Scrap Tire Grants, Deadlines Sept. 28 & Oct. 19

MDEQ grant program is open! Scrap tires pose a fire risk and a human health risk as mosquito breeding grounds. Through grants, scrap tires can be processed and used in paving products for roads, manufactured products and energy production.  

The Scrap Tire Cleanup Grant is available for property owners to clean up old or abandoned scrap tire piles. The MDEQ will give priority to collection sites where tires were accumulated prior to January 1, 1991, as well as collection sites that pose an imminent threat to public health, safety, welfare or the environment. Local units of government and non-profit organizations are also eligible for funding for cleanup days and roadside cleanup grants.  

The Market Development Grants are available to fund up to 50 percent of total eligible costs for projects that demonstrate new or increased uses of scrap tires in manufactured products. The MDEQ will prioritize proposals based on the amount of scrap tire material being used in developing the project or product, demonstration of a new use of scrap tire material and demonstration of a viable market for a proposed product.

The Scrap Tire Law Enforcement Grants are available to the law enforcement community for the purchase, installation and implementation of surveillance equipment used to reduce or eliminate instances of illegal dumping of scrap tires.  

The MDEQ will accept Cleanup Grant Applications with all supporting documentation received on or before Friday, September 28, 2018. Market Development and Law Enforcement Grant Applications will be accepted with all supporting documentation on or before Friday, October 19, 2018. 

Contact us for more information. To learn more about GFA please visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

Scrap Tire Grants, Deadlines Sept. 28 & Oct. 19

MDNR Aquatic Habitat Grant Program, Deadline Aug. 27 (Pre-Proposals)

Projects that focus on affecting key processes, as opposed to treating symptoms, will be given priority. Key processes include hydrology, connectivity, material recruitment and movement, geomorphology, and water quality.

Eligibility: Any local, state, federal, or tribal units of government, or non-profit groups.

Application Process:

  • Submittal of a pre-proposal
  • Evaluation by DNR staff
  • Submittal of a full grant application (invitation based)
  • Evaluation by DNR staff
  • Final approval of grant awards by the DNR Director

Invitation to submit full applications begins late September
Full applications due mid-November
Awards announced by mid-April
Project period begins upon execution of grant agreement
Project periods are one and a half years (two construction seasons)

Grant Limits:

Minimum grant request amount: $25,000
Maximum grant request amount: Amount of funds appropriated in a given fiscal year, typically around $1.25 million
Minimum match of 10% is required

 

MDNR Aquatic Habitat Grant Program, Deadline Aug. 27 (Pre-Proposals)

Underground Tank Cleanup Funds

The Public Highway Program allows local units of government or county road commissions to be reimbursed for certain costs related to the management, relocation, or disposal of media that had been contaminated by a release or releases from a refined petroleum underground storage tank system or systems.

Claim Eligibility

A claim may only be by filed by a local unit of government or county road commission. For a claim to be eligible, there must be a completed institutional control in place for the public highway pursuant to Section 21310a of Part 213, Leaking Underground Storage Tanks of the Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act, 1994 PA 451, as amended.  A copy of the completed institutional control must be provided with the claim submittal.

The program will accept claims for local reimbursement of up to $200,000. Contact us for more information. To learn more about GFA visit our website at http://gfa.tc

Underground Tank Cleanup Funds

MDNR Invasive Species Grants, Deadline June 13

Funding proposals for 2017 now are being accepted through the Michigan Invasive Species Grant Program, with an anticipated $3.6 million available to applicants. The program – a joint effort of the Michigan departments of Natural Resources, Environmental Quality, and Agriculture and Rural Development – is part of a statewide initiative launched in 2014 to help prevent and control invasive species in Michigan.

Proposals to advance methods of aquatic invasive plant control are being sought in 2017, as well as those undertaking surveillance for emerging or potential infestations of hemlock woolly adelgid, balsam woolly adelgid, thousand cankers disease and/or Asian longhorned beetle in Michigan.

Invasive species prevention activities are highlighted in this year’s program, including those that reduce the risk of spreading invasive species through movement of firewood, a primary pathway for tree diseases and pests. Proposals addressing the spread of invasive species through recreational activities including land and water trail use, boating, angling, hunting and camping, also are encouraged.

