Art Supply Grants – Deadline Nov. 1

2014-15 Art Equipment & Supply Grant

Michigan Youth Arts (MYA), through assistance from The Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, is offering Michigan K-12 schools grants of up to $2,500 to pay for arts equipment (including repairs of arts equipment) or supplies being used within the classroom/school setting. Grants are determined by independent panelists, based on how well applications adhere to the grant guidelines (rather than in comparison to other applicants). Michigan K-12 teachers of any “arts” subject may apply for the grant, including: visual arts, vocal music, instrumental music, and dance. Grants are awarded on a reimbursement basis, and a 1:1 match (in terms of teacher or volunteer time, or an equivalent cash amount) is required.

All applications will be evaluated and scored using the following 3 criteria:

  • Excellence: Applicant’s past history of integrating the arts into the school curriculum, and how the purchase of arts equipment/supplies will benefit the learning occurring in the classroom or school.
  • Impact: Estimated number of individuals benefiting, and/or participating; location of project/programming – this is an explanation of the demographics and community the school operates in; accessibility; and public presentation component (if any). Special consideration will be given to underrepresented areas, communities with low access to the arts, or demonstrated need.
  • Management: Classroom Teacher – how is the lead teacher qualified to use the purchased equipment or supplies; and Evaluation Plan – how will the equipment/supplies be purchased and integrated into the classroom curriculum.

Panelists will also consider applicant’s reporting history and compliance status on previous grant awards.

Start Date: 07/01/2014 12:00 AM
Close Date: 11/01/2014 11:59 PM

To apply visit http://www.michiganyoutharts.org/grants/guidelines

 

Art Supply Grants – Deadline Nov. 1

County Fair Grants, Deadline Nov. 15

The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) announced a competitive grant opportunity for Michigan’s county fairs to make building and other capital improvements to their fairground facilities.  Grant proposals must be received by MDARD no later than Friday, November 15, 2013.

The grants will range from $1,000 to $20,000 and will require a dollar-for-dollar cash match from the county fair.  This grant program provides additional access to funds for county fair officials to help make needed improvements to their fairground facilities; including but not limited to structural improvements or other renovations to buildings.

The submitted grants will go through a competitive grant process and be reviewed by an evaluation committee.

Eligible applicants include fairs that are incorporated under Act 80 of 1855 or county owned and operated fairs operating under Act 11 of 1929 and county fairs that have submitted all required year-end reports for the prior two years.

County Fair Grants, Deadline Nov. 15

Playground Grants, Various Deadlines

Lake Ann Waterfront Park, by GFA
Lake Ann Waterfront Park, by GFA

2013 Let’s Play Community Construction Grant Program

This grant is open to applicants without a playground, or with existing equipment that is unsafe for children to use. If you already have equipment on site that you intend to keep, whether or not it is age appropriate, your application will be less competitive.

Eligibility:
• U.S.-based municipalities
• Registered 501c3 organizations
• Public & Charter Schools
• Non-profit, child-serving organizations

Other Eligibility Requirements
• Applicant must own the land, possess a long-term lease on the land, or have permission to build from land owner
• Playground equipment purchase must fall between $24,000 and $40,000, not including freight, surfacing or side projects.
• Applicant cannot be a past KaBOOM! grant recipient
• Applicant must use the KaBOOM! community-build model throughout the planning and construction process
• Applicant must complete the playground project within 12 months of receiving the grant award
• Applicant must work with a KaBOOM! Preferred Equipment Vendor

Award Max:    $15,000.00

__________________________________________________________________________________

2013 DPS Let’s Play Maintenance Grant Program

Eligibility:
1. Submit a completed application by a priority deadline.
2. Demonstrate that your community has led an improvement project in the last six months.
3. Rate or add your play space to the Map of Play.
4. Specific play space has not received a Maintenance Grant or an Engineered Wood Fiber Surfacing Grant in the past.
5. Sign off on the following liability language:

-Grantee agrees to use the $750 check for expenses related to the improvement and maintenance of the playspace.
-Grantee undertakes the project supported by the Grant funds on its own behalf and not on behalf of KaBOOM! or DPS, and the Grant shall in no way be construed as creating the relationship of principal and agent, of partnership or of joint venture as between KaBOOM! or DPS and the Grantee or any other person involved in the project. By accepting the Grant, the Grantee acknowledges that neither KaBOOM! nor DPS nor their respective subsidiaries and affiliates, and their officers, directors, employees or agents shall be liable for any acts, omissions, errors, injuries or damages, whether direct, indirect, incidental or consequential, associated with the use of the Grant funds or the Grant sponsored project.
-Grantee understands that they might be contacted by a representative from the Dr Pepper Snapple Group and, if requested, grantee agrees to collaborate with a representative from the Dr Pepper Snapple Group to plan and host a grant award presentation.
-Grantee acknowledges that all grantees will automatically be signed up to receive information by email from Let’s Play.

