Public Humanities Project Grants, Deadline Jan. 11, 2017

Public Humanities Projects grants support projects that bring the ideas and insights of the humanities to life for general audiences. Projects must engage humanities scholarship to analyze significant themes in disciplines such as history, literature, ethics, and art, or to address challenging issues in contemporary life. NEH encourages projects that involve members of the public in collaboration with humanities scholars or that invite contributions from the community in the development and delivery of humanities programming.

This grant program supports a variety of forms of audience engagement. Applications should follow the parameters set out below for one of the following three formats:

• Community Conversations: This format supports one- to three-year-long series of community-wide public discussions in which diverse residents creatively address community challenges, guided by the perspectives of the humanities.

• Exhibitions: This format supports permanent exhibitions that will be on view for at least three years, or travelling exhibitions that will be available to public audiences in at least two venues in the United States (including the originating location).

• Historic Places: This format supports the interpretation of historic sites, houses, neighborhoods, and regions, which might include living history presentations, guided tours, exhibitions, and public programs. NEH encourages projects that explore humanities ideas through multiple formats. Proposed projects may include complementary components that deepen an audience’s understanding of a subject: for example, a museum exhibition might be accompanied by a website, mobile app, or discussion programs.

Eligible Applicants:
State governments
County governments
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
City or township governments
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Private institutions of higher education
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Special district governments

Contact us for more information. To learn more about GFA visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

 

Public Humanities Project Grants, Deadline Jan. 11, 2017

Art Supply Grants – Deadline Nov. 1

2014-15 Art Equipment & Supply Grant

Michigan Youth Arts (MYA), through assistance from The Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, is offering Michigan K-12 schools grants of up to $2,500 to pay for arts equipment (including repairs of arts equipment) or supplies being used within the classroom/school setting. Grants are determined by independent panelists, based on how well applications adhere to the grant guidelines (rather than in comparison to other applicants). Michigan K-12 teachers of any “arts” subject may apply for the grant, including: visual arts, vocal music, instrumental music, and dance. Grants are awarded on a reimbursement basis, and a 1:1 match (in terms of teacher or volunteer time, or an equivalent cash amount) is required.

All applications will be evaluated and scored using the following 3 criteria:

  • Excellence: Applicant’s past history of integrating the arts into the school curriculum, and how the purchase of arts equipment/supplies will benefit the learning occurring in the classroom or school.
  • Impact: Estimated number of individuals benefiting, and/or participating; location of project/programming – this is an explanation of the demographics and community the school operates in; accessibility; and public presentation component (if any). Special consideration will be given to underrepresented areas, communities with low access to the arts, or demonstrated need.
  • Management: Classroom Teacher – how is the lead teacher qualified to use the purchased equipment or supplies; and Evaluation Plan – how will the equipment/supplies be purchased and integrated into the classroom curriculum.

Panelists will also consider applicant’s reporting history and compliance status on previous grant awards.

Start Date: 07/01/2014 12:00 AM
Close Date: 11/01/2014 11:59 PM

To apply visit http://www.michiganyoutharts.org/grants/guidelines

 

Art Supply Grants – Deadline Nov. 1

NEA Our Town Program, Deadline Jan. 13

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Through Our Town, subject to the availability of funding, the National Endowment for the Arts will provide a limited number of grants, ranging from $25,000 to $200,000, for creative placemaking projects that contribute toward the livability of communities and help transform them into lively, beautiful, and sustainable places with the arts at their core. Our Town will invest in creative and innovative projects in which communities, together with their arts and design organizations and artists, seek to:

  •     Improve their quality of life.
  •     Encourage greater creative activity.
  •     Foster stronger community identity and a sense of place.
  •     Revitalize economic development.

