist communities seeking to improve their downtown district infrastructure quality. Entitlement Communities are not eligible for DIG funding. This program is restricted to providing public infrastructure improvement funding for Low and Moderate Income Communities and Project Areas with projects that are located in a traditional downtown. Grant requests must be at least $30,000 and cannot exceed $750,000. The total amount of grant funds available for the DIG program is $4,000,000. Due to funding limitations, only one submission per community is allowed.

The project will be required to be completed by December 31, 2014. If a project’s timing cannot accommodate this requirement, an application should not be submitted. This will be strictly enforced and extensions will not be allowed. Administration costs will not be eligible as CDBG funding, but will be allowed as match funded activities. The capacity of the Unit of General Local Government (UGLG) to administer the project will also be taken into consideration. Here are some project examples.

Key elements:

  • 10% local match
  • Minimum request amount: $30,000; Maximum request amount: $750,000
  • On low-mod list with a traditional downtown
  • Property owned by local unit of government
  • Includes maintenance plan

Evaluation criteria:

  • Local match
  • Leverage funding from other sources
  • No other open grants
  • Square footage of public space being improved
  • Existing downtown development plan?
  • DDA area?
  • Redevelopment Ready Community?
  • Meets existing capital improvements plan?

Contact us for more details!

Downtown Infrastructure Grant (DIG) Program, Deadline Oct. 1

Small Community Air Grants, Due July 26

The Department has up to 11.5 million available for FY 2013 grant awards to carry out this program. There is no limit on the amount of individual awards, and the amounts awarded will vary depending upon the features and merits of the selected proposals. In past years, the Department’s individual grant sizes have ranged from 20,000 dollars to nearly 1.6 million.

Eligible applicants are small communities that meet the following statutory criteria under 49 U.S.C. § 41743:

1. As of calendar year 1997, the airport serving the community was not larger than a small hub airport, and it has insufficient air carrier service or unreasonably high air fares; and

2.The airport serving the community presents characteristics, such as geographic diversity or unique circumstances that demonstrate the need for, and feasibility of, grant assistance from the Small Community Program. No more than four communities or consortia of communities, or a combination thereof, from the same state may be selected to participate in the program in any fiscal year. No more than 40 communities or consortia of communities, or a combination thereof, may be selected to participate in the program in each year for which the funds are appropriated.

Communities without existing air service: Communities that do not currently have commercial air service are eligible for SCASDP funds, but air service providers must have met or be able to meet in a reasonable period, all Department requirements for air service certification, including safety and economic authorities.

Essential Air Service communities: Small communities that meet the basic SCASDP criteria and currently receive subsidized air service under the Essential Air Service (“EAS”) program are eligible to apply for SCASDP funds. However, grant awards to EAS-subsidized communities are limited to marketing or promotion projects that support existing or newly subsidized EAS. Grant funds will not be authorized for EAS-subsidized communities to support any new competing air service. Furthermore, no funds will be authorized to support additional flights by EAS carriers or changes to those carriers’ existing schedules. These restrictions are necessary to avoid conflicts with the mandate of the EAS program. Consortium applications: Both individual communities and consortia of communities are eligible for SCASDP funds. An application from a consortium of communities must be one that seeks to facilitate the efforts of the communities working together toward one joint grant project, with one joint objective, including the establishment of one entity to ensure that the joint objective is accomplished. Multiple Applications: Communities may file only one application for a grant, either individually or as part of a consortium.

Contact us for more information!

Small Community Air Grants, Due July 26