Deadline:    08-31-2013
Award Max:    $750.00
____________________________________________________

The American Academy of Dermatology’s Shade Structure Grant Program awards grants to public schools and non-profit organizations for installing permanent shade structures for outdoor locations that are not protected from the sun, such as playgrounds, pools or recreation spaces. Each Shade Structure Grant is valued up to $8,000, which includes the cost for a shade structure and installation. In addition to the grant, the Academy also provides a permanent sign near the shade structure. The AAD receives support for this program from its members and outside organizations.

Eligible applicants
The Academy Shade Structure Grant Program is open to 501(c)(3) non-profit organizations that provide services, programs and curricula to children and teenagers who are 18 and younger. To be considered for grants, applicants must:
•    Be recommended by an Academy member dermatologist. Locate an Academy member dermatologist by using the Find a Dermatologist tool.
•    Demonstrate an ongoing commitment to sun safety and skin cancer awareness by having a sun-safety/skin cancer awareness program in place for at least one year prior to application.
This awareness program can be re-purposed with materials available from other organizations (such as the American Cancer Society, EPA SunWise Program, CDC Sun Safety for America’s Youth Toolkit, or Cancer Control PLANET) or can be original content developed specifically for your audience.
•    Consider a shade structure that meets the stringent requirements of the Academy. See Apply for a Shade Structure Grant Program Toolkit below for specific criteria on shade structure selection.

Contact us for more information!

Playground Grants, Various Deadlines

Dow Community Grants, Deadline March 31

Community Grants

Grant Timeline

  • 2nd Cycle
    • Application Deadline – march 31, 2013
    • Notification Date – May 1, 2013

by Heather Brady

The Community Grants category includes yearly grants for Community projects.

The companyGIVES Community Grant Program provides funding for projects that contribute to the success of local communities with the objective of making them better places to live and work. Grants are given to one-time projects that have the potential to provide visible, long-term, sustainable benefits for community members.

Applicants must be charitable or non-profit organizations with a 501(c)(3) designation. Faith-based non-profit organizations may qualify, provided their proposed project is for the benefit of the community as a whole rather than just the members of their congregation or organization.

Projects must be initiated by the non-profit organization and contribute to Dow’s global community success and local quality of life impact in at least one of the following areas:

Science – Enhancing understanding of the roles of chemicals and plastics in the chemical industry or having the potential to increase interest in careers and opportunities linked to chemistry, engineering, technology and other sciences
Community Success – Promotes job creation, meets community defined needs, provides permanent improvement to the social infrastructure of a disadvantaged or underprivileged section of the community or provides funding for materials or tools which will be widely available within a community or will offer long-term benefit to the community
Sustainability and Innovation – Enhances or protects the natural environment or raises awareness among a broad public audience of environmental issues and relationship to social and economic consideration

Projects should also align to local Community Success goals. To meet Dow’s goals for Community Success, requests for funding should also show how a proposed project will impact community residents and include details about how the community will learn of Dow’s involvement.

A selection committee will review grant applications and choose grant recipients.

  • Applicants should request only the amount needed to fund the project
  • Funding cannot be used for operating expenses, personal computers, travel expenses, dues, advertising, fund raising events, giveaways or prizes, individual scholarships, dues and memberships or lobbying expenses
  • If additional funding is required to complete the project, the funding sources must be secured and confirmed prior to applying for a Dow Community Grant
  • Application should not exceed 4 pages in length, including the project description and itemized budget.
  • Applications must be signed by the organization’s Executive Director or equivalent

What kinds of projects do not apply?

  • Those submitted by for-profit businesses, religious organizations for the sole benefit of the organization, individual sports teams, political organizations or candidates, labor unions, homeowners’ associations or individuals

Contact us for more information!