Partnerships

A key to the success of creative placemaking is involving the arts in partnership with committed governmental and private sector leadership. All Our Town applications must reflect a partnership that will provide leadership for the project. These partnerships must involve two primary partners: a nonprofit organization and a local government entity, as defined by these guidelines. One of the two primary partners must be a cultural (arts or design) organization. The highest ranking official of the local government is required to submit a formal endorsement letter designating the project as the only one being submitted for the local government. Additional partners are encouraged and may include an appropriate variety of entities such as state level government agencies, foundations, arts organizations and artists, nonprofit organizations, design professionals and design centers, educational institutions, real estate developers, business leaders, and community organizations, as well as public and governmental entities.

Our Town projects should represent the distinct character and quality of their communities and must reflect the following principles:

  •     A systemic approach to civic development and a persuasive vision for enhanced community livability.
  •     Clearly defined civic development goals and objectives that recognize and enhance the role that the arts and design play at the center of community life.
  •     An action plan aligned with the project vision and civic development goals.
  •     A funding plan that is appropriate, feasible, indicates strong and wide community support, and includes a well-conceived strategy for maintaining the work of the project.
  •     Artistic excellence of the design and/or arts organizations, designers, or artists involved with the project.

Projects may include arts engagement, cultural planning, and design activities such as:

  • Arts Engagement
  • Arts engagement projects support artistically excellent artistic production or practice as the focus of creative placemaking work.
  • Innovative programming that fosters interaction among community members, arts organizations, and artists, or activates existing cultural and community assets.
  • Festivals and performances in spaces not normally used for such purposes.
  • Public art that improves public spaces and strategically reflects or shapes the physical and social character of a community.

Cultural Planning

Cultural planning projects support the development of artistically excellent local support systems necessary for creative placemaking to succeed.

  •     Creative asset mapping.
  •     Cultural district planning.
  •     The development of master plans or community-wide strategies for public art.
  •     Support for creative entrepreneurship.
  •     Creative industry cluster/hub development.

Design

Design projects that demonstrate artistic excellence while supporting the development of environments where creative placemaking takes place, or where the identity of place is created or reinforced.

  •     Design of rehearsal, studio, or live/work spaces for artists.
  •     Design of cultural spaces – new or adaptive reuse.
  •     Design of public spaces, e.g., parks, plazas, landscapes, neighborhoods, districts, infrastructure, bridges, and artist-produced elements of streetscapes. Community engagement activities including design charrettes, design competitions, and community design workshops.

When eligible, previous Our Town grantees and their communities may apply to Our Town for a distinctly different project, or a distinctly different phase of the project, from that which was funded.

We understand that creative placemaking projects are often multi-year, large-scale initiatives. Please specify in your application which phase or phases of your project are included in your request for NEA funding. All phases of a project — except for those for facilities noted below — are eligible for support. The NEA reserves the right to limit its support of a project to a particular phase(s) or cost(s). All costs included in your Project Budget must be expended during your period of support.

If relevant to your project, you will be required to provide information in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and/or the National Historic Preservation Act.

Contact us for more information!

NEA Our Town Program, Deadline Jan. 13

NEH Challenge Grants, Deadline May 1

NEH challenge grants are capacity-building grants, intended to help institutions and organizations secure long-term improvements in and support for their humanities programs and resources. Through these awards, many organizations and institutions have been able to increase their humanities capacity and secure the permanent support of an endowment. Grants may be used to establish or enhance endowments or spend-down funds that generate expendable earnings to support and enhance ongoing program activities. Challenge grants may also provide capital directly supporting the procurement of long-lasting objects, such as acquisitions for archives and collections, the purchase of equipment, and the construction or renovation of facilities needed for humanities activities. Funds spent directly must be shown to bring long-term benefits to the institution and to the humanities more broadly. Grantee institutions may also expend up to 10 percent of total grant funds (federal funds plus matching funds) to defray costs of fundraising to meet the NEH challenge. Because of the matching requirement, these NEH grants also strengthen the humanities by encouraging nonfederal sources of support.

Contact us for more information!