Local, state, federal and tribal units of government, nonprofit organizations and universities may apply for funding to support invasive species projects conducted in Michigan. For this 2017 funding cycle, pre-proposals will be accepted through June 13 and requested full proposals must be submitted by Sept. 18.

Grant requests for 2017 projects can range from a minimum of $25,000 to a maximum of $400,000. Applicants must commit to provide 10 percent of the total project cost in the form of a local match.Competitive applications will outline clear objectives, propose significant ecological benefits, demonstrate diverse collaboration and show strong community support.
Contact us to learn more about this program. To learn more about GFA visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

MDNR Invasive Species Grants, Deadline June 13

GLRI Grants, Apps Due Jan. 13, 2017

Up To $26 Million Available From EPA for GLRI Projects

EPA anticipates funding projects in the following categories:

  • Great Lakes Taxonomy and Barcodes to Support Early Detection Monitoring (EPA-R5-GL2016-TAG)

EPA expects to provide up to approximately $1,600,000 for approximately 4 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $400,000 in EPA funding to support the taxonomic vouchering of invertebrate specimens and the development of reference barcodes.

  • Invasive Species Control (EPA-R5-GL2016-ISC)

EPA expects to provide up to approximately $10,000,000 for approximately 18 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $600,000 in EPA funding that control invasive species and initiate the long-term stewardship of project sites.

  • Foundations for Invasive Species Collaborations (EPA-R5-GL2016-FFC)

EPA expects to provide up to approximately $1,500,000 for approximately 5 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $300,000 in EPA funding that initiate species-specific Great Lakes invasive species management collaborations.

  • Phosphorus Risk Reduction Pilots in Western Lake Erie Agricultural Watersheds (EPA-R5-GL2016-PRR)

EPA expects to provide up to approximately $1,500,000 for approximately 5 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $500,000 in EPA funding for a pilot initiative that seeks to expand the tools available to farmers seeking to reduce phosphorus losses through a risk management approach.

  • Agricultural Watershed Management Implementation (EPA-R5-GL2016-AWM)

EPA expects to provide up to approximately $5,200,000 for approximately 10 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $750,000 in EPA funding to reduce nonpoint source pollution to the Great Lakes from agricultural sources.

  • Urban Watershed Management Implementation (EPA-R5-GL2016-UWM)

EPA expects to provide up to approximately $5,400,000 for approximately 13 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $500,000 in EPA funding to reduce nonpoint source pollution to the Great Lakes from urban sources.

  • Agricultural Incentive Program Effectiveness (EPA-R5-GL2016-AIP)

EPA expects to provide up to $750,000 in EPA funding for one cooperative agreement to undertake a socio-economic analysis of the effectiveness of current approaches intended to engage agricultural producers and change on-farm decision making to improve water quality in the GLRI Priority Watersheds (Lower Fox River, WI; Saginaw River, MI; Maumee River, OH; and Genesee River, NY).

A webinar explaining the grant application process will be held at 1 p.m. CST on Monday, Nov. 21, 2016.

For more information on this grant program contact us. To learn more about GFA please visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

 

GLRI Grants, Apps Due Jan. 13, 2017

Rural Energy for America Program, Deadline Jan. 31, 2017

Eligible applicants for the program are Agricultural Producers and Rural Small Businesses.

An estimated $50 million in Budget Authority is available in FY2017 to fund:

  • Grants for Renewable Energy Systems and Energy Efficiency Improvements
  • Guaranteed Loans for Renewable Energy Systems and Energy Efficiency Improvements
  • Grants to contact Energy Audits & Renewable Energy Development Assistance

Rural Small Business Projects must be located in a rural area with populations of 50,000 or less. The Agricultural Producer Projects can be located in rural or non-rural areas.