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Dow Community Grants, Deadline March 31

Teaching Grants, Deadline June 30

The Meemic Foundation for the Future of Education offers a variety of grant opportunities designed to assist educators. These funding opportunities include traditional grants in amounts up to $2,500 and specialty grants of varying amounts for items such as books. This page will provide the most up-to-date information on the types of grants available and the important dates associated with the application process.

Meemic Foundation Grants:

These grants are designed to fund innovative programs, events or projects that will significantly enhance a students’ classroom experience. Educators can request up to $2,500 for any type* of program. Below is a breakdown of the available funding rounds for this year.

Fall 2012 Funding Round

Application period:
Now – June 30, 2012
Spring/Winter 2013 Funding Round

Application period:
July 1 – October 31, 2012

Apply Now!

Applying is fast and easy. Just visit our quick online grant application to get started.

Selection Process

Each grant proposal will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

  • The number of students involved
  • The project’s potential to make a lasting impact on students
  • How the program relates to classroom instruction
  • The ability to replicate the project for future use
  • Cost effectiveness

*Applications simply requesting school supplies and equipment (such as computers, graphic calculators and art materials) will not be considered. Meemic Book Grants:

Based on the heightened demand for the basic tools to educate our students – books – Meemic Insurance Company donates an additional $25,000 each year to the Meemic Foundation for this expressed need. These specialty book grants are designed to assist educators with the task of offering new classroom reading materials that will challenge and excite their students. Educators can request up to a $500 grant for any book-related purpose.

2012 Book Grant

Application period:
August 1 – September 30, 2012

Apply Now!

The book grant application period has not begun yet. Please check back during the application period.

Selection Process

Each book grant proposal will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

  • The potential to influence a school or district improvement goal
  • The number of students impacted
  • How it relates to classroom instruction
  • Cost effectiveness

Any employee of a public, private, charter or parochial school, college or university in a qualifying state may apply for a Meemic grant. Educators from the same school may submit proposals for different programs. Total grant funding may not exceed the total cost of the project. The Meemic Foundation may grant any portion of the program up to the total cost. Educators will be notified by telephone or mail if their grant is to be funded. All others will receive a letter notifying the applicant of the Foundation’s decision. Grants with significant conceptual, legibility or clarity problems will not be considered. Grantees are required to submit a follow-up report after the completion of the project. All unused funds must be returned.

Teaching Grants, Deadline June 30

Stop by and say hi at the Small Business Showcase this Wednesday!

We’re very happy to say that we’re a TC Chamber 2012 Small Business of the Year nominee. We hope you’ll take a minute this Wednesday afternoon (5:30-7:30 pm) to stop by the Hagerty Center and say hi. Admission is free and you can get a look at the other great nominees as well.

http://tcchamber.org/leadership-development/transform-your-organization/small-business-celebration/

We hope to see you there!

In the meantime, today’s featured grant is the Farm to School program.

The MI Farm to School Grant Program awards Michigan K-12 schools/districts with funds ($2,000 maximum each) to plan for or implement farm to school programs. With funding from the WK Kellogg Foundation, this program is coordinated by the MSU Center for Regional Food Systems, formerly the C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Food Systems. The application period for the second grant year (September 1, 2012 – June 1, 2013) is now open! Applications are due by 5 pm EST on Friday, May 4, 2012.

  • The MI Farm to School Planning Grant helps K-12 schools and Pre-K programs plan for integrating fresh, local foods into cafeterias AND ultimately develop a Farm to School Action Plan to implement a farm to school program.

    Examples of ways funding may be used include but are not limited to the following:

    • Meeting expenses for gathering farmers, food service professionals, students, parents, community members, etc.
    • Trainings/learning opportunities (i.e. fresh food prep, knife skills, seasonal menu planning, etc.) in addition to those required for grantees
    • Fees associated with attending conferences related to farm to school, local agriculture, food systems, etc.
    • Costs associated with co-learning opportunities, student engagement, school wellness committee engagement, etc.
    • Purchase of kitchen or cafeteria equipment (up to $500) to help prepare and serve fresh, local produce
  • The MI Farm to School Implementation Grant helps schools put existing farm to school plans into action AND ultimately develop a Farm to School Sustainability Plan to keep a farm to school program going and growing in future years.

    Examples of ways funding may be used include but are not limited to the following:

    • Purchase of kitchen or cafeteria equipment, resources or materials that will help to increase the use of local foods in the school food service program
    • Purchase of fresh, local food products to use in the school food service program
    • Costs associated with co-learning opportunities, student engagement, school wellness committee engagement, etc.
    • Marketing materials for fresh, local foods in school cafeterias (i.e. posters, line tags, etc.)
    • On-going training or learning opportunities for food service staff to utilize fresh, local foods

Eligibility:

  • The school food service program must have at least 50% free and reduced-price meal enrollment at the time this application is completed. A goal of this program is to help vulnerable children find more local, healthy food choices in school meals programs.
  • Only school food service/nutrition directors can apply for their school district(s) or school(s). Food service directors from a school district may choose to focus on a few school buildings or an entire school district’s food service program, but the district must have 50% free and reduced price meal enrollment. Private or charter schools may apply as an individual school.
  • Only one application for either the planning or implementation grant (not both) is allowed per pre-K program, school or district per grant year.
  • Pre-K and early childcare programs are eligible only for planning grants. The program must be eligible to receive Tier 1 reimbursement rates for at least 50% of program participants (as indicated by current Child and Adult Care Food Program eligibility) to apply. Private or charter school and early childcare programs servicing children from birth-5 may apply as individual grantees. Childcare programs solely contracting with a school/district for all meals programs must apply in partnership with the school/district food service/nutrition director.

Contact us for more details!

Stop by and say hi at the Small Business Showcase this Wednesday!

Artist Community Grants, Deadline March 8

ARTIST COMMUNITIES: Art Works

Introduction

The NEA’s guiding principle is embodied in one sentence: “Art works.”

“Art works” is a noun; the creation of works of art by artists. “Art works” is a verb; art works on and within people to change and inspire them. “Art works” is a statement; arts jobs are real jobs that are part of the real economy.

Art Works encourages and supports the following four outcomes:

  • Creation: The creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence,
  • Engagement: Public engagement with diverse and excellent art,
  • Learning: Lifelong learning in the arts, and
  • Livability: The strengthening of communities through the arts.

You will be asked to select the outcome that is most relevant to your project, and you also will be able to select a secondary outcome (note that all Arts Education applicants must choose the Learning outcome as their primary outcome). When making selections, you should identify the outcome(s) that reflect the results expected to be achieved by your project. If you receive a grant, you also will be asked to provide evidence of those results.

  1. Creation: The portfolio of American art is expanded.Support is available for projects to create art that meets the highest standards of excellence across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. Through the creation of art, these projects are intended to replenish and rejuvenate America’s enduring cultural legacy. Creation activities may include:
    • Commissioning, development, and production of new work.
    • Design competitions and design or planning projects for new arts or cultural spaces or landscapes.
    • Workshops and residencies for artists where the primary purpose is to create new art.
    • Opportunities for writers and translators to create or refine their work.
    • Projects that employ innovative forms of art-making and design.

    You will be asked to address the anticipated results in your application. If you receive a grant, you will be asked to provide evidence of those results at the end of your project. You will need to provide evidence of the new art works created. If the project activities do not lead to the creation of completed works of art within the period of a grant, you may demonstrate progress toward the creation of art by describing the artists’ participation and work accomplished by the end of the grant. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Creation.

  2. Engagement: Americans throughout the nation experience art.Support is available for projects that provide public engagement with artistic excellence across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. These projects should engage the public directly with the arts, providing Americans with new opportunities to have profound and meaningful arts experiences. Engagement activities may include:
    • Exhibitions, performances, concerts, and readings.
    • Film screenings.
    • Touring and outreach activities.
    • Restaging of repertory and master works of historical significance.
    • Art fairs and festivals.
    • Documentation, preservation, and conservation of art work.
    • Public programs that raise awareness of cultural heritage.
    • Broadcasts on television or radio; video games; mobile apps; live streaming, audio- and video-on-demand, podcasts, MP3 files, or other digital applications.
    • Design charrettes.
    • Publication, production, and promotion of digital, audio, mobile, or online publications; books; magazines; catalogues; and searchable information databases.
    • Services to artists and arts organizations.
    • Projects that extend the arts to underserved populations — those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability.
    • Projects that employ innovative forms of art and design delivery.

    You will be asked to address the anticipated results in your application. If you receive a grant, you will be asked to provide evidence of those results at the end of your project. You will need to describe the participants’ experiences as well as the composition of the participant group. If the nature of the project does not allow for the documentation of participants’ experiences explicitly, you may document the composition of the participant group and numbers of participants and activities, and describe the activities used to engage the public with art. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Engagement.

  3. Learning: Americans of all ages acquire knowledge or skills in the arts.Support is available for projects that provide Americans of all ages with arts learning opportunities across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. These projects should focus on the acquisition of knowledge or skills in the arts, thereby building public capacity for lifelong participation in the arts. Learning activities may include:
    • Lifelong learning activities for children, adults, and intergenerational groups.
    • Standards-based arts education activities for pre-K-12 students.
    • Informal education programs, workshops, and demonstrations.
    • Mentorships and apprenticeship programs.
    • Professional development for artists, teaching artists, teachers, and other education providers.
    • Assessments and evaluations of arts learning.
    • Online courses or training.
    • Lectures and symposia.
    • Production, publication, and distribution of teachers’/facilitators’ guides.
    • Innovative practices in arts learning for Americans of all ages.

    You will be asked to address the anticipated results in your application. If you receive a grant, you will be asked to provide evidence of those results at the end of your project. You will need to describe the participants’ learning, the composition of the participant group, and the numbers of participants and activities, as well as the activities used to facilitate the acquisition of knowledge or skills in the arts. If you receive support through the Arts Education discipline for a standards-based project, you will be required to report on additional measurable results, including identifying specific learning outcomes, describing the assessment method, and reporting on the number of participants who demonstrated learning. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Learning. In addition to a Final Descriptive Report and Federal Financial Report, Arts Education grantees will be required to submit assessment tools with their Final Report.

  4. Livability: American communities are strengthened through the arts. Support is available for projects that incorporate the arts and design into strategies to improve the livability of communities. Livability consists of a variety of factors that contribute to the quality of life in a community such as ample opportunities for social, civic, and cultural participation; education, employment, and safety; sustainability; affordable housing, ease of transportation, and access to public buildings and facilities; and an aesthetically pleasing environment. The arts can enhance livability by providing new avenues for expression and creativity. Arts- and design-related Livability activities may include:
    • The development of plans for cultural and/or creative sector growth.
    • The enhancement of public spaces through design or new art works.
    • Arts or design activities that are intended to foster community interaction in public spaces.
    • Cultural sustainability activities that contribute to community identity and sense of place.
    • The inclusion of artists, designers, and/or arts organizations in civic engagement activities and plans and processes to improve community livability and enhance the unique characteristics of a community.
    • Innovative community-based partnerships that integrate the arts with livability efforts.

    Please note that certain types of Livability activities will require applicants to provide information in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and/or the National Historic Preservation Act. See here for more information.

    The anticipated long-term results for Livability projects are measurable community benefits, such as growth in overall levels of social and civic engagement; arts- or design-focused changes in policies, laws, and/or regulations; job and/or revenue growth for the community; and changes in in-and-out migration patterns. You will be asked to address the anticipated results in your application. If you receive a grant, you will be asked to provide evidence of those results at the end of your project. Given the nature of Livability projects, benefits are likely to emerge over time and may not be fully measureable during the period of a grant. You will need to provide evidence of progress toward achieving improved livability as appropriate to the project. Reporting requirements for Livability are different from — and more extensive than — the reporting requirements for the other outcomes. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Livability.

Innovation

The NEA recognizes that arts and design organizations are often in the forefront of innovation in their work and strongly encourages innovation within the outcomes listed above. Innovative projects are characterized as those that:

  • Are likely to prove transformative with the potential for meaningful change, whether in the development or enhancement of new or existing art forms, new approaches to the creation or presentation of art, or new ways of engaging the public with art;
  • Are distinctive, offering fresh insights and new value for their fields and/or the public through unconventional solutions; and
  • Have the potential to be shared and/or emulated, or are likely to lead to other innovations.

*                      *                        *                      *                      *

Partnerships can be valuable to the success of these projects. While not required, applicants are encouraged to consider partnerships among organizations, both in and outside of the arts, as appropriate to their project.

The Arts Endowment also is interested in projects that extend the arts to underserved populations — those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability. This is achieved in part through the use of Challenge America funds.

Please note: The Art Works category does not fund direct grants to individuals. Direct grants to individuals are offered only in the category of Literature Fellowships.

Project Reporting and Evaluation

We ask all applicants to define what they would like to achieve, how they will assess the degree to which it is achieved, and, upon completion of the project, what they have learned from their experiences. Such feedback need not entail large-scale or expensive evaluation efforts. You should do what is feasible and appropriate for your organization and project. When a grant is completed, you must submit a final report and answer questions on your achievements and how these were determined. Arts Education grantees must submit assessment tools with their Final Report. (Please note that assessment tools may be shared publicly. If your tools are proprietary and have copyrights or trademarks attached, you will be asked to note that in your Final Report.) Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for the outcome that will be selected for the proposed project: Creation, Engagement, Learning, or Livability.

Beyond the reporting requirements for all grantees, selected Art Works grantees will be asked to assist in the collection of additional information that can help the NEA determine the degree to which agency objectives were achieved. You may be contacted to provide evidence of project accomplishments including, but not limited to, work samples, community action plans, cultural asset studies, programs, reviews, relevant news clippings, and playbills. Please remember that you are required to maintain project documentation for three years following submission of your final reports.

For a random sample of grants involving the presentation of art, selected grantees will be required to conduct surveys of audience members to gauge the nature and extent of audience response to these art experiences. Grantees selected to conduct surveys will receive materials, technical assistance, and up to $1,000 in nonmatching supplemental funding from the NEA. If you are selected, you will be notified of your participation at the time of grant award.

Deadline

The application deadline for all artist community projects is March 8, 2012. (There is no August deadline.) The earliest beginning date for the Arts Endowment’s period of support is January 1, 2013.

The Art Works category provides support for projects that address the following outcomes (in bold below). You will be asked to indicate the outcome that is most relevant to your project in your application and on the application form (you also will be able to select a secondary outcome).

Creation

  • Stipends and living accommodations for professional artists where the primary purpose is to create new art.
  • The expansion of the pool of artists that encourages the participation of artists from a wide variety of aesthetic viewpoints, ethnic backgrounds, or geographic areas where the primary purpose is to create new art.
  • Access to facilities or technology to meet the needs of interdisciplinary or new genre artists where the primary purpose is to create new art.
  • Innovative approaches to serving as an incubator for the creation of art.
  • Innovative collaborations between artists and those from sectors outside of the arts (e.g., science) to create new art.

Engagement

  • Innovative uses of technology, media, or new models and activities with the surrounding community that provide the public with direct experiences with practicing artists and increase the visibility of the work of artists and the organization.
  • Innovative approaches to collaboration with outside organizations and disciplines where the primary purpose is public engagement with art.

Learning

  • Activities with the surrounding community that provide educational and related activities for children, adults, intergenerational groups, and schools. (If your project is for children and youth, see “Choosing the Right Discipline for Children and Youth Projects” to help you in your discipline selection.)
  • Residency exchange programs with artists and artist communities in other countries where the primary purpose is the acquisition of knowledge or skills in the arts.

Livability

  • The development of artist live/work spaces.
  • The enhancement of public spaces through commissioning and/or installation of works created by members of artist communities.
  • The engagement of artist communities in plans and processes to improve community livability.
  • Community-based partnerships that integrate artist communities with livability efforts.

(Applicants are strongly encouraged to contact staff if they are considering Livability as a primary outcome.)

Application Review

This category uses the agency’s traditional method of application review. Applications are submitted to the Artist Communities staff and are reviewed by a diverse group of experts in the artist community field.

Applications are reviewed on the basis of artistic excellence and artistic merit. For more detailed information on how artistic excellence and artistic merit will be evaluated, see the “Review Criteria.” You can find additional information in the “Application Review” section of the “Frequently Asked Questions.” See the “Application Calendar” for information on when we expect to announce grant awards and rejections.

Artist Community Grants, Deadline March 8

4-H Grants, Deadline July 1

2011-12 County 4-H Innovative Grant Timeline

May 31, 2011: 2010-11 grant reports due to the State 4-H Office for programs conducted Oct. 1 to Apr. 30.
May 6, 2011:
Grants applications available
July 1, 2011:
Grant applications due
September 30, 2011: Grant recipients announced
September 30, 2011: 2010-11 grant reports due to the State 4-H Office for programs conducted May 1 to Aug. 31.
May 31, 2012:
2011-12 grant reports due to the State 4-H Office for programs conducted Oct. 1 to Apr. 30.
or September 30, 2012: 2011-12 grant reports due to the State 4-H Office for programs conducted May 1 to Aug. 31.

County Innovative Grant Application Packet & Form NOW AVAILABLE!

4-H County Innovative Grants offered for 2011-12:

The Michigan 4-H Foundation Board of Trustees annually approves the distribution of competitive grant funds to encourage development of innovative
4-H program opportunities in local communities. These grants are designed to encourage program planning and participation by 4-H members and volunteers in partnership with county MSU Extension 4‑H program staff members.

We are pleased to be able to offer eight grant opportunities for the 2011-12
4-H program year.

1. Michigan 4-H Legacy Grants

The purpose of the Michigan 4-H Legacy grants is to encourage creativity and support the implementation of great ideas that promote positive youth development in communities. Grants are available for Michigan 4-H volunteers, 4-H youth members and 4-H staff members to develop a new program or initiative or to strengthen, enhance or expand a current program that’s making a difference.  Innovative local projects that build on solid principles of positive youth development and expand 4-H opportunities for young people will be considered. These grants are funded by the Michigan 4-H Legacy Fund endowment. A total of two (2) $1,000 grants are currently available.

2. Dow Chemical County 4-H Youth Conservation Council Grants

The purpose of the Dow Chemical County 4-H Youth Conservation Council Grant is to encourage and support development of county-based youth conservation councils. County youth conservation councils consist of a group of teens, ages 13 to 19, who have an interest in learning about local environmental issues and influencing public policy in their county, city or township governments. Applicants for the Dow Chemical County 4-H Youth Conservation Council mini-grant must be willing to engage youth representing multi-ethnic communities in this leadership opportunity that provides environmental stewardship education and advocacy and also encourages the use of technology as a learning, research and presentation tool. Currently five (5) grants valued at $1,000 in training, curriculum and financial support are available. Each grantee will receive $750 in cash to develop a county-based 4-H youth conservation council and $250 in required training scholarships and handbook for developing a local council. These grants are funded by the Dow Chemical Company Foundation.

3. 4-H On-Target County Grant

The On-Target County Grant is designed to help county 4-H Shooting Sports programs enhance existing programs, develop a new program or offer a special experience related to 4-H Shooting Sports. Thanks to the generous support of Thomas Cobb, former Michigan 4-H Foundation president, counties have an opportunity to apply for funds in this area each year. Two (2) $500 grants are available.

4. NorthStar Cooperative 4-H Dairy Science Grant

The NorthStar Cooperative 4-H Dairy Science grants offer opportunity for 4-H youth and volunteers working in 4-H Dairy Science to strengthen existing county 4-H dairy science programs or use as seed money to develop new innovations in the way 4-H Dairy Science learning takes place for young people. Thanks to the generous support of the members of NorthStar Cooperative, Inc., county or state 4-H groups have opportunity to apply for funds to advance their learning. Two (2) $500 grants are available.

5. OMEDA Youth Tractor Safety Education Grants

Helping families living and working on farms develop youth tractor safety practices is the purpose of the Ohio-Michigan Equipment Dealers Association (OMEDA) grants for county MSU Extension educators. 4-H youth staff members are encouraged to partner with their county MSUE agricultural educators and volunteers to offer learning experiences that promote safe tractor operations. These grants are funded by a gift from the Ohio-Michigan Equipment Dealers Association. Two (2) $250 grant awards are currently available.

6. Ousterhout Regional or District Teen Leadership Training Grant

This grant is offered every other year to provide support for the addition of a teen leadership training focus to any regional or district 4-H volunteer training event. The grant can be used to provide scholarships for teens to attend a relevant regional or district volunteer training event, or to support the addition of a specific teen leadership focus to a regional or district event. This grant is made possible by the Ousterhout Regional Endowment and the Turner-Outsterhout Endowment for Teen Leadership Training. One (1) $500 grant is available.

7. Michigan 4-H Outbound International Travel Grants (New This Year!)

These grants are awarded to 4-H youth who have applied and been accepted to travel as part of a Michigan 4-H sponsored outbound international travel experience such as Labo, IFYE, Poland, Belize or other Michigan 4-H sponsored international travel