NEH Challenge Grants, Deadline May 1

Museums for America Grant, Deadline Jan. 15

The goal of the Museums for America (MFA) program is to strengthen the ability of an individual museum to serve the public more effectively by supporting high-priority activities that advance its mission, plans, and strategic goals and objectives. MFA grants support activities that strengthen museums as active resources for lifelong learning, as important institutions in the establishment of livable communities, and as good stewards of the nation’s collections. MFA grants can fund both new and ongoing museum activities and programs. Examples include planning, managing and conserving collections, improving public access, training, conducting programmatic research, school and public programming, producing exhibitions, and integrating new or upgraded technologies into your operations.

There are three categories within the MFA program:

Learning Experiences IMLS places the learner at the center and supports engaging experiences in museums that prepare people to be full participants in their local communities and our global society. Projects should deliver high quality, inclusive, accessible and audience-focused programs, exhibitions, and services for lifelong learning in formal or informal settings.

Community Anchors IMLS promotes museums as strong community anchors that enhance civic engagement, cultural opportunities, and economic vitality. Projects should address common community challenges and demonstrate how your museum improves the quality of life and enriches community members’ knowledge and understanding of critical local and global issues, provides forums for community dialogue, and/or connects individuals to resources in the broader community service infrastructure through its programs and services. Projects may include capacity-building activities that position your museum to be more effective in fulfilling its role as a community anchor institution.

Collections Stewardship IMLS supports exemplary stewardship of museum collections and promotes the use of technology to facilitate discovery of knowledge and cultural heritage. Projects should support the care and management of collections to expand and sustain access for current and future generations. Projects should reflect systematic, holistic, logical approaches to the documentation, preservation, and conservation of tangible and digital collections to sustain and improve public access. Note to applicants: The FY 2013 Museums for America program now incorporates proposals previously solicited through the Conservation Project Support program.

To be eligible for an award under the FY2013 Museums for America program, you must be an organization that meets all three of the following criteria:

•You must be either a unit of State or local government or be a private nonprofit organization that has tax-exempt status under the Internal Revenue Code;

•You must be located in one of the 50 States of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, or the Republic of Palau; and

•You must qualify as one of the following: 1. A museum that, using a professional staff, is organized on a permanent basis for essentially educational or aesthetic purposes; owns or uses tangible objects, either animate or inanimate; cares for these objects; and exhibits these objects to the general public on a regular basis through facilities that is owns or operates.

What types of museums are eligible? Museums include, but are not limited to, aquariums, arboretums, art museums, botanical gardens, children’s/youth museums, general museums (those having two or more significant disciplines), historic houses/sites, history museums, natural history/anthropology museums, nature centers, planetariums, science/technology centers, specialized museums (limited to a single distinct subject), and zoological parks. What does it mean to be using a professional staff? An institution uses a professional staff if it employs at least one staff member, or the full-time equivalent, whether paid or unpaid, primarily engaged in the acquisition, care, or exhibition to the public of objects owned or used by the institution. What does it mean to exhibit the objects to the general public? An institution exhibits objects to the general public if such exhibition is a primary purpose of the institution. An institution that exhibits objects to the general public for at least 120 days a year is deemed to exhibit objects to the general public on a regular basis. An institution which does not have the exhibition of objects as a primary purpose and/or does not exhibit objects to the public for at least 120 days a year may be determined to be eligible as a museum under certain circumstances. For more information, please see 45 CFR §1180.2(d). 2. A public or private nonprofit agency which is responsible for the operation of a museum may apply on behalf of the museum.

Original Closing Date for Applications:     Jan 15, 2013
Current Closing Date for Applications:     Jan 15, 2013
Archive Date:     Feb 14, 2013
Funding Instrument Type:     Grant
Expected Number of Awards:     185
Award Ceiling:     $150,000
Award Floor:     $5,000
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement:     Yes

Contact us for more information!

Museums for America Grant, Deadline Jan. 15

NEA GAP: Art Works 2 – Deadline August 9

The Arts Endowment’s support of a project may start on or after June 1, 2013. The NEA’s guiding principle is embodied in one sentence: “Art works.” “Art works” is a noun; the creation of works of art by artists. “Art works” is a verb; art works on and within people to change and inspire them. “Art works” is a statement; arts jobs are real jobs that are part of the real economy.

Art Works encourages and supports the following four outcomes:

  1. Creation: The creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence,
  2. Engagement: Public engagement with diverse and excellent art,
  3. Learning: Lifelong learning in the arts, and
  4. Livability: The strengthening of communities through the arts.

You will be asked to select the outcome that is most relevant to your project, and you also will be able to select a secondary outcome (note that all Arts Education applicants must choose the Learning outcome as their primary outcome). When making selections, you should identify the outcome(s) that reflect the results expected to be achieved by your project. If you receive a grant, you also will be asked to provide evidence of those results.

Awards: Minimum $10,000, maximum $100,000

Eligible Applicants:

State governments
County governments
City or township governments
Special district governments
Independent school districts
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Private institutions of higher education

Additional Information on Eligibility:

Nonprofit, tax-exempt 501(c)(3), U.S. organizations; units of state or local government; or federally recognized tribal communities or tribes may apply. Applicants may be arts organizations, local arts agencies, arts service organizations, local education agencies (school districts), and other organizations that can help advance the goals of the Arts Endowment. To be eligible, the applicant organization must: • Meet the Arts Endowment’s “Legal Requirements” including nonprofit, tax-exempt status at the time of application. (All organizations must apply directly on their own behalf. Applications through a fiscal agent are not allowed.) • Have a three-year history of programming prior to the application deadline. • Have submitted acceptable Final Report packages by the due date(s) for all Arts Endowment grant(s) previously received.

Contact us for more information!

NEA GAP: Art Works 2 – Deadline August 9

Artist Community Grants, Deadline March 8

ARTIST COMMUNITIES: Art Works

Introduction

The NEA’s guiding principle is embodied in one sentence: “Art works.”

“Art works” is a noun; the creation of works of art by artists. “Art works” is a verb; art works on and within people to change and inspire them. “Art works” is a statement; arts jobs are real jobs that are part of the real economy.

Art Works encourages and supports the following four outcomes:

  • Creation: The creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence,
  • Engagement: Public engagement with diverse and excellent art,
  • Learning: Lifelong learning in the arts, and
  • Livability: The strengthening of communities through the arts.

You will be asked to select the outcome that is most relevant to your project, and you also will be able to select a secondary outcome (note that all Arts Education applicants must choose the Learning outcome as their primary outcome). When making selections, you should identify the outcome(s) that reflect the results expected to be achieved by your project. If you receive a grant, you also will be asked to provide evidence of those results.

  1. Creation: The portfolio of American art is expanded.Support is available for projects to create art that meets the highest standards of excellence across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. Through the creation of art, these projects are intended to replenish and rejuvenate America’s enduring cultural legacy. Creation activities may include:
    • Commissioning, development, and production of new work.
    • Design competitions and design or planning projects for new arts or cultural spaces or landscapes.
    • Workshops and residencies for artists where the primary purpose is to create new art.
    • Opportunities for writers and translators to create or refine their work.
    • Projects that employ innovative forms of art-making and design.

    You will be asked to address the anticipated results in your application. If you receive a grant, you will be asked to provide evidence of those results at the end of your project. You will need to provide evidence of the new art works created. If the project activities do not lead to the creation of completed works of art within the period of a grant, you may demonstrate progress toward the creation of art by describing the artists’ participation and work accomplished by the end of the grant. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Creation.

  2. Engagement: Americans throughout the nation experience art.Support is available for projects that provide public engagement with artistic excellence across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. These projects should engage the public directly with the arts, providing Americans with new opportunities to have profound and meaningful arts experiences. Engagement activities may include:
    • Exhibitions, performances, concerts, and readings.
    • Film screenings.
    • Touring and outreach activities.
    • Restaging of repertory and master works of historical significance.
    • Art fairs and festivals.
    • Documentation, preservation, and conservation of art work.
    • Public programs that raise awareness of cultural heritage.
    • Broadcasts on television or radio; video games; mobile apps; live streaming, audio- and video-on-demand, podcasts, MP3 files, or other digital applications.
    • Design charrettes.
    • Publication, production, and promotion of digital, audio, mobile, or online publications; books; magazines; catalogues; and searchable information databases.
    • Services to artists and arts organizations.
    • Projects that extend the arts to underserved populations — those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability.
    • Projects that employ innovative forms of art and design delivery.

    You will be asked to address the anticipated results in your application. If you receive a grant, you will be asked to provide evidence of those results at the end of your project. You will need to describe the participants’ experiences as well as the composition of the participant group. If the nature of the project does not allow for the documentation of participants’ experiences explicitly, you may document the composition of the participant group and numbers of participants and activities, and describe the activities used to engage the public with art. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Engagement.

  3. Learning: Americans of all ages acquire knowledge or skills in the arts.Support is available for projects that provide Americans of all ages with arts learning opportunities across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. These projects should focus on the acquisition of knowledge or skills in the arts, thereby building public capacity for lifelong participation in the arts. Learning activities may include:
    • Lifelong learning activities for children, adults, and intergenerational groups.
    • Standards-based arts education activities for pre-K-12 students.
    • Informal education programs, workshops, and demonstrations.
    • Mentorships and apprenticeship programs.
    • Professional development for artists, teaching artists, teachers, and other education providers.
    • Assessments and evaluations of arts learning.
    • Online courses or training.
    • Lectures and symposia.
    • Production, publication, and distribution of teachers’/facilitators’ guides.
    • Innovative practices in arts learning for Americans of all ages.

    You will be asked to address the anticipated results in your application. If you receive a grant, you will be asked to provide evidence of those results at the end of your project. You will need to describe the participants’ learning, the composition of the participant group, and the numbers of participants and activities, as well as the activities used to facilitate the acquisition of knowledge or skills in the arts. If you receive support through the Arts Education discipline for a standards-based project, you will be required to report on additional measurable results, including identifying specific learning outcomes, describing the assessment method, and reporting on the number of participants who demonstrated learning. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Learning. In addition to a Final Descriptive Report and Federal Financial Report, Arts Education grantees will be required to submit assessment tools with their Final Report.

  4. Livability: American communities are strengthened through the arts. Support is available for projects that incorporate the arts and design into strategies to improve the livability of communities. Livability consists of a variety of factors that contribute to the quality of life in a community such as ample opportunities for social, civic, and cultural participation; education, employment, and safety; sustainability; affordable housing, ease of transportation, and access to public buildings and facilities; and an aesthetically pleasing environment. The arts can enhance livability by providing new avenues for expression and creativity. Arts- and design-related Livability activities may include:
    • The development of plans for cultural and/or creative sector growth.
    • The enhancement of public spaces through design or new art works.
    • Arts or design activities that are intended to foster community interaction in public spaces.
    • Cultural sustainability activities that contribute to community identity and sense of place.
    • The inclusion of artists, designers, and/or arts organizations in civic engagement activities and plans and processes to improve community livability and enhance the unique characteristics of a community.
    • Innovative community-based partnerships that integrate the arts with livability efforts.

    Please note that certain types of Livability activities will require applicants to provide information in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and/or the National Historic Preservation Act. See here for more information.

    The anticipated long-term results for Livability projects are measurable community benefits, such as growth in overall levels of social and civic engagement; arts- or design-focused changes in policies, laws, and/or regulations; job and/or revenue growth for the community; and changes in in-and-out migration patterns. You will be asked to address the anticipated results in your application. If you receive a grant, you will be asked to provide evidence of those results at the end of your project. Given the nature of Livability projects, benefits are likely to emerge over time and may not be fully measureable during the period of a grant. You will need to provide evidence of progress toward achieving improved livability as appropriate to the project. Reporting requirements for Livability are different from — and more extensive than — the reporting requirements for the other outcomes. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Livability.

Innovation

The NEA recognizes that arts and design organizations are often in the forefront of innovation in their work and strongly encourages innovation within the outcomes listed above. Innovative projects are characterized as those that:

  • Are likely to prove transformative with the potential for meaningful change, whether in the development or enhancement of new or existing art forms, new approaches to the creation or presentation of art, or new ways of engaging the public with art;
  • Are distinctive, offering fresh insights and new value for their fields and/or the public through unconventional solutions; and
  • Have the potential to be shared and/or emulated, or are likely to lead to other innovations.

*                      *                        *                      *                      *

Partnerships can be valuable to the success of these projects. While not required, applicants are encouraged to consider partnerships among organizations, both in and outside of the arts, as appropriate to their project.

The Arts Endowment also is interested in projects that extend the arts to underserved populations — those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability. This is achieved in part through the use of Challenge America funds.

Please note: The Art Works category does not fund direct grants to individuals. Direct grants to individuals are offered only in the category of Literature Fellowships.

Project Reporting and Evaluation

We ask all applicants to define what they would like to achieve, how they will assess the degree to which it is achieved, and, upon completion of the project, what they have learned from their experiences. Such feedback need not entail large-scale or expensive evaluation efforts. You should do what is feasible and appropriate for your organization and project. When a grant is completed, you must submit a final report and answer questions on your achievements and how these were determined. Arts Education grantees must submit assessment tools with their Final Report. (Please note that assessment tools may be shared publicly. If your tools are proprietary and have copyrights or trademarks attached, you will be asked to note that in your Final Report.) Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for the outcome that will be selected for the proposed project: Creation, Engagement, Learning, or Livability.

Beyond the reporting requirements for all grantees, selected Art Works grantees will be asked to assist in the collection of additional information that can help the NEA determine the degree to which agency objectives were achieved. You may be contacted to provide evidence of project accomplishments including, but not limited to, work samples, community action plans, cultural asset studies, programs, reviews, relevant news clippings, and playbills. Please remember that you are required to maintain project documentation for three years following submission of your final reports.

For a random sample of grants involving the presentation of art, selected grantees will be required to conduct surveys of audience members to gauge the nature and extent of audience response to these art experiences. Grantees selected to conduct surveys will receive materials, technical assistance, and up to $1,000 in nonmatching supplemental funding from the NEA. If you are selected, you will be notified of your participation at the time of grant award.

Deadline

The application deadline for all artist community projects is March 8, 2012. (There is no August deadline.) The earliest beginning date for the Arts Endowment’s period of support is January 1, 2013.

The Art Works category provides support for projects that address the following outcomes (in bold below). You will be asked to indicate the outcome that is most relevant to your project in your application and on the application form (you also will be able to select a secondary outcome).

Creation

  • Stipends and living accommodations for professional artists where the primary purpose is to create new art.
  • The expansion of the pool of artists that encourages the participation of artists from a wide variety of aesthetic viewpoints, ethnic backgrounds, or geographic areas where the primary purpose is to create new art.
  • Access to facilities or technology to meet the needs of interdisciplinary or new genre artists where the primary purpose is to create new art.
  • Innovative approaches to serving as an incubator for the creation of art.
  • Innovative collaborations between artists and those from sectors outside of the arts (e.g., science) to create new art.

Engagement

  • Innovative uses of technology, media, or new models and activities with the surrounding community that provide the public with direct experiences with practicing artists and increase the visibility of the work of artists and the organization.
  • Innovative approaches to collaboration with outside organizations and disciplines where the primary purpose is public engagement with art.

Learning

  • Activities with the surrounding community that provide educational and related activities for children, adults, intergenerational groups, and schools. (If your project is for children and youth, see “Choosing the Right Discipline for Children and Youth Projects” to help you in your discipline selection.)
  • Residency exchange programs with artists and artist communities in other countries where the primary purpose is the acquisition of knowledge or skills in the arts.

Livability

  • The development of artist live/work spaces.
  • The enhancement of public spaces through commissioning and/or installation of works created by members of artist communities.
  • The engagement of artist communities in plans and processes to improve community livability.
  • Community-based partnerships that integrate artist communities with livability efforts.

(Applicants are strongly encouraged to contact staff if they are considering Livability as a primary outcome.)

Application Review

This category uses the agency’s traditional method of application review. Applications are submitted to the Artist Communities staff and are reviewed by a diverse group of experts in the artist community field.

Applications are reviewed on the basis of artistic excellence and artistic merit. For more detailed information on how artistic excellence and artistic merit will be evaluated, see the “Review Criteria.” You can find additional information in the “Application Review” section of the “Frequently Asked Questions.” See the “Application Calendar” for information on when we expect to announce grant awards and rejections.

Artist Community Grants, Deadline March 8

Museums for America Grants, Due Nov. 1

Program Overview
Museums for America is the Institute’s largest grant program for museums, supporting projects and ongoing activities that build museums’ capacity to serve their communities.

Museums for America grants strengthen a museum’s ability to serve the public more effectively by supporting high-priority activities that advance the institution’s mission and strategic goals. Museums for America grants are designed to be flexible: funds can be used for a wide variety of projects, including ongoing museum activities, research and other behindthe-scenes activities, planning, new programs, purchase of equipment or services, and activities that will support the efforts of museums to upgrade and integrate new technologies. IMLS also welcomes proposals that promote the skills necessary to develop 21st century communities, citizens, and workers, and that encourage broad community access and participation.

Grants are awarded in the following categories:

  • Engaging Communities (Education, Exhibitions, Interpretation, and Inclusive Participation): Support projects that represent a broad range of educational activities through which museums share collections, content, and knowledge to support learning.
  • Building Institutional Capacity (Management, Policy, and Training): Support projects that serve to improve the infrastructure of museums to better serve their communities.
  • Collections Stewardship: Support projects that museums undertake to maintain and improve the management of museum collections in order to fulfill a museum’s public service mission.

Eligibilty
Museums that fulfill the eligibility criteria for museums may apply.

All types of museums, large and small, are eligible for funding. Eligible museums include aquariums, arboretums and botanical gardens, art museums, youth museums, general museums, historic houses and sites, history museums, nature centers, natural history and anthropology museums, planetariums, science and technology centers, specialized museums, and zoological parks. Federally operated and for-profit museums may not apply for IMLS funds.

An eligible applicant must be: either a unit of state or local government or a private not-for-profit organization that has tax-exempt status under the Internal Revenue Code; located in one of the fifty states of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated states of Micronesia, or the Republic of Palau; and a museum that, using a professional staff, (1) is organized on a permanent basis for essentially educational or aesthetic purposes; (2) owns or uses tangible objects, either animate or inanimate; (3) cares for these objects; and (4) exhibits these objects to the general public on a regular basis through facilities which it owns or operates. An organization uses a professional staff if it employs at least one professional staff member, or the fulltime equivalent, whether paid or unpaid primarily engaged in the acquisition, care, or exhibition to the public of objects owned or used by the institution. An organization “exhibits objects to the general public” if such exhibition is a primary purpose of the institution. Further, an organization which exhibits objects to the general public for at least 120 days a year shall be deemed to exhibit objects to the general public on a regular basis. An organization which exhibits objects by appointment may meet the requirement to exhibit objects to the general public on a regular basis, if it can establish, in light of the facts under all the relevant circumstances, that this method of exhibition does not unreasonably restrict the accessibility of the institution’s exhibits to the general public.

Please note that an organization which does not have as a primary purpose the exhibition of objects to the general public. but which can demonstrate that it exhibits objects to the general public on a regular basis as a significant, separate, distinct, and continuing portion of its activities, and that it otherwise meets the museum eligibility requirements, may be determined to be eligible as a museum under these guidelines. A museum located within a parent organization that is a state or local government or multipurpose non-profit entity, such as a municipality, university, historical society, foundation, or a cultural center, may apply on its own behalf, if the museum: (1) is able to independently fulfill all the eligibility requirements listed above; (2) functions as a discrete unit within the parent organization; (3) has its own fully segregated and itemized operating budget; and (4) has the authority to make the application on its own. When any of the last three conditions cannot be met, a museum may apply through its parent organization. Prospective applicants that cannot fulfill all of these requirements should contact IMLS to discuss their eligibility before applying. IMLS may require additional supporting documentation from the applicant to determine the museum’s autonomy. Each eligible applicant within a single parent organization should clearly delineate its own programs and operations in the application narrative. A parent organization that controls multiple museums that are not autonomous but which are otherwise eligible may submit only one application per grant program; the application may be submitted by the parent organization on behalf of one or more of the eligible museums.

http://www.imls.gov/applicants/grants/forAmerica.shtm

Museums for America Grants, Due Nov. 1

Grants for Humanities Programming, Deadline Aug. 18


America’s Historical and Cultural Organizations grants support projects in the humanities that explore stories, ideas, and beliefs in order to deepen our understanding of our lives and our world. The Division of Public Programs supports the development of humanities content and interactivity that excite, inform, and stir thoughtful reflection upon culture, identity, and history in creative and new ways. Grants for America’s Historical and Cultural Organizations should encourage dialogue, discussion, and civic engagement, and they should foster learning among people of all ages. To that end, the Division of Public Programs urges applicants to consider more than one format for presenting humanities ideas to the public.

NEH offers two categories of grants for America’s Historical and Cultural Organizations: planning and implementation Grants. Planning grants are available for projects that may need further development before applying for implementation. This planning can include the identification and refinement of the project’s main humanities ideas and questions, consultation with scholars, preliminary audience evaluation, preliminary design of the proposed interpretive formats, beta testing of digital formats, development of complementary programming, research, or the drafting of interpretive materials.

Implementation grants support the final preparation of a project for presentation to the public. Applicants must submit a full walkthrough for an exhibition, or a prototype or storyboard for a digital project, which demonstrates a solid command of the humanities ideas and scholarship that relate to the subject. Applicants for implementation grants should have already finished most of the planning for their projects, including the identification of the key humanities themes, relevant scholarship, and program formats. For exhibitions, implementation grants can support the final stages of design development, but these grants are primarily intended for installation.

Current Closing Date for Applications: Aug 18, 2010

Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

Eligible Applicants:
State governments
County governments
City or township governments
Special district governments
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Private institutions of higher education

National Endowment for the Humanities

Contact us for more information!

Grants for Humanities Programming, Deadline Aug. 18

Michigan Humanities Council, Underwriting Grants

Arts & Humanities Touring Program Grants (up to 40% of expenses or $3,000)

Michigan’s Arts & Humanities Touring Directory represents 204 of our state’s most talented performing and visual artists and humanities presenters. It provides schools, libraries, museums, civic and service groups, festival organizers, and other Michigan nonprofits a wide variety of cultural programming in the fields of dance, music, storytelling, theater, and traditional and visual arts. The Touring Program grants are available to nonprofit organizations who may request up to 40 percent of presenters’/exhibitors’ fees and travel expenses. Request for a grant may not exceed $3,000 per application, and an organization may not submit more than four grant applications or request more than $4,000 in a fiscal year. Applications are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis.

As of January 28, 2010, applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis for programs April 1, 2010 through September 30, 2010. Funding is pending approval by the Michigan Council for the Arts and Cultural Affairs.

Deadline: Grants are first come-first served until funding is exhausted.

Questions? Contact Phyllis Rathbun at 517-372-7770.

Michigan Humanities Council, Underwriting Grants