Arts Capital Improvement Grants, Deadline June 1

The Capital Improvement grant category provides funding assistance to Michigan nonprofit arts and cultural organizations and municipalities for the expansion, renovation or construction of cultural facilities; upgrade of equipment and furnishing to provide a competitive and up-to-date environment; equipment and instrument acquisitions that are integral to the implementation of events and services. The improvements resulting from these grants enable citizens of all ages and abilities to enjoy more cultural events while increasing their participation within their communities.

Applicants must be a 501(c)3 and have matching funds. Applications are due June 1.

Contact us for more information.

 

Arts Capital Improvement Grants, Deadline June 1

Dow Community Grants, Deadline March 31

Michigan wildflowers

The companyGIVES Community Grant Program provides funding for projects that contribute to the success of local communities with the objective of making them better places to live and work. Grants are given to one-time projects that have the potential to provide visible, long-term, sustainable benefits for community members.

Eligibility

Applicants must be charitable or non-profit organizations with a 501(c)(3) designation. Faith-based non-profit organizations may qualify, provided their proposed project is for the benefit of the community as a whole rather than just the members of their congregation or organization.

Projects must be initiated by the non-profit organization and contribute to Dow’s global community success and local quality of life impact in at least one of the following areas:

  •     Education – Enhancing understanding of the roles of chemicals and plastics in the chemical industry or having the potential to increase interest in careers and opportunities linked to chemistry, technology, engineering, math and other sciences
  •     Community Success – Promotes economic development and job creation, meets community defined needs, provides permanent improvement to the social infrastructure of a disadvantaged or underprivileged section of the community or provides funding for materials or tools which will be widely available within a community or will offer long-term benefit to the community
  •     Sustainability and Innovation – Enhances or protects the natural environment or raises awareness among a broad public audience of environmental issues and relationship to social and economic consideration
  •     Quality of Life – Contributes to the physical and/or mental well-being of community residents

Projects should also align to local Community Success goals. To meet Dow’s goals for Community Success, requests for funding should also show how a proposed project will impact community residents and include details about how the community will learn of Dow’s involvement. A selection committee will review grant applications and choose grant recipients.

Applicants should request only the amount needed to fund the project.  Funding cannot be used for operating expenses, personal computers, travel expenses, dues, advertising, fund raising events, giveaways or prizes, individual scholarships, dues and memberships or lobbying expenses
If additional funding is required to complete the project, the funding sources must be secured and confirmed prior to applying for a Dow Community Grant
Application should not exceed 4 pages in length, including the project description and itemized budget.
Applications must be signed by the organization’s Executive Director or equivalent

What kinds of projects do not apply?

Those submitted by for-profit businesses, religious organizations for the sole benefit of the organization, individual sports teams, political organizations or candidates, labor unions, homeowners’ associations or individuals

Dow Community Grants, Deadline March 31

Museums for America Grant, Deadline Jan. 15

The goal of the Museums for America (MFA) program is to strengthen the ability of an individual museum to serve the public more effectively by supporting high-priority activities that advance its mission, plans, and strategic goals and objectives. MFA grants support activities that strengthen museums as active resources for lifelong learning, as important institutions in the establishment of livable communities, and as good stewards of the nation’s collections. MFA grants can fund both new and ongoing museum activities and programs. Examples include planning, managing and conserving collections, improving public access, training, conducting programmatic research, school and public programming, producing exhibitions, and integrating new or upgraded technologies into your operations.

There are three categories within the MFA program:

Learning Experiences IMLS places the learner at the center and supports engaging experiences in museums that prepare people to be full participants in their local communities and our global society. Projects should deliver high quality, inclusive, accessible and audience-focused programs, exhibitions, and services for lifelong learning in formal or informal settings.

Community Anchors IMLS promotes museums as strong community anchors that enhance civic engagement, cultural opportunities, and economic vitality. Projects should address common community challenges and demonstrate how your museum improves the quality of life and enriches community members’ knowledge and understanding of critical local and global issues, provides forums for community dialogue, and/or connects individuals to resources in the broader community service infrastructure through its programs and services. Projects may include capacity-building activities that position your museum to be more effective in fulfilling its role as a community anchor institution.

Collections Stewardship IMLS supports exemplary stewardship of museum collections and promotes the use of technology to facilitate discovery of knowledge and cultural heritage. Projects should support the care and management of collections to expand and sustain access for current and future generations. Projects should reflect systematic, holistic, logical approaches to the documentation, preservation, and conservation of tangible and digital collections to sustain and improve public access. Note to applicants: The FY 2013 Museums for America program now incorporates proposals previously solicited through the Conservation Project Support program.

To be eligible for an award under the FY2013 Museums for America program, you must be an organization that meets all three of the following criteria:

•You must be either a unit of State or local government or be a private nonprofit organization that has tax-exempt status under the Internal Revenue Code;

•You must be located in one of the 50 States of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, or the Republic of Palau; and

•You must qualify as one of the following: 1. A museum that, using a professional staff, is organized on a permanent basis for essentially educational or aesthetic purposes; owns or uses tangible objects, either animate or inanimate; cares for these objects; and exhibits these objects to the general public on a regular basis through facilities that is owns or operates.

What types of museums are eligible? Museums include, but are not limited to, aquariums, arboretums, art museums, botanical gardens, children’s/youth museums, general museums (those having two or more significant disciplines), historic houses/sites, history museums, natural history/anthropology museums, nature centers, planetariums, science/technology centers, specialized museums (limited to a single distinct subject), and zoological parks. What does it mean to be using a professional staff? An institution uses a professional staff if it employs at least one staff member, or the full-time equivalent, whether paid or unpaid, primarily engaged in the acquisition, care, or exhibition to the public of objects owned or used by the institution. What does it mean to exhibit the objects to the general public? An institution exhibits objects to the general public if such exhibition is a primary purpose of the institution. An institution that exhibits objects to the general public for at least 120 days a year is deemed to exhibit objects to the general public on a regular basis. An institution which does not have the exhibition of objects as a primary purpose and/or does not exhibit objects to the public for at least 120 days a year may be determined to be eligible as a museum under certain circumstances. For more information, please see 45 CFR §1180.2(d). 2. A public or private nonprofit agency which is responsible for the operation of a museum may apply on behalf of the museum.

Original Closing Date for Applications:     Jan 15, 2013
Current Closing Date for Applications:     Jan 15, 2013
Archive Date:     Feb 14, 2013
Funding Instrument Type:     Grant
Expected Number of Awards:     185
Award Ceiling:     $150,000
Award Floor:     $5,000
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement:     Yes

Contact us for more information!

Museums for America Grant, Deadline Jan. 15

Prime Time Family Reading Time Grants, Deadline May 15

For all new PRIME TIME Family Reading Time® programs, the Michigan Humanities Council will provide $9,000 to selected libraries to cover the majority of program expenses. Any public library system in the state of Michigan is eligible to apply to host a six-week PRIME TIME® series. A library system must commit to hosting a minimum of three PRIME TIME® series over a two-year period.

Deadline: May 15, 2012 for July 2012 training

Details on the Prime Time program are provided below:

The Michigan Humanities Council works with public libraries and public schools across the state to host PRIME TIME Family Reading Time® programs. PRIME TIME® is a six-week program of reading, discussion and storytelling that targets families of non-active library users. The program features award-winning children’s literature to stimulate discussion about humanities themes and issues encountered in everyday life. Since 2008, more than 6,700 Michigan children and parents have participated in PRIME TIME®.

Each session is 90 minutes and includes the reading of up to three books by a storyteller, followed by facilitated discussion with a humanities scholar. Programs typically serve 20 to 25 families comprised of parents and children ages 6-12 with separate pre-reading activities planned for children 5 and under. Programs may be presented in English or as a bilingual Spanish/English program.
PRIME TIME® Goals:

  •     Bond families around the act of reading and learning together;
  •     Reinforce the role of family;
  •     Encourage parents and children to read and discuss the humanities topics raised in the books;
  •     Help parents and children become active library users; and
  •     Highlight the importance of the library in local community and daily life.

PRIME TIME® is offered by the Michigan Humanities Council in cooperation with the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, and with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Library Association, Grand Haven Area Community Foundation – W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and additional corporate and private sponsors.
Who May Host a Program?

Any public library system or public school library in the state of Michigan is eligible to apply to host a six-week PRIME TIME® series. A library system or public school library must commit to hosting a minimum of three PRIME TIME® series over a two-year period. The second and third series may occur in the same library or at another library within the same system.

As of September 2011, there are 19 Michigan libraries who are hosting or have hosted the program through the Michigan Humanities Council. Those libraries are: Alpena County George N. Fletcher Public Library (Alpena), Cass District Library (Cassopolis), Charlevoix Public Library, Detroit Public Library – Campbell (Detroit), Detroit Public Library – Conley (Detroit), Hackley Public Library (Muskegon), Hamtramck Public Library (Hamtramck), Harper Woods Public Library (Harper Woods), Highland Twp. Public Library (Highland), Hoyt Public Library of the Saginaw Public Libraries (Saginaw), Jackson District Library – Carnegie Branch (Jackson), Lenawee County Library – Main Branch (Adrian), Loutit District Library (Grand Haven), Monroe County Library System – Navarre Branch (Monroe), Peter White Public Library (Marquette), Saginaw Butman Fish Library (Saginaw), South Haven Memorial Library, Stair Public Library (Morenci), and the Saginaw Chippewa Tribal Library (Mt. Pleasant.)
How Much Does PRIME TIME® Cost?

For all new PRIME TIME® programs, the Council will provide $9,000 to the library to cover the majority of program expenses. These expenses include a two-day mandatory training session for the library coordinator, scholar and storyteller in New Orleans, stipends for the scholar and storyteller, and a portion of the book costs. If your library has previously hosted PRIME TIME®, mini grants will be available up to $2,000. The library must provide a budget, which includes cash and in-kind cost share, to cover the remainder of the book costs as well as miscellaneous program expenses that will vary by site.
Additional Host Library Requirements:

  •     Identify a library coordinator who will attend a two-day training session in New Orleans along with a program scholar and storyteller (team responsibilities);
  •     Order and catalog program books from an approved PRIME TIME® syllabus;
  •     Promote PRIME TIME® according to Council guidelines and recruit 20-25 families;
  •     Provide credit to the Council in all promotional materials;
  •     Arrange for family transportation to and from the program as needed;
  •     Provide adequate space for meals/snacks, the PRIME TIME reading and discussion, and preschool activities;
  •     Provide a weekly five-minute “library commercial” to introduce families to additional library programs and  resources;
  •     Organize staff and resources for weekly preschool activities (a manual of suggested readings/activities is provided at the training in New Orleans);
  •     Issue library cards to all participating families;
  •     Complete and submit required reports to the Council upon conclusion of the program
  •     Administer and compile required participant surveys including entry, exit, and 90-day follow-up surveys;
  •     Provide cash and/or in-kind support for program costs not covered by Council funds;
  •     Present award certificates and gift books to families at program’s end.

Responsibilities of the Michigan Humanities Council

  •     Provide staff support and technical assistance regarding PRIME TIME®
  •     Act as intermediary between the library and the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities
  •     Assist in promotion and securing printed promotional materials
  •     Conduct site visits and program evaluation
  •     Assist library in identifying an appropriate scholar and storyteller as needed
  •     Write proposals for future funding
  •     Provide 30 reusable book bags
  •     Pay the required partnership fee to Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities ($500/site)

How your library can apply to host PRIME TIME®

Please submit a one-page letter of interest to the attention of Robin Soergel, Education Programs and Outreach Officer (rsoergel@mihumanities.org, phone: 517-372-7770) to be considered. For new PRIME TIME® sites, please consider the following in the letter of interest:

Name of the library/system;
Community demographics supporting need for PRIME TIME® in your area;
Examples of prior literacy and/or reading and discussion family programs hosted by your library;
Partnering agencies that could assist your library to recruit non-library-using families and volunteer support.
Submit a proposed budget

Prime Time Family Reading Time Grants, Deadline May 15

Stop by and say hi at the Small Business Showcase this Wednesday!

We’re very happy to say that we’re a TC Chamber 2012 Small Business of the Year nominee. We hope you’ll take a minute this Wednesday afternoon (5:30-7:30 pm) to stop by the Hagerty Center and say hi. Admission is free and you can get a look at the other great nominees as well.

http://tcchamber.org/leadership-development/transform-your-organization/small-business-celebration/

We hope to see you there!

In the meantime, today’s featured grant is the Farm to School program.

The MI Farm to School Grant Program awards Michigan K-12 schools/districts with funds ($2,000 maximum each) to plan for or implement farm to school programs. With funding from the WK Kellogg Foundation, this program is coordinated by the MSU Center for Regional Food Systems, formerly the C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Food Systems. The application period for the second grant year (September 1, 2012 – June 1, 2013) is now open! Applications are due by 5 pm EST on Friday, May 4, 2012.

  • The MI Farm to School Planning Grant helps K-12 schools and Pre-K programs plan for integrating fresh, local foods into cafeterias AND ultimately develop a Farm to School Action Plan to implement a farm to school program.

    Examples of ways funding may be used include but are not limited to the following:

    • Meeting expenses for gathering farmers, food service professionals, students, parents, community members, etc.
    • Trainings/learning opportunities (i.e. fresh food prep, knife skills, seasonal menu planning, etc.) in addition to those required for grantees
    • Fees associated with attending conferences related to farm to school, local agriculture, food systems, etc.
    • Costs associated with co-learning opportunities, student engagement, school wellness committee engagement, etc.
    • Purchase of kitchen or cafeteria equipment (up to $500) to help prepare and serve fresh, local produce
  • The MI Farm to School Implementation Grant helps schools put existing farm to school plans into action AND ultimately develop a Farm to School Sustainability Plan to keep a farm to school program going and growing in future years.

    Examples of ways funding may be used include but are not limited to the following:

    • Purchase of kitchen or cafeteria equipment, resources or materials that will help to increase the use of local foods in the school food service program
    • Purchase of fresh, local food products to use in the school food service program
    • Costs associated with co-learning opportunities, student engagement, school wellness committee engagement, etc.
    • Marketing materials for fresh, local foods in school cafeterias (i.e. posters, line tags, etc.)
    • On-going training or learning opportunities for food service staff to utilize fresh, local foods

Eligibility:

  • The school food service program must have at least 50% free and reduced-price meal enrollment at the time this application is completed. A goal of this program is to help vulnerable children find more local, healthy food choices in school meals programs.
  • Only school food service/nutrition directors can apply for their school district(s) or school(s). Food service directors from a school district may choose to focus on a few school buildings or an entire school district’s food service program, but the district must have 50% free and reduced price meal enrollment. Private or charter schools may apply as an individual school.
  • Only one application for either the planning or implementation grant (not both) is allowed per pre-K program, school or district per grant year.
  • Pre-K and early childcare programs are eligible only for planning grants. The program must be eligible to receive Tier 1 reimbursement rates for at least 50% of program participants (as indicated by current Child and Adult Care Food Program eligibility) to apply. Private or charter school and early childcare programs servicing children from birth-5 may apply as individual grantees. Childcare programs solely contracting with a school/district for all meals programs must apply in partnership with the school/district food service/nutrition director.

Contact us for more details!

Stop by and say hi at the Small Business Showcase this Wednesday!

Artist Community Grants, Deadline March 8

ARTIST COMMUNITIES: Art Works

Introduction

The NEA’s guiding principle is embodied in one sentence: “Art works.”

“Art works” is a noun; the creation of works of art by artists. “Art works” is a verb; art works on and within people to change and inspire them. “Art works” is a statement; arts jobs are real jobs that are part of the real economy.

Art Works encourages and supports the following four outcomes:

  • Creation: The creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence,
  • Engagement: Public engagement with diverse and excellent art,
  • Learning: Lifelong learning in the arts, and
  • Livability: The strengthening of communities through the arts.

You will be asked to select the outcome that is most relevant to your project, and you also will be able to select a secondary outcome (note that all Arts Education applicants must choose the Learning outcome as their primary outcome). When making selections, you should identify the outcome(s) that reflect the results expected to be achieved by your project. If you receive a grant, you also will be asked to provide evidence of those results.

  1. Creation: The portfolio of American art is expanded.Support is available for projects to create art that meets the highest standards of excellence across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. Through the creation of art, these projects are intended to replenish and rejuvenate America’s enduring cultural legacy. Creation activities may include:
    • Commissioning, development, and production of new work.
    • Design competitions and design or planning projects for new arts or cultural spaces or landscapes.
    • Workshops and residencies for artists where the primary purpose is to create new art.
    • Opportunities for writers and translators to create or refine their work.
    • Projects that employ innovative forms of art-making and design.

    You will be asked to address the anticipated results in your application. If you receive a grant, you will be asked to provide evidence of those results at the end of your project. You will need to provide evidence of the new art works created. If the project activities do not lead to the creation of completed works of art within the period of a grant, you may demonstrate progress toward the creation of art by describing the artists’ participation and work accomplished by the end of the grant. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Creation.

  2. Engagement: Americans throughout the nation experience art.Support is available for projects that provide public engagement with artistic excellence across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. These projects should engage the public directly with the arts, providing Americans with new opportunities to have profound and meaningful arts experiences. Engagement activities may include:
    • Exhibitions, performances, concerts, and readings.
    • Film screenings.
    • Touring and outreach activities.
    • Restaging of repertory and master works of historical significance.
    • Art fairs and festivals.
    • Documentation, preservation, and conservation of art work.
    • Public programs that raise awareness of cultural heritage.
    • Broadcasts on television or radio; video games; mobile apps; live streaming, audio- and video-on-demand, podcasts, MP3 files, or other digital applications.
    • Design charrettes.
    • Publication, production, and promotion of digital, audio, mobile, or online publications; books; magazines; catalogues; and searchable information databases.
    • Services to artists and arts organizations.
    • Projects that extend the arts to underserved populations — those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability.
    • Projects that employ innovative forms of art and design delivery.

    You will be asked to address the anticipated results in your application. If you receive a grant, you will be asked to provide evidence of those results at the end of your project. You will need to describe the participants’ experiences as well as the composition of the participant group. If the nature of the project does not allow for the documentation of participants’ experiences explicitly, you may document the composition of the participant group and numbers of participants and activities, and describe the activities used to engage the public with art. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Engagement.

  3. Learning: Americans of all ages acquire knowledge or skills in the arts.Support is available for projects that provide Americans of all ages with arts learning opportunities across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. These projects should focus on the acquisition of knowledge or skills in the arts, thereby building public capacity for lifelong participation in the arts. Learning activities may include:
    • Lifelong learning activities for children, adults, and intergenerational groups.
    • Standards-based arts education activities for pre-K-12 students.
    • Informal education programs, workshops, and demonstrations.
    • Mentorships and apprenticeship programs.
    • Professional development for artists, teaching artists, teachers, and other education providers.
    • Assessments and evaluations of arts learning.
    • Online courses or training.
    • Lectures and symposia.
    • Production, publication, and distribution of teachers’/facilitators’ guides.
    • Innovative practices in arts learning for Americans of all ages.

    You will be asked to address the anticipated results in your application. If you receive a grant, you will be asked to provide evidence of those results at the end of your project. You will need to describe the participants’ learning, the composition of the participant group, and the numbers of participants and activities, as well as the activities used to facilitate the acquisition of knowledge or skills in the arts. If you receive support through the Arts Education discipline for a standards-based project, you will be required to report on additional measurable results, including identifying specific learning outcomes, describing the assessment method, and reporting on the number of participants who demonstrated learning. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Learning. In addition to a Final Descriptive Report and Federal Financial Report, Arts Education grantees will be required to submit assessment tools with their Final Report.

  4. Livability: American communities are strengthened through the arts. Support is available for projects that incorporate the arts and design into strategies to improve the livability of communities. Livability consists of a variety of factors that contribute to the quality of life in a community such as ample opportunities for social, civic, and cultural participation; education, employment, and safety; sustainability; affordable housing, ease of transportation, and access to public buildings and facilities; and an aesthetically pleasing environment. The arts can enhance livability by providing new avenues for expression and creativity. Arts- and design-related Livability activities may include:
    • The development of plans for cultural and/or creative sector growth.
    • The enhancement of public spaces through design or new art works.
    • Arts or design activities that are intended to foster community interaction in public spaces.
    • Cultural sustainability activities that contribute to community identity and sense of place.
    • The inclusion of artists, designers, and/or arts organizations in civic engagement activities and plans and processes to improve community livability and enhance the unique characteristics of a community.
    • Innovative community-based partnerships that integrate the arts with livability efforts.

    Please note that certain types of Livability activities will require applicants to provide information in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and/or the National Historic Preservation Act. See here for more information.

    The anticipated long-term results for Livability projects are measurable community benefits, such as growth in overall levels of social and civic engagement; arts- or design-focused changes in policies, laws, and/or regulations; job and/or revenue growth for the community; and changes in in-and-out migration patterns. You will be asked to address the anticipated results in your application. If you receive a grant, you will be asked to provide evidence of those results at the end of your project. Given the nature of Livability projects, benefits are likely to emerge over time and may not be fully measureable during the period of a grant. You will need to provide evidence of progress toward achieving improved livability as appropriate to the project. Reporting requirements for Livability are different from — and more extensive than — the reporting requirements for the other outcomes. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Livability.

Innovation

The NEA recognizes that arts and design organizations are often in the forefront of innovation in their work and strongly encourages innovation within the outcomes listed above. Innovative projects are characterized as those that:

  • Are likely to prove transformative with the potential for meaningful change, whether in the development or enhancement of new or existing art forms, new approaches to the creation or presentation of art, or new ways of engaging the public with art;
  • Are distinctive, offering fresh insights and new value for their fields and/or the public through unconventional solutions; and
  • Have the potential to be shared and/or emulated, or are likely to lead to other innovations.

*                      *                        *                      *                      *

Partnerships can be valuable to the success of these projects. While not required, applicants are encouraged to consider partnerships among organizations, both in and outside of the arts, as appropriate to their project.

The Arts Endowment also is interested in projects that extend the arts to underserved populations — those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability. This is achieved in part through the use of Challenge America funds.

Please note: The Art Works category does not fund direct grants to individuals. Direct grants to individuals are offered only in the category of Literature Fellowships.

Project Reporting and Evaluation

We ask all applicants to define what they would like to achieve, how they will assess the degree to which it is achieved, and, upon completion of the project, what they have learned from their experiences. Such feedback need not entail large-scale or expensive evaluation efforts. You should do what is feasible and appropriate for your organization and project. When a grant is completed, you must submit a final report and answer questions on your achievements and how these were determined. Arts Education grantees must submit assessment tools with their Final Report. (Please note that assessment tools may be shared publicly. If your tools are proprietary and have copyrights or trademarks attached, you will be asked to note that in your Final Report.) Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for the outcome that will be selected for the proposed project: Creation, Engagement, Learning, or Livability.

Beyond the reporting requirements for all grantees, selected Art Works grantees will be asked to assist in the collection of additional information that can help the NEA determine the degree to which agency objectives were achieved. You may be contacted to provide evidence of project accomplishments including, but not limited to, work samples, community action plans, cultural asset studies, programs, reviews, relevant news clippings, and playbills. Please remember that you are required to maintain project documentation for three years following submission of your final reports.

For a random sample of grants involving the presentation of art, selected grantees will be required to conduct surveys of audience members to gauge the nature and extent of audience response to these art experiences. Grantees selected to conduct surveys will receive materials, technical assistance, and up to $1,000 in nonmatching supplemental funding from the NEA. If you are selected, you will be notified of your participation at the time of grant award.

Deadline

The application deadline for all artist community projects is March 8, 2012. (There is no August deadline.) The earliest beginning date for the Arts Endowment’s period of support is January 1, 2013.

The Art Works category provides support for projects that address the following outcomes (in bold below). You will be asked to indicate the outcome that is most relevant to your project in your application and on the application form (you also will be able to select a secondary outcome).

Creation

  • Stipends and living accommodations for professional artists where the primary purpose is to create new art.
  • The expansion of the pool of artists that encourages the participation of artists from a wide variety of aesthetic viewpoints, ethnic backgrounds, or geographic areas where the primary purpose is to create new art.
  • Access to facilities or technology to meet the needs of interdisciplinary or new genre artists where the primary purpose is to create new art.
  • Innovative approaches to serving as an incubator for the creation of art.
  • Innovative collaborations between artists and those from sectors outside of the arts (e.g., science) to create new art.

Engagement

  • Innovative uses of technology, media, or new models and activities with the surrounding community that provide the public with direct experiences with practicing artists and increase the visibility of the work of artists and the organization.
  • Innovative approaches to collaboration with outside organizations and disciplines where the primary purpose is public engagement with art.

Learning

  • Activities with the surrounding community that provide educational and related activities for children, adults, intergenerational groups, and schools. (If your project is for children and youth, see “Choosing the Right Discipline for Children and Youth Projects” to help you in your discipline selection.)
  • Residency exchange programs with artists and artist communities in other countries where the primary purpose is the acquisition of knowledge or skills in the arts.

Livability

  • The development of artist live/work spaces.
  • The enhancement of public spaces through commissioning and/or installation of works created by members of artist communities.
  • The engagement of artist communities in plans and processes to improve community livability.
  • Community-based partnerships that integrate artist communities with livability efforts.

(Applicants are strongly encouraged to contact staff if they are considering Livability as a primary outcome.)

Application Review

This category uses the agency’s traditional method of application review. Applications are submitted to the Artist Communities staff and are reviewed by a diverse group of experts in the artist community field.

Applications are reviewed on the basis of artistic excellence and artistic merit. For more detailed information on how artistic excellence and artistic merit will be evaluated, see the “Review Criteria.” You can find additional information in the “Application Review” section of the “Frequently Asked Questions.” See the “Application Calendar” for information on when we expect to announce grant awards and rejections.

Artist Community Grants, Deadline March 8

Great Lakes Education Programs, Letters of Intent Due August 31

The Department of Commerce Great Lakes B-WET grant program is a competitively based program that supports existing environmental education programs, fosters the growth of new programs, and encourages the development of partnerships among environmental education programs throughout the Great Lakes watershed. Projects support organizations that provide students “meaningful” watershed educational experiences and teachers professional development opportunities in the area of environmental education, while helping to support regional education and environmental priorities in the Great Lakes.

Original Closing Date for Applications:     Sep 30, 2011

Letters of Intent (LOIs) must be received by the Pacific Services Center by 5:59 p.m. Hawaii Time on August 31, 2011. LOIs must be emailed to < nos.psc.bwethawaii@noaa.gov > or received at the NOAA Pacific Services Center office through surface mail by the deadline. Full proposals must be received through Grants.gov no later than 11:59 p.m. ET / 5:59 p.m. Hawaii time, September 30, 2011. If applicants do not have Internet access and submit through surface mail, full proposals must be received no later than 5:59 p.m. Hawaii time, September 30, 2011. Failure to follow the guidelines as described in this announcement will deem a proposal incomplete and result in proposals not being considered for further review.

Current Closing Date for Applications:     Oct 07, 2011
Expected Number of Awards:     12

Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement:     No

Eligible Applicants

Eligible applicants are K-12 public and independent schools and school systems, institutions of higher education, community-based and nonprofit organizations, state or local government agencies, interstate agencies, and Indian tribal governments.

Great Lakes Education Programs, Letters of Intent Due August 31

People’s Garden Grant Program, Deadline August 26

The National Institute of Food & Agriculture (NIFA) announces the availability of grant funds and requests applications for the People’s Garden Grant Program (PGGP) for fiscal year (FY) 2011 to facilitate the creation of produce, recreation, and/or wildlife gardens in urban and rural areas, which will provide opportunities for science-based informal education. This program is a joint initiative supported by USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Food and Nutritional Service, Forest Service, and Natural Resources Conservation Service, in addition to NIFA. Successful applicants will provide micro-subgrant support to smaller local projects. This notice identifies the objectives for PGGP projects, the eligibility criteria for projects and applicants, and the application forms and associated instructions needed to apply for a PGGP grant. NIFA additionally requests stakeholder input from any interested party for use in the development of the next RFA for this program. In addition, in order to answer questions that you may have concerning this RFA and the pending project, NIFA will host a teleconference on Thursday, August 4, 2011 at 1:00 p.m. (Eastern Time). For those unable to participate in the call, NIFA will post a summary of the questions and the information provided to our website, http://www.nifa.usda.gov/funding/peoples_garden/peoples_garden.html. To participate in the teleconference, please call toll-free (888) 858-2144; the access code is 1059897.

Estimated Total Program Funding:    $725,000
Award Ceiling:    $150,000
Award Floor:
CFDA Number(s):    10.500  —  Cooperative Extension Service
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement:    Yes

  Eligible Applicants

  •     Independent school districts
  •     Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
  •     Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
  •     Private institutions of higher education
  •     Individuals
  •     For profit organizations other than small businesses
  •     Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)

Additional Information on Eligibility:
Eligible applicants are State agricultural experiment stations, State cooperative extension services, all colleges and universities, other research or education institutions and organizations, Federal and private agencies and organizations, non-profit organizations, individuals, and any other contractor or recipient. Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply provided such organizations are necessary for the implementation of the project. An applicant’s failure to meet an eligibility criterion by the time of an application deadline may result in the application being excluded from consideration or, will preclude NIFA from making an award.

People’s Garden Grant Program, Deadline August 26

4-H Grants, Deadline July 1

2011-12 County 4-H Innovative Grant Timeline

May 31, 2011: 2010-11 grant reports due to the State 4-H Office for programs conducted Oct. 1 to Apr. 30.
May 6, 2011:
Grants applications available
July 1, 2011:
Grant applications due
September 30, 2011: Grant recipients announced
September 30, 2011: 2010-11 grant reports due to the State 4-H Office for programs conducted May 1 to Aug. 31.
May 31, 2012:
2011-12 grant reports due to the State 4-H Office for programs conducted Oct. 1 to Apr. 30.
or September 30, 2012: 2011-12 grant reports due to the State 4-H Office for programs conducted May 1 to Aug. 31.

County Innovative Grant Application Packet & Form NOW AVAILABLE!

4-H County Innovative Grants offered for 2011-12:

The Michigan 4-H Foundation Board of Trustees annually approves the distribution of competitive grant funds to encourage development of innovative
4-H program opportunities in local communities. These grants are designed to encourage program planning and participation by 4-H members and volunteers in partnership with county MSU Extension 4‑H program staff members.

We are pleased to be able to offer eight grant opportunities for the 2011-12
4-H program year.

1. Michigan 4-H Legacy Grants

The purpose of the Michigan 4-H Legacy grants is to encourage creativity and support the implementation of great ideas that promote positive youth development in communities. Grants are available for Michigan 4-H volunteers, 4-H youth members and 4-H staff members to develop a new program or initiative or to strengthen, enhance or expand a current program that’s making a difference.  Innovative local projects that build on solid principles of positive youth development and expand 4-H opportunities for young people will be considered. These grants are funded by the Michigan 4-H Legacy Fund endowment. A total of two (2) $1,000 grants are currently available.

2. Dow Chemical County 4-H Youth Conservation Council Grants

The purpose of the Dow Chemical County 4-H Youth Conservation Council Grant is to encourage and support development of county-based youth conservation councils. County youth conservation councils consist of a group of teens, ages 13 to 19, who have an interest in learning about local environmental issues and influencing public policy in their county, city or township governments. Applicants for the Dow Chemical County 4-H Youth Conservation Council mini-grant must be willing to engage youth representing multi-ethnic communities in this leadership opportunity that provides environmental stewardship education and advocacy and also encourages the use of technology as a learning, research and presentation tool. Currently five (5) grants valued at $1,000 in training, curriculum and financial support are available. Each grantee will receive $750 in cash to develop a county-based 4-H youth conservation council and $250 in required training scholarships and handbook for developing a local council. These grants are funded by the Dow Chemical Company Foundation.

3. 4-H On-Target County Grant

The On-Target County Grant is designed to help county 4-H Shooting Sports programs enhance existing programs, develop a new program or offer a special experience related to 4-H Shooting Sports. Thanks to the generous support of Thomas Cobb, former Michigan 4-H Foundation president, counties have an opportunity to apply for funds in this area each year. Two (2) $500 grants are available.

4. NorthStar Cooperative 4-H Dairy Science Grant

The NorthStar Cooperative 4-H Dairy Science grants offer opportunity for 4-H youth and volunteers working in 4-H Dairy Science to strengthen existing county 4-H dairy science programs or use as seed money to develop new innovations in the way 4-H Dairy Science learning takes place for young people. Thanks to the generous support of the members of NorthStar Cooperative, Inc., county or state 4-H groups have opportunity to apply for funds to advance their learning. Two (2) $500 grants are available.

5. OMEDA Youth Tractor Safety Education Grants

Helping families living and working on farms develop youth tractor safety practices is the purpose of the Ohio-Michigan Equipment Dealers Association (OMEDA) grants for county MSU Extension educators. 4-H youth staff members are encouraged to partner with their county MSUE agricultural educators and volunteers to offer learning experiences that promote safe tractor operations. These grants are funded by a gift from the Ohio-Michigan Equipment Dealers Association. Two (2) $250 grant awards are currently available.

6. Ousterhout Regional or District Teen Leadership Training Grant

This grant is offered every other year to provide support for the addition of a teen leadership training focus to any regional or district 4-H volunteer training event. The grant can be used to provide scholarships for teens to attend a relevant regional or district volunteer training event, or to support the addition of a specific teen leadership focus to a regional or district event. This grant is made possible by the Ousterhout Regional Endowment and the Turner-Outsterhout Endowment for Teen Leadership Training. One (1) $500 grant is available.

7. Michigan 4-H Outbound International Travel Grants (New This Year!)

These grants are awarded to 4-H youth who have applied and been accepted to travel as part of a Michigan 4-H sponsored outbound international travel experience such as Labo, IFYE, Poland, Belize or other Michigan 4-H sponsored international travel opportunities. These travel scholarships are provided with support from the Michigan Division, Woman’s National Farm and Garden Association, raised annually through their International Tea; and the Michigan 4-H International Endowment Fund created with gifts from Michigan 4-H IFYE alumni and other donors. Four (4) $500 travel scholarships are available for 2011 travel experiences.

Those receiving scholarships will be required to complete the following as part of their scholarship requirements:

  • Write an article (1-2 pages or more) on one or more concepts learned through the travel program.  Submit at least two good photos with the article (completed by September 15).

  • Develop a display poster on your experience.  This should include photos and information telling about your experience. (Completed by October 1).

  • Give a talk/report to two or more groups in your county.  These may include 4-H groups, service clubs (i.e. Kiwanis, Rotary), grange, school classrooms, etc. (completed by December 1).

  • A scholarship winner must attend and do a presentation at the Woman’s National Farm and Garden Association International Tea in the first September after their return.

  • Scholarship applications are only made available to 4-H members approved for international travel each 4-H program year.

8. 4-H Educational Garden Grant

The purpose of 4-H Educational Garden Grants is to stimulate the creation of local 4-H educational gardens in Michigan. This program will increase the opportunities for high quality and high visibility 4-H programming in communities, will create a connection for youth and 4-H volunteers to resources from the Michigan 4-H Children’s Garden and will encourage creative 4-H volunteer leadership in communities.  These grants are made possible by the Albert A. Albright Endowment for Plant Science and Gardening Education. Currently two (2) $1,000 grants are available. An award could be made in subsequent years to the same project. Other requirements are:

  • Gardens must be in public places but not necessarily on public property. 4-H centers, YMCAs and other community centers, fairgrounds, places of worship, parks and schools are examples of suitable places.

  • The garden must use the 4-H name and must follow appropriate use of the 4-H emblem as stated online at http://www.national4-hheadquarters.gov/4h_name.htm. The garden planners/managers will commit to a set of educational programs that involve 4-H members and other children with the garden for a minimum number of years. The curator of the Michigan 4-H Children’s Garden and/or designee will visit any funded local 4-H garden at least once in the initiation phase and on future occasions as arranged.

  • Every effort will be made to link the local 4-H educational gardens with the Michigan 4-H Children’s Gardens through technology and on-site visits to the MSU campus gardens.

  • For creative ideas, we encourage you to visit the Michigan 4-H Children’s Garden at http://www.4hgarden.msu.edu or contact Norman Lownds, Curator of the Michigan 4-H Children’s Garden at Michigan State University at lownds@msu.edu or (517) 355-5191, ext. 1-349.

4-H Grants, Deadline July 1

Grants for Non-Profits, Deadline June 1

Bay Harbor Foundation Requests 2011 Grant Applications

Bay Harbor, MI – The Bay Harbor Foundation is requesting letters of intent for 2011 projects of local nonprofit organizations. Organizations in Northern Lower Michigan with 501(c)(3) nonprofit designations may request grant funds for programs that support the arts, education, environment and health & human services.

The deadline for letters of intent is Wednesday, June 1, 2011. Letters of intent should include:

1. The purpose of the project for which funds are required.

2. The community/regional impact of the project.

3. Preliminary budget and schedule of the project.

Preference will be given to proposals that will use Bay Harbor Foundation grant funds to match other charitable donations and for non-personnel related items.

Bay Harbor Foundation Program and Grant Committee will review letters of intent and will invite selected organizations by August 5, 2011 to submit application forms. Organizations invited to submit application forms will have until September 10, 2011 to complete the process. Grant award winners will be announced December 19, 2011.

Letters of intent may be e-mailed to info@bayharborfoundation.org or mailed to the Bay Harbor Foundation, 750 Bay Harbor Drive, Bay Harbor, MI 49770.

Grants for Non-Profits, Deadline June 1