Application Deadlines for the year are as follows:

  • January 31, 2017       REAP Energy Audit & Renewable Energy Development Assistance Grants
  • March 31, 2017          Grants of $20,000 or Less   AND   Grants Greater than $20,000 (unrestricted)
  • Guaranteed Loans are on a continuous application cycle and compete monthly

Contact us for more information. To learn more about GFA visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

Rural Energy for America Program, Deadline Jan. 31, 2017

Great Lakes Fish & Wildlife Restoration Act Grants, Deadline Dec. 12

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is accepting Fiscal Year 2017 project proposals to protect, restore and enhance Great Lakes fish and wildlife habitat under the Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act (Act).  The six goals of the Act are:

1) Restoring and maintaining self-sustaining fish and wildlife resources.
2) Minimizing the impacts of contaminants on fishery and wildlife resources.
3) Protecting, maintaining, and, where degraded and destroyed, restoring fish and wildlife habitat, including the enhancement and creation of wetlands that result in a net gain in the amount of those habitats.
4) Stopping illegal activities adversely impacting fishery and wildlife resources.
5) Restoring threatened and endangered species to viable, self-sustaining levels.
6) Protecting, managing, and conserving migratory birds.

The Service requests interested entities to submit restoration, research and Regional project proposals for the restoration of Great Lakes fish and wildlife resources.  The purpose of the Act is to provide assistance to States, Indian Tribes, and other interested entities to encourage cooperative conservation, restoration and management of the fish and wildlife resources and their habitats in the Great Lakes Basin.  Supported in part by President Obama’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, a total of approximately $1.56 million is projected to be available to support projects this fiscal year.  Deadline for proposal submission is Monday, December 12, 2016 by 6:00 pm.

Contact us for more information. To learn more about GFA visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

Great Lakes Fish & Wildlife Restoration Act Grants, Deadline Dec. 12

Nonpoint Source Grants for Tribal Entities, Deadline Jan. 15

This RFP is issued pursuant to section 319(h) of the CWA. Section 319 of the CWA authorizes EPA to award grants to eligible tribes and intertribal consortia to implement approved NPS management programs developed pursuant to section 319(b). The primary goal of a NPS management program is to control NPS pollution through implementation of management measures and practices. These management practices should be directed at reducing polluted runoff from subcategories of NPSs identified in the tribe’s NPS assessment report developed pursuant to section 319(a).

After allocations for base grant work plans are made, EPA will allocate the remaining section 319 funds to eligible entities to develop and/or implement watershed-based plans and implement on-the-ground projects that will result in significant steps towards solving NPS impairments on a watershed-wide basis under the competitive procedures in this RFP. Though proposals are not required to include development and/or implementation of a watershed-based plan in order to be considered for funding, eligible entities are strongly encouraged to submit proposals that develop and/or implement watershed-based plans designed to protect unimpaired waters and restore NPS-impaired waters.

EPA is soliciting proposals pursuant to Section 319 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) from eligible tribes and intertribal consortia to develop and/or implement watershed-based plans and on-the-ground projects that will result in significant steps towards solving Nonpoint Source (NPS) impairments on a watershed-wide basis. Eligible entities are strongly encouraged to submit proposals that develop and/or implement watershed-based plans designed to protect unimpaired waters and/or restore NPS-impaired waters. Eligible tribes and intertribal consortia may apply for competitive funding by submitting a proposal for up to a maximum budget of $100,000 of federal CWA section 319 funding (plus the additional required 40% match of the total project cost).

Contact us for more information. To learn more about GFA visit us at http://gfa.tc.

Nonpoint Source Grants for Tribal Entities, Deadline Jan. 15

Joyce Foundation, Deadline December 1

The Joyce Foundation focuses grant making on initiatives that promise to have an impact on the Great Lakes region, specifically the states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The Environment Program is committed to speeding the Midwest’s transition to a thriving, low-carbon economy; protecting and restoring a healthy Great Lakes environment which sustains the millions of Americans and Canadians who live along and depend upon the Lakes; and broadening the base of support for strong environmental policies in our home region.

Great Lakes: The Joyce Foundation will seek and support funding opportunities to protect and restore the Great Lakes by considering proposals at the local, state, regional, and national levels that address the following areas:

  • Prevent the Introduction and Spread of Aquatic Invasive Species into and around the Great Lakes Basin
  • Strengthen federal and state ballast water policy.
  • Prevent movement of aquatic invasive species between Great Lakes and Mississippi River basins via Chicago Area Waterway.
  • Encourage a new vision for the St. Lawrence Seaway that may include modified operations.
  • Increase state collaboration on aquatic invasive species prevention and management.
  • Reduce Polluted Runoff from Cities and Farms
  • Reduce nonpoint source pollution from urban landscapes (Milwaukee).
  • Reduce nutrient pollution from agricultural landscapes (Western Lake Erie Basin).
  • Explore market based strategies for reducing polluted runoff from agricultural lands.
  • Explore legal and regulatory strategies for reducing polluted runoff from agricultural lands.
  • Support strategic pilots and policy shifts to promote green stormwater infrastructure.
  • Promote water quality monitoring, science, and research.

Grant proposals are considered at meetings of the Foundation’s Board of Directors in April, July, and December. Deadline dates are:
Proposal Deadline August 19, 2015; Board Meeting December 1, 2015
Proposal Deadline December 2015; Board Meeting April 2016

Contact us for more information. For more information on GFA visit us at gfa.tc.

Joyce Foundation, Deadline December 1

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Funding, Deadline Sept. 28

This Request for Applications (RFA) solicits applications from eligible entities for grants and/or cooperative agreements to be awarded pursuant to the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Action Plan II ( http://greatlakesrestoration.us/actionplan/pdfs/glri-action-plan-2.pdf).  This RFA is EPA’s major competitive grant funding opportunity under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (“GLRI” or “Initiative”) for FY 2015 and is one of several funding opportunities available through federal agencies under the GLRI.  Applications are requested for projects within the five categories listed below.

Invasive Species Prevention (EPA-R5-GL2015-ISP)

The Great Lakes remain vulnerable to the introduction of new invasive species. A number of pathways, such as ballast water from commercial shipping, are being addressed through regional and national programs. However, innovative approaches are still needed to reduce the risk from a variety of pathways including, but not limited to, movement through canals and waterways; accidental contamination of nursery, water garden, and live bait products; uninformed use of invasive species in landscaping and water gardens; and internet sales of invasive species. EPA expects to provide approximately $2.5 million for approximately 5 to 8 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $500,000 that block pathways of invasive species introductions into the Great Lakes ecosystem.

Projects submitted in this category must implement activities that actively reduce the risk of introduction of invasive species, as opposed to projects that perform basic research or “proof of concept” testing of prevention methodologies/technologies.

Invasive Species Control (EPA-R5-GL2015-ISC)

Progress toward restoring the Great Lakes has been significantly undermined by the effects of non-native invasive species. However, many invasive species can be controlled to reduce their impacts on the Great Lakes ecosystem. There is an ongoing need for enhancing the capacity for managing invasive species in the Great. Funding for on-the-ground and in-the-water control projects can greatly assist ecological restoration and help create long-term stewardship programs. Applicants are responsible for the maintenance of these significantly improved project sites after the initial funding period has ended.

EPA expects to provide approximately $5,200,000 for approximately 8 to 12 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $650,000 that control invasive species and initiate long-term stewardship of project sites.  Projects submitted in this category must implement on-the-ground and/or in-the-water invasive species control actions and result in acres of invasive species controlled, rather than perform basic research or “proof of concept” testing of control methodologies/technologies. Up to 20% of the federal share of the project budget may be used to retreat areas that were previously treated by GLRI-funded projects.

Urban Watershed Management Implementation (EPA-R5-GL2015-UWM)

Nearshore water quality has increasingly become degraded, as evidenced by excessive nutrients; harmful algal blooms; mats of Cladophora on beaches; avian botulism; and beach closings. Causes of these problems include excessive nutrient loadings from both point and nonpoint sources, bacteria and other pathogens, development and shoreline hardening, agricultural practices, failing septic systems, improper grey-water discharge, increased frequency and intensity of storm events due to climate change, and invasive species. Nonpoint sources are now the primary contributors of many pollutants to the Great Lakes and their tributaries. Implementation of best management practices addressing those sources can have multiple benefits, including simultaneous reductions in runoff of soils, nutrients, pesticides, and other nonpoint source pollutants.

EPA expects to provide approximately $2,700,000 for approximately 6 to 10 projects to reduce nonpoint source pollution from urban areas to the Great Lakes.  The maximum amount of federal funds that will be awarded for any project in this category is $500,000. For the purposes of this announcement, an eligible urban watershed is defined as including urban and downtown areas, city neighborhoods, suburban municipalities, and exurban communities and unincorporated areas characterized by encroaching urban sprawl where the urban land use has a documented impact on water quality. Proposed project locations must be located within the same HUC12 subwatershed where the documented water quality problem occurs.

Projects submitted in this category must address an urban nonpoint source problem. Proposals are limited to projects implementing an urban component(s) of existing watershed-based plans that are consistent with the components outlined in EPA’s Nine Elements Guidance. Such plans are designed to address documented nonpoint source-related water quality problems and to help prevent future nonpoint source water quality-related problems. The plans are based upon sound science and evaluation techniques; have measurable outcomes; are developed with stakeholder/public involvement; and leverage additional resources. See the following links for approved Nine-Element Watershed Management Plans or information about the plans:

•  Michigan: http://www.michigan.gov/deq/0,1607,7-135-3313_3682_3714—,00.html (Follow the NPS  Approved and Pending Watershed Plans link.)

Agricultural Watershed Management Implementation (EPA-R5-GL2015-AWM)

Nearshore water quality has become degraded, as evidenced by excessive nutrients; harmful algal blooms; mats of Cladophora on beaches; avian botulism; and beach closings. Causes of these problems include excessive nutrient loadings from both point and nonpoint sources, bacteria and other pathogens, development and shoreline hardening, agricultural practices, failing septic systems, improper grey-water discharge, increased frequency and intensity of storm events due to climate change, and invasive species. Nonpoint sources are now the primary contributors of nutrients and sediments to the Great Lakes and their tributaries. Implementation of best management practices addressing those sources can have multiple benefits, including decreasing surface runoff with simultaneous reductions in runoff of soils, nutrients, pesticides, and other nonpoint source pollutants.

EPA expects to provide approximately $3,000,000 for approximately 6 to 8 projects to reduce nonpoint source pollution to the Great Lakes.  The maximum amount of federal funds that will be awarded for any project in this category is $500,000.  Projects submitted in this category must be projects implementing agricultural best management practices or management measures from watershed-based plans that are consistent with the components outlined in EPA’s Nine Elements Guidance. Such plans are designed to address documented nonpoint source-related water quality problems and to help prevent future agricultural nonpoint source water quality-related problems. The plans are based upon sound science and evaluation techniques; have measurable outcomes; are developed with stakeholder/public involvement; and leverage additional resources. See the following links for approved Nine-Element Watershed Management Plans or information about the plans:
•  Michigan: http://www.michigan.gov/deq/0,1607,7-135-3313_3682_3714—,00.html (Follow the NPS  Approved and Pending Watershed Plans link.)

Maumee River Watershed Nutrient Prevention Pilot Project (EPA-R5-GL2015-MNP)

This pilot initiative seeks to increase the longevity and cost-effectiveness of nutrient discharge reduction measures in the Maumee River watershed by investing in permanent land conservation easements2 and other measures that support long-term nutrient reduction. EPA expects to provide approximately $1,000,000 for up to 2 projects in this category.

Funding/Awards: Approximately $13.9 million may be awarded in total as grants and/or cooperative agreements under this RFA for up to about 40 projects in the five categories listed above, contingent upon funding availability, the quality of applications received and other applicable considerations.  However, EPA expressly reserves the right to make no awards under a particular category or to adjust the number of awards originally anticipated under a specific category.

Proposed projects must be limited to the project duration identified for the respective categories.  Awards may be fully or incrementally funded.  All incrementally funded awards will be subject to the availability of funding, future appropriations, satisfactory performance of work, and other applicable considerations.  Applicants may submit applications under each funding opportunity number listed above and multiple applications per funding opportunity number, provided that each application is for a different project, is submitted separately, and each application cannot address more than one category.

  • Monday, September 28, 2015 –Applications must be submitted to EPA through http://www.grants.gov by 10:59 p.m. Central Daylight Time / 11:59 p.m., Eastern Daylight Time.  See Section IV for further submission information.
  • October 2015 (tentative) – EPA will begin notifying finalists.
  • December 2015 (tentative) – EPA will begin making official awards.
Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Funding, Deadline Sept. 28