Rural Initiative Grants, Deadline Oct. 3

THE LAURA JANE MUSSER FUND wants to encourage collaborative and participatory efforts among citizens in rural communities that will help to strengthen their towns and regions in a number of civic areas including, but not limited to, economic development, business preservation, arts and humanities, public space improvements, and education.

PRIORITY IS PLACED ON PROJECTS THAT:

Bring together a broad range of community members and institutions
Provide the opportunity for diverse community members to work together
Contain measurable short-term outcomes within the first 12 to 18 months
Include community members actively in all phases of the process
Work toward an outcome of positive change within their community

PROJECTS MUST DEMONSTRATE:

Support from a diverse cross-section of community members and institutions
Matching financial and/or in-kind support from the local community
Significant volunteer participation
Reasonable plans to complete the project within 18 months or less

LIMITS OF GEOGRAPHY:

Programs in Colorado, Hawaii, Michigan, Minnesota, Texas (Hidalgo, Cameron, Willacy, and Starr counties only), and Wyoming may apply
The applicant community must have a population of 10,000 or fewer and must be able to demonstrate rural characteristics of their location

FUNDS WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR:

Planning (up to $5,000) – These funds may support costs like: consultant or staff time, meeting costs, mailings, secretarial support, refreshments, local travel, childcare, etc. Note – this stage is optional and not a required phase prior to applying for or receiving an implementation grant. If an organization receives a planning grant from the Musser Fund, this in no way implies a commitment on the part of the Musser Fund to provide the organization with any subsequent implementation grant. But organizations that receive a planning grant may apply for subsequent implementation support after their planning activities are completed.

Implementation (Up to $25,000) – These funds are available to implement community based rural projects that originate in, have been planned by, and involve diverse people from the local community. The projects should result in a tangible outcome within at least the first 18 months.

Projects will be eligible for either planning or implementation funds during any one grant period.

WHAT THE PROGRAM WILL COVER:

New programs or projects within their first three years
A planning or implementation phase

WHAT WILL NOT BE FUNDED:

Capital campaigns and large capital expenses
General operating support
Ongoing program support

WHO CAN APPLY:

Nonprofit 501(c)(3) organizations
Local units of Government

Contact us for more information about this program. To learn more about GFA please visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

Rural Initiative Grants, Deadline Oct. 3

Food Processing Grants, Deadline Nov. 7

The Michigan Department of Agriculture & Rural Development (MDARD) is offering a
grant opportunity to promote the expansion of value-added agriculture production,
processing, and access within the state to enhance Michigan’s food and agriculture
industry.

MDARD will accept proposals that are intended to establish, retain, expand, attract
and/or develop value-added agricultural processing in Michigan; expand or develop regional food systems; or expand access to healthy food.

Funding Areas
Funding will be focused on the following types of projects:
Food hub development
Food access, including access to fresh/nutritional foods
Value-added food processing
Innovation and equipment
Technical assistance, including feasibility studies that lead to jobs/investment
Outreach and training

Grant Criteria
Grants will be awarded a maximum amount of $125,000. Applicants must provide a minimum 30% match.
Cash match is required, and in-kind contributions will not be counted as part of the required match.

Proposals are due Nov. 7. Contact us for more information on this grant program. To learn more about GFA visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

Food Processing Grants, Deadline Nov. 7

State Farm Good Neighbor Grants, Deadline Oct. 31

Good Neighbor Citizenship® Company Grants may be awarded to:

  • Educational institutions
  • Programs conducted by Municipal, county, state or federal government entities that align with State Farm’s charitable focus.
  • 501(c)(3) charitable nonprofit organizations
  • 501(c)(4) volunteer fire companies
  • 501(c)(6) chambers of commerce

State Farm grant applications for 2018 will be available beginning Friday, September 1, 2017 through Tuesday, October 31, 2017.

Nationally, we support communities through social investments and countrywide relationships. At a local level, our company grants focus on three areas: safety, education, and community development.

Safety Grants

State Farm values the importance of keeping our neighbors safe.

Funding is directed toward:

  • Auto and roadway safety
  • Teen Driver Education
  • Home safety and fire prevention
  • Disaster preparedness
  • Disaster recovery

Community Development

Strong neighborhoods are the foundation of a strong society. We’re committed to maintaining the vibrancy of our communities by assisting nonprofits that support: affordable housing, first time homeowners, neighborhood revitalization, financial literacy, job training, and small business development. Through community outreach and community development grants and investments, State Farm gives back to the neighborhoods it serves and helps develop stronger neighborhoods by reinvesting in the community. Our funding is directed toward:

  • Affordable Housing
  • Job training
  • Neighborhood Revitalization
  • Small business Development
  • Financial Literacy
  • First Time Homeownership

Education Grants

Additionally, we support efforts to provide all children with an education that will allow them to reach their greatest potential and prepare them to participate in a nation and economy that continues as a global leader. We fund three types of grants for K-12 public schools.

  • Teacher Development
  • Service-Learning
  • Education Reform/Systemic Improvement

Contact us for more details on this program. To learn more about GFA visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

State Farm Good Neighbor Grants, Deadline Oct. 31

Tribal Energy Capacity Grants, Deadline Oct. 9

A grant program is now open for proposals from federally recognized Indian Tribes, Alaska Native Villages, regional or village corporations, tribal organizations, and Tribal Energy Resource Development Organizations to build tribal capacity for energy resource development or management under the Department of the Interior’s Tribal Energy Development Capacity (TEDC) grant program.

For this program, capacity building refers to developing organizational structures, business entity structures, or developing or enhancing regulatory functions, all related to tribal energy development for the purpose of strengthening tribal capacity for development and management of energy projects. There is no cost-sharing requirement. Approximately 35 grants, from $1,000 to $300,000 are expected to be awarded.

Contact us for more information. To learn more about GFA visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

Tribal Energy Capacity Grants, Deadline Oct. 9

EPA Brownfield Assessment & Cleanup Grants, Deadline Dec. 20

The total funding available under the national competitions for Assessment and Cleanup Grants is estimated at $54 million subject to the availability of funds and other applicable considerations. EPA may expend up to 25 percent of the amount  appropriated for Brownfields Grants on sites contaminated with petroleum. EPA anticipates awarding an estimated 294 grants among assessment and cleanup grant types. Under this competitive opportunity, EPA anticipates awarding an estimated 60 Cleanup Grants for an estimated $12 million.

Proposals will be evaluated based, among other factors, on the extent to which the applicant demonstrates: economic and environmental needs of the target communities; a vision for the reuse and redevelopment of brownfield sites and the capability to achieve that vision; reasonable and eligible tasks and use of grant funding; incorporation of equitable and sustainable approaches; community engagement, partnerships and leveraged resources to complete the project; and economic, environmental, health, and social benefits associated with the reuse and redevelopment of brownfield sites.

Cleanup Grants provide funding to carry out cleanup activities at specific brownfield sites owned by the applicant. An applicant can apply for up to $200,000 per brownfield site and can submit up to three site-specific cleanup proposals. Applicants that exceed the maximum number of proposals allowable for Cleanup Grants will be contacted, prior to review of any of the proposals by EPA, to determine which proposals the applicant will withdraw from the competition. A separate proposal must be submitted for each site.

An applicant must be the sole owner of the site that is the subject of its Cleanup Grant proposal and must own the site by December 20, 2016, in order to be eligible to receive a cleanup grant. The Brownfields Law requires applicants to provide a 20 percent cost share for Cleanup Grants.

Contact us for more information. To learn more about GFA visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

EPA Brownfield Assessment & Cleanup Grants, Deadline Dec. 20

NEA Our Town Grants, Deadline Sept. 12

Organizations may apply for creative placemaking projects that contribute to the livability of communities and place the arts at their core. Our Town offers support for projects in two areas: • Arts Engagement, Cultural Planning, and Design Projects that represent the distinct character and quality of their communities. These projects require a partnership between a nonprofit organization and a local government entity, with one of the partners being a cultural organization. Matching grants range from $25,000 to $200,000.

Eligible Applicants:
Special district governments
Private institutions of higher education
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Independent school districts
State governments
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
County governments
City or township governments
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)

Application deadline is Sept. 12 and potential applicants would be advised to start work early! Contact us for more information. To learn more about GFA visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

NEA Our Town Grants, Deadline Sept. 12

Choice Neighborhood Planning Grants, Deadline Feb. 9

HUD is introducing Planning and Action Grants, a new type of planning grant award, in addition to the two-year Planning Grants.

Planning Grants are two-year grants that assist communities with severely distressed public or HUD-assisted housing in developing a successful neighborhood transformation plan and building the support necessary for that plan to be successfully implemented.
Planning and Action Grants are three-year planning grants that demonstrate a commitment to “doing while planning.” Experience shows that tangible, early actions help communities build momentum for further planning and the eventual transition from planning to implementation of that plan. These actions improve neighborhood confidence, which in turn sustains the community’s energy, attracts more engagement and resources, and helps convince skeptical stakeholders that positive change is possible.

Under these grants, the planning process activities would take place during the first 24 months of the grant period. The planning process will identify Action Activities that will be carried out during the latter portion of the grant period. Action Activities, as defined in section I.A.3.f, are physical improvement, community development, and economic development projects that enhance and accelerate the transformation of the neighborhood. Activities are limited to: reclaiming and recycling vacant property; beautification, place-making, and community arts projects; homeowner and business façade improvement programs; neighborhood broadband/Wi-Fi; and gap financing for economic development projects. Action Activities must build upon the planning for the target housing and neighborhood.

HUD is making available approximately $10 million in assistance through the FY2015/FY2016 Choice Neighborhoods program for Planning Grants and Planning and Action Grants. Under this publication, eligible applicants will apply for Planning and Action Grants. The top scoring applicants will be awarded Planning and Action Grants, and the next set of highest scoring applicants will be awarded Planning Grants, based on funding availability.

Contact us for more information. To learn more about GFA, visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

Choice Neighborhood Planning Grants, Deadline Feb. 9

Rural Development RCDI Grants, Deadline Aug. 13

This program provides funding to help non-profit housing and community development organizations support housing, community facilities, and community and economic development projects in rural areas. Qualified private, nonprofit and public including tribal intermediary organizations proposing to carry out financial and technical assistance programs will be eligible to receive the funding. The Intermediary will be required to provide matching funds in an amount at least equal to the RCDI grant. The respective minimum and maximum grant amount per Intermediary is $50,000 and $250,000. The Intermediary must provide a program of financial and technical assistance to recipients to develop their capacity and ability to undertake projects related to housing, community facilities, or community and economic development that will support the community.

What is an eligible area?
Rural areas including cities, villages, townships, towns and Federally Recognized Tribal Lands outside the boundaries of a city of 50,000 or more and its immediately adjacent urbanized area.

Eligible Applicants:
County governments
State governments
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Small businesses
Private institutions of higher education
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
Independent school districts
Special district governments
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
City or township governments

How may funds be used?
To improve housing, community facilities, and community and economic development projects in rural areas. Rural Community Development Initiative grants may be used for, but are not limited to:

Training sub-grantees to conduct:

  1. Home-ownership education
  2. Minority business entrepreneur education

Providing technical assistance to sub-grantees on

  1. Strategic plan development
  2. Accessing alternative funding sources
  3. Board training
  4. Developing successful child care facilities
  5. Creating training tools, such as videos, workbooks, and reference guides
  6. Effective fundraising techniques

What kind of funding is available?

  • Minimum grant award is $50,000; maximum grant award is $250,000
  • Grant funds are limited and are awarded through a competitive process

Are matching funds required?

  • Matching fund requirement equal to amount of grant
  • In-kind contributions cannot be used as matching funds
  • Partnerships with other federal, state, local, private and nonprofit entities are encouraged

Contact us for more information!

Rural Development RCDI Grants, Deadline Aug. 13

NEA Our Town Grants, Deadline Sept. 21

The Our Town grant program supports creative placemaking projects that help to transform communities into lively, beautiful, and resilient places with the arts at their core. Creative placemaking is when artists, arts organizations, and community development practitioners deliberately integrate arts and culture into community revitalization work – placing arts at the table with land-use, transportation, economic development, education, housing, infrastructure, and public safety strategies. This funding supports local efforts to enhance quality of life and opportunity for existing residents, increase creative activity, and create a distinct sense of place.

Through Our Town, subject to the availability of funding, the National Endowment for the Arts will provide a limited number of grants for creative placemaking. Our Town requires partnerships between arts organizations and government, other nonprofit organizations, and private entities to achieve livability goals for communities.

Our Town offers support for projects in two areas:

  • Arts Engagement, Cultural Planning, and Design Projects. These projects represent the distinct character and quality of their communities. These projects require a partnership between a nonprofit organization and a local government entity, with one of the partners being a cultural organization. Matching grants range from $25,000 to $200,000.
  • Projects that Build Knowledge About Creative Placemaking. These projects are available to arts and design service organizations, and industry or university organizations that provide technical assistance to those doing place-based work. Matching grants range from $25,000 to $100,000.

OUR TOWN: Arts Engagment, Cultural Planning, and Design Projects – Applicant Eligibility

All applications require partnerships that involve at least two primary partners: a nonprofit organization and a local governmental entity, as defined by these guidelines. One of the two primary partners must be a cultural (arts or design) organization. Additional partners are encouraged.

One of the two primary partners must act as the official applicant (lead applicant). This lead applicant must meet the eligibility requirements, submit the application, and assume full responsibility for the grant.

Eligible lead applicants are:

  • Nonprofit tax-exempt 501(c)(3) U.S. organizations with a documented three-year history of programming.
  • Local governments. For the purposes of these guidelines, local governments are defined as counties, parishes, cities, towns, villages, or federally recognized tribal governments. Local arts agencies or other departments, agencies, or entities within an eligible local government may submit the application on behalf of that local government. The following do not qualify as local governments: state level government agencies, other state-designated entities, state higher education institutions, regional governments and entities, quasi-government organizations, regional planning organizations, and business improvement districts.For U.S. territories, if no local government exists, the territory government can serve as the local government.

To be eligible, the lead applicant organization must:

  • Meet the Arts Endowment’s “Legal Requirements,” including nonprofit, tax-exempt status, at the time of application.
  • Have submitted acceptable Final Report packages by the due date(s) for all Arts Endowment award(s) previously received.

Additional partners are encouraged and may include an appropriate variety of entities such as arts organizations and artists, design professionals and design centers, state level government agencies, foundations, nonprofit organizations, educational institutions, real estate developers, business leaders, community organizations, council of governments, rural planning organizations, transportation agencies, special districts, educational organizations, as well as public and governmental entities. Federal agencies cannot be monetary partners.

The designated state and jurisdictional arts agencies (SAAs) and their regional arts organizations (RAOs) may serve as partners, but not primary partners, in projects. NEA funds can’t support any SAA or RAO costs. There is an exception for U.S. territories. The territory’s SAA may serve as the local government primary partner. However, all grant funds must be passed on to the other partners.

You may apply to other Arts Endowment funding opportunities, including Art Works and Challenge America, in addition to Our Town. In each case, the request must be for a distinctly different project, or a distinctly different phase of a project. If you have applied to the NEA in the past and were not recommended for funding, you may apply again to any funding opportunity, including Our Town.

NEA Our Town Grants, Deadline Sept. 21

Local Food Promotion Grants, Deadline May 14

Approximately $13 million in competitive grant funds in fiscal year (FY) 2015 is available for award through the Local Food Promotion Program (LFPP).  LFPP offers grant funds with a 25% match to support the development and expansion of local and regional food business enterprises to increase domestic consumption of, and access to, locally and regionally produced agricultural products, and to develop new market opportunities for farm and ranch operations serving local markets.

Eligible entities may apply if they support local and regional food business enterprises that process, distribute, aggregate, or store locally or regionally produced food products. Such entities may include agricultural businesses, agricultural cooperatives, producer networks, producer associations, community supported agriculture networks, community supported agriculture associations, and other agricultural business entities (for-profit groups); nonprofit corporations; public benefit corporations; economic development corporations; regional farmers’ market authorities; and local and tribal governments.

Two types of project applications are accepted under LFPP—planning grants and implementation grants. Applicants can apply for either but will receive only one type of grant in the same grant cycle.

LFPP Planning Grants are used in the planning stages of establishing or expanding a local and regional food business enterprise. Activities can include but are not limited to market research, feasibility studies, and business planning. A minimum of $5,000 and a maximum of $25,000 will be awarded for any one proposal, and the grants must be completed within a 12 month period.

LFPP Implementation Grants are used to establish a new local and regional food business enterprise, or to improve or expand an existing local or regional food business enterprise. Activities can include but are not limited to training and technical assistance for the business enterprise and/or for producers working with the business enterprise; outreach and marketing to buyers and consumers; and non-construction infrastructure improvements to business enterprise facilities or information technology systems.

A minimum of $25,000 and a maximum of $100,000 will be awarded for any one proposal, and the grants must be completed within a 24 month grant period. Contact us for more information!

Eligible Applicants:

1. Agricultural Business. A business entity that provides, holds, delivers, transports, offers, or sells agricultural products or services.

2. Agricultural Cooperative. A group-owned or member-owned entity or business that provides, offers, or sells agricultural products or services for the mutual benefit of their members.

3. Producer Network. A producer group- or member-owned organization or business that provides, offers, or sells agricultural products or services through a common distribution system for the mutual benefit of their members.

4. Producer Associations. An organization or other business that assists, represents, or serves producers or a producer network.

5. Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) Network. A formal group of farms that work collectively to offer consumers regular (usually weekly) deliveries of locally-grown farm products during one or more harvest season(s), often on a subscription or membership basis. Customers have access to a selected share or range of farm products offered by the group of farmers based on partial or total advance payment of a subscription or membership fee.

6. CSA Associations. An organization or other business that assists or serves, represents, or services CSAs or CSA networks.

7. Local Government. Any unit of government within a state, including a county; borough; municipality; city; town; township; parish; local public authority, including any public housing agency under the United States Housing Act of 1937; special district; school district; intrastate district; council of governments, whether or not incorporated as a nonprofit corporation under state law; and any other agency or instrumentality of a multi-, regional, or intra-state or local government.

8. Nonprofit Corporation. Any corporation, trust, association, cooperative, or other organization, not including IHEs, that: (a) is operated primarily for scientific, educational, service, charitable, or similar purposes in the public interest; (b) is not organized primarily for profit; and (c) uses net proceeds to maintain, improve, or expand the operations of the organization.

9. Public Benefit Corporation. A corporation organized to construct or operate a public improvement, the profits from which inure to the benefit of a State(s) or to the people thereof.

10. Economic Development Corporation. An organization whose mission is the improvement, maintenance, development and/or marketing or promotion of a specific geographic area.

11. Regional Famers Market Authority. An entity that establishes and enforces regional, State, or county policies and jurisdiction over State, regional, or county farmers markets. 12. Tribal Government. A governing body or a governmental agency of any Indian tribe, band, nation, or other organized group or community (including any native village as defined in section 3 of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, 85 Stat. 688 (43 U.S.C. § 1602)) certified by the Secretary of the Interior as eligible for the special programs and services provided through the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Local Food Promotion Grants, Deadline May 14