Lighthouse Grants, Deadline Nov. 17

The Michigan Lighthouse Assistance Program (MLAP) was established to assist in the preservation, rehabilitation and protection of historic lighthouses in Michigan. This grant program is managed through the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), Michigan State Housing Development Authority (MSHDA). Funding for the MLAP comes from the sale of lighthouse license plates. These grant dollars are exclusive to light station rehabilitation and planning projects for light station resources listed or eligible for listing in the National Register.

Eligible Applicants

Nonprofit organizations and state or local governments that own (or are in the process of acquiring) or have long-term leases on a lighthouse are eligible to apply for these funds. Private individuals are not eligible for these grants.

The project must be ready to proceed at the time of application and must not be dependent on future actions, approval, or cooperation from other organizations before the project can begin.

This program requires a 50% match, grant awards $7,500 – $60,000. Applications are due by 5 pm November 15. Contact us for more information on this program. To learn more about GFA please visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

Lighthouse Grants, Deadline Nov. 17

MCACA Arts & Culture Grants, Deadline June 1

Operational Support Grants

The focus of the Operational Support Category is to provide specific operational support to arts and cultural organizations only. Municipalities, schools and non-arts nonprofit organizations are encouraged to apply in the Projects Support category.
Deadline to Apply: June 1, 2017

Project Support Grants

The focus of the Projects Support Category is to provide quality arts and cultural, as well as educational, projects to citizens across the state. This category funds specific arts projects conducted by non-profit organizations, municipalities and educational institutions and other organizations that utilize the talents and creativity of professional artists or arts educators in all arts disciplines to advance the creative, cultural and economic environment of the state.
Deadline to Apply: June 1, 2017

Capital Improvement Program

The Capital Improvement grant category provides funding assistance to Michigan nonprofit arts and cultural organizations and municipalities for the expansion, renovation or construction of cultural facilities; upgrade of equipment and furnishing to provide a competitive and up-to-date environment; equipment and instrument acquisitions that are integral to the implementation of events and services. The improvements resulting from these grants enable citizens of all ages and abilities to enjoy more cultural events while increasing their participation within their communities.
Deadline to Apply: June 1, 2017

Contact us for more information on these programs. To learn more about GFA please visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

MCACA Arts & Culture Grants, Deadline June 1

NEA Our Town Grants, Deadline Sept. 12

Organizations may apply for creative placemaking projects that contribute to the livability of communities and place the arts at their core. Our Town offers support for projects in two areas: • Arts Engagement, Cultural Planning, and Design Projects that represent the distinct character and quality of their communities. These projects require a partnership between a nonprofit organization and a local government entity, with one of the partners being a cultural organization. Matching grants range from $25,000 to $200,000.

Eligible Applicants:
Special district governments
Private institutions of higher education
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Independent school districts
State governments
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
County governments
City or township governments
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)

Application deadline is Sept. 12 and potential applicants would be advised to start work early! Contact us for more information. To learn more about GFA visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

NEA Our Town Grants, Deadline Sept. 12

Arts Operational & Project Support Grants, Deadline June 1

The focus of the Operational Support Category is to provide specific operational support to arts and cultural organizations only. Municipalities, schools and non-arts nonprofit organizations are encouraged to apply in the Projects Support category. MCACA defines arts and cultural organizations as those organizations whose primary mission is to provide an experience, including a learning experience, that is based in a specific arts or cultural discipline. These organization types are: Arts Education Organizations, Arts Services Organizations, Collecting or Material Organizations, Public Broadcasting Organizations, Literary Arts Organizations, Performing Arts Organizations and Visual Arts/Film/Video Organizations.

Applicants must be a 501(c)3 with cash matching funds.


 

The focus of the Projects Support Category is to provide quality arts and cultural, as well as educational, projects to citizens across the state. This category funds specific arts projects conducted by non-profit organizations, municipalities and educational institutions and other organizations that utilize the talents and creativity of professional artists or arts educators in all arts disciplines to advance the creative, cultural and economic environment of the state. Funding may only be used for artist fees directly related to the project, salaries or wages directly related to the project, space rental, marketing or promotional expenses directly related to the project, project supplies and materials including performance or other production costs, project-related curriculum materials.

Applicants must be a 501(c)3 with cash matching funds.

Arts Operational & Project Support Grants, Deadline June 1

National Maritime Heritage Grants, Deadline Sept. 23

Beginning on June 23, state, tribal, and local governments and private non-profit organizations can submit applications for National Maritime Heritage Grants! Approximately $1,700,000 is available for 2014. Grant proposals will be accepted until September 23, 2014.

Approximately $1.7 million in National Maritime Heritage Grants for education or preservation projects are available for 2014. Proposals for grants will be accepted from June 23 until September 23, 2014. Education projects can request $25,000-50,000 and preservation projects can request $50,000-200,000. Funding for Maritime Heritage Grants is competitive and requires a 1-to-1 match with non-Federal assets from non-Federal sources. Project grants are administered through the Maritime Heritage Program and State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs).

Contact us for more information!

National Maritime Heritage Grants, Deadline Sept. 23

NEA Our Town Program, Deadline Jan. 13

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Through Our Town, subject to the availability of funding, the National Endowment for the Arts will provide a limited number of grants, ranging from $25,000 to $200,000, for creative placemaking projects that contribute toward the livability of communities and help transform them into lively, beautiful, and sustainable places with the arts at their core. Our Town will invest in creative and innovative projects in which communities, together with their arts and design organizations and artists, seek to:

  •     Improve their quality of life.
  •     Encourage greater creative activity.
  •     Foster stronger community identity and a sense of place.
  •     Revitalize economic development.

Partnerships

A key to the success of creative placemaking is involving the arts in partnership with committed governmental and private sector leadership. All Our Town applications must reflect a partnership that will provide leadership for the project. These partnerships must involve two primary partners: a nonprofit organization and a local government entity, as defined by these guidelines. One of the two primary partners must be a cultural (arts or design) organization. The highest ranking official of the local government is required to submit a formal endorsement letter designating the project as the only one being submitted for the local government. Additional partners are encouraged and may include an appropriate variety of entities such as state level government agencies, foundations, arts organizations and artists, nonprofit organizations, design professionals and design centers, educational institutions, real estate developers, business leaders, and community organizations, as well as public and governmental entities.

Our Town projects should represent the distinct character and quality of their communities and must reflect the following principles:

  •     A systemic approach to civic development and a persuasive vision for enhanced community livability.
  •     Clearly defined civic development goals and objectives that recognize and enhance the role that the arts and design play at the center of community life.
  •     An action plan aligned with the project vision and civic development goals.
  •     A funding plan that is appropriate, feasible, indicates strong and wide community support, and includes a well-conceived strategy for maintaining the work of the project.
  •     Artistic excellence of the design and/or arts organizations, designers, or artists involved with the project.

Projects may include arts engagement, cultural planning, and design activities such as:

  • Arts Engagement
  • Arts engagement projects support artistically excellent artistic production or practice as the focus of creative placemaking work.
  • Innovative programming that fosters interaction among community members, arts organizations, and artists, or activates existing cultural and community assets.
  • Festivals and performances in spaces not normally used for such purposes.
  • Public art that improves public spaces and strategically reflects or shapes the physical and social character of a community.

Cultural Planning

Cultural planning projects support the development of artistically excellent local support systems necessary for creative placemaking to succeed.

  •     Creative asset mapping.
  •     Cultural district planning.
  •     The development of master plans or community-wide strategies for public art.
  •     Support for creative entrepreneurship.
  •     Creative industry cluster/hub development.

Design

Design projects that demonstrate artistic excellence while supporting the development of environments where creative placemaking takes place, or where the identity of place is created or reinforced.

  •     Design of rehearsal, studio, or live/work spaces for artists.
  •     Design of cultural spaces – new or adaptive reuse.
  •     Design of public spaces, e.g., parks, plazas, landscapes, neighborhoods, districts, infrastructure, bridges, and artist-produced elements of streetscapes. Community engagement activities including design charrettes, design competitions, and community design workshops.

When eligible, previous Our Town grantees and their communities may apply to Our Town for a distinctly different project, or a distinctly different phase of the project, from that which was funded.

We understand that creative placemaking projects are often multi-year, large-scale initiatives. Please specify in your application which phase or phases of your project are included in your request for NEA funding. All phases of a project — except for those for facilities noted below — are eligible for support. The NEA reserves the right to limit its support of a project to a particular phase(s) or cost(s). All costs included in your Project Budget must be expended during your period of support.

If relevant to your project, you will be required to provide information in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and/or the National Historic Preservation Act.

Contact us for more information!

NEA Our Town Program, Deadline Jan. 13

NEH Challenge Grants, Deadline May 1

NEH challenge grants are capacity-building grants, intended to help institutions and organizations secure long-term improvements in and support for their humanities programs and resources. Through these awards, many organizations and institutions have been able to increase their humanities capacity and secure the permanent support of an endowment. Grants may be used to establish or enhance endowments or spend-down funds that generate expendable earnings to support and enhance ongoing program activities. Challenge grants may also provide capital directly supporting the procurement of long-lasting objects, such as acquisitions for archives and collections, the purchase of equipment, and the construction or renovation of facilities needed for humanities activities. Funds spent directly must be shown to bring long-term benefits to the institution and to the humanities more broadly. Grantee institutions may also expend up to 10 percent of total grant funds (federal funds plus matching funds) to defray costs of fundraising to meet the NEH challenge. Because of the matching requirement, these NEH grants also strengthen the humanities by encouraging nonfederal sources of support.

Contact us for more information!

NEH Challenge Grants, Deadline May 1

Museums for America Grant, Deadline Jan. 15

The goal of the Museums for America (MFA) program is to strengthen the ability of an individual museum to serve the public more effectively by supporting high-priority activities that advance its mission, plans, and strategic goals and objectives. MFA grants support activities that strengthen museums as active resources for lifelong learning, as important institutions in the establishment of livable communities, and as good stewards of the nation’s collections. MFA grants can fund both new and ongoing museum activities and programs. Examples include planning, managing and conserving collections, improving public access, training, conducting programmatic research, school and public programming, producing exhibitions, and integrating new or upgraded technologies into your operations.

There are three categories within the MFA program:

Learning Experiences IMLS places the learner at the center and supports engaging experiences in museums that prepare people to be full participants in their local communities and our global society. Projects should deliver high quality, inclusive, accessible and audience-focused programs, exhibitions, and services for lifelong learning in formal or informal settings.

Community Anchors IMLS promotes museums as strong community anchors that enhance civic engagement, cultural opportunities, and economic vitality. Projects should address common community challenges and demonstrate how your museum improves the quality of life and enriches community members’ knowledge and understanding of critical local and global issues, provides forums for community dialogue, and/or connects individuals to resources in the broader community service infrastructure through its programs and services. Projects may include capacity-building activities that position your museum to be more effective in fulfilling its role as a community anchor institution.

Collections Stewardship IMLS supports exemplary stewardship of museum collections and promotes the use of technology to facilitate discovery of knowledge and cultural heritage. Projects should support the care and management of collections to expand and sustain access for current and future generations. Projects should reflect systematic, holistic, logical approaches to the documentation, preservation, and conservation of tangible and digital collections to sustain and improve public access. Note to applicants: The FY 2013 Museums for America program now incorporates proposals previously solicited through the Conservation Project Support program.

To be eligible for an award under the FY2013 Museums for America program, you must be an organization that meets all three of the following criteria:

•You must be either a unit of State or local government or be a private nonprofit organization that has tax-exempt status under the Internal Revenue Code;

•You must be located in one of the 50 States of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, or the Republic of Palau; and

•You must qualify as one of the following: 1. A museum that, using a professional staff, is organized on a permanent basis for essentially educational or aesthetic purposes; owns or uses tangible objects, either animate or inanimate; cares for these objects; and exhibits these objects to the general public on a regular basis through facilities that is owns or operates.

What types of museums are eligible? Museums include, but are not limited to, aquariums, arboretums, art museums, botanical gardens, children’s/youth museums, general museums (those having two or more significant disciplines), historic houses/sites, history museums, natural history/anthropology museums, nature centers, planetariums, science/technology centers, specialized museums (limited to a single distinct subject), and zoological parks. What does it mean to be using a professional staff? An institution uses a professional staff if it employs at least one staff member, or the full-time equivalent, whether paid or unpaid, primarily engaged in the acquisition, care, or exhibition to the public of objects owned or used by the institution. What does it mean to exhibit the objects to the general public? An institution exhibits objects to the general public if such exhibition is a primary purpose of the institution. An institution that exhibits objects to the general public for at least 120 days a year is deemed to exhibit objects to the general public on a regular basis. An institution which does not have the exhibition of objects as a primary purpose and/or does not exhibit objects to the public for at least 120 days a year may be determined to be eligible as a museum under certain circumstances. For more information, please see 45 CFR §1180.2(d). 2. A public or private nonprofit agency which is responsible for the operation of a museum may apply on behalf of the museum.

Original Closing Date for Applications:     Jan 15, 2013
Current Closing Date for Applications:     Jan 15, 2013
Archive Date:     Feb 14, 2013
Funding Instrument Type:     Grant
Expected Number of Awards:     185
Award Ceiling:     $150,000
Award Floor:     $5,000
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement:     Yes

Contact us for more information!

Museums for America Grant, Deadline Jan. 15

Prime Time Family Reading Time Grants, Deadline May 15

For all new PRIME TIME Family Reading Time® programs, the Michigan Humanities Council will provide $9,000 to selected libraries to cover the majority of program expenses. Any public library system in the state of Michigan is eligible to apply to host a six-week PRIME TIME® series. A library system must commit to hosting a minimum of three PRIME TIME® series over a two-year period.

Deadline: May 15, 2012 for July 2012 training

Details on the Prime Time program are provided below:

The Michigan Humanities Council works with public libraries and public schools across the state to host PRIME TIME Family Reading Time® programs. PRIME TIME® is a six-week program of reading, discussion and storytelling that targets families of non-active library users. The program features award-winning children’s literature to stimulate discussion about humanities themes and issues encountered in everyday life. Since 2008, more than 6,700 Michigan children and parents have participated in PRIME TIME®.

Each session is 90 minutes and includes the reading of up to three books by a storyteller, followed by facilitated discussion with a humanities scholar. Programs typically serve 20 to 25 families comprised of parents and children ages 6-12 with separate pre-reading activities planned for children 5 and under. Programs may be presented in English or as a bilingual Spanish/English program.
PRIME TIME® Goals:

  •     Bond families around the act of reading and learning together;
  •     Reinforce the role of family;
  •     Encourage parents and children to read and discuss the humanities topics raised in the books;
  •     Help parents and children become active library users; and
  •     Highlight the importance of the library in local community and daily life.

PRIME TIME® is offered by the Michigan Humanities Council in cooperation with the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, and with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Library Association, Grand Haven Area Community Foundation – W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and additional corporate and private sponsors.
Who May Host a Program?

Any public library system or public school library in the state of Michigan is eligible to apply to host a six-week PRIME TIME® series. A library system or public school library must commit to hosting a minimum of three PRIME TIME® series over a two-year period. The second and third series may occur in the same library or at another library within the same system.

As of September 2011, there are 19 Michigan libraries who are hosting or have hosted the program through the Michigan Humanities Council. Those libraries are: Alpena County George N. Fletcher Public Library (Alpena), Cass District Library (Cassopolis), Charlevoix Public Library, Detroit Public Library – Campbell (Detroit), Detroit Public Library – Conley (Detroit), Hackley Public Library (Muskegon), Hamtramck Public Library (Hamtramck), Harper Woods Public Library (Harper Woods), Highland Twp. Public Library (Highland), Hoyt Public Library of the Saginaw Public Libraries (Saginaw), Jackson District Library – Carnegie Branch (Jackson), Lenawee County Library – Main Branch (Adrian), Loutit District Library (Grand Haven), Monroe County Library System – Navarre Branch (Monroe), Peter White Public Library (Marquette), Saginaw Butman Fish Library (Saginaw), South Haven Memorial Library, Stair Public Library (Morenci), and the Saginaw Chippewa Tribal Library (Mt. Pleasant.)
How Much Does PRIME TIME® Cost?

For all new PRIME TIME® programs, the Council will provide $9,000 to the library to cover the majority of program expenses. These expenses include a two-day mandatory training session for the library coordinator, scholar and storyteller in New Orleans, stipends for the scholar and storyteller, and a portion of the book costs. If your library has previously hosted PRIME TIME®, mini grants will be available up to $2,000. The library must provide a budget, which includes cash and in-kind cost share, to cover the remainder of the book costs as well as miscellaneous program expenses that will vary by site.
Additional Host Library Requirements:

  •     Identify a library coordinator who will attend a two-day training session in New Orleans along with a program scholar and storyteller (team responsibilities);
  •     Order and catalog program books from an approved PRIME TIME® syllabus;
  •     Promote PRIME TIME® according to Council guidelines and recruit 20-25 families;
  •     Provide credit to the Council in all promotional materials;
  •     Arrange for family transportation to and from the program as needed;
  •     Provide adequate space for meals/snacks, the PRIME TIME reading and discussion, and preschool activities;
  •     Provide a weekly five-minute “library commercial” to introduce families to additional library programs and  resources;
  •     Organize staff and resources for weekly preschool activities (a manual of suggested readings/activities is provided at the training in New Orleans);
  •     Issue library cards to all participating families;
  •     Complete and submit required reports to the Council upon conclusion of the program
  •     Administer and compile required participant surveys including entry, exit, and 90-day follow-up surveys;
  •     Provide cash and/or in-kind support for program costs not covered by Council funds;
  •     Present award certificates and gift books to families at program’s end.

Responsibilities of the Michigan Humanities Council

  •     Provide staff support and technical assistance regarding PRIME TIME®
  •     Act as intermediary between the library and the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities
  •     Assist in promotion and securing printed promotional materials
  •     Conduct site visits and program evaluation
  •     Assist library in identifying an appropriate scholar and storyteller as needed
  •     Write proposals for future funding
  •     Provide 30 reusable book bags
  •     Pay the required partnership fee to Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities ($500/site)

How your library can apply to host PRIME TIME®

Please submit a one-page letter of interest to the attention of Robin Soergel, Education Programs and Outreach Officer (rsoergel@mihumanities.org, phone: 517-372-7770) to be considered. For new PRIME TIME® sites, please consider the following in the letter of interest:

Name of the library/system;
Community demographics supporting need for PRIME TIME® in your area;
Examples of prior literacy and/or reading and discussion family programs hosted by your library;
Partnering agencies that could assist your library to recruit non-library-using families and volunteer support.
Submit a proposed budget

Prime Time Family Reading Time Grants, Deadline May 15

Grants for Non-Profits, Deadline June 1

Bay Harbor Foundation Requests 2011 Grant Applications

Bay Harbor, MI – The Bay Harbor Foundation is requesting letters of intent for 2011 projects of local nonprofit organizations. Organizations in Northern Lower Michigan with 501(c)(3) nonprofit designations may request grant funds for programs that support the arts, education, environment and health & human services.

The deadline for letters of intent is Wednesday, June 1, 2011. Letters of intent should include:

1. The purpose of the project for which funds are required.

2. The community/regional impact of the project.

3. Preliminary budget and schedule of the project.

Preference will be given to proposals that will use Bay Harbor Foundation grant funds to match other charitable donations and for non-personnel related items.

Bay Harbor Foundation Program and Grant Committee will review letters of intent and will invite selected organizations by August 5, 2011 to submit application forms. Organizations invited to submit application forms will have until September 10, 2011 to complete the process. Grant award winners will be announced December 19, 2011.

Letters of intent may be e-mailed to info@bayharborfoundation.org or mailed to the Bay Harbor Foundation, 750 Bay Harbor Drive, Bay Harbor, MI 49770.

Grants for Non-Profits, Deadline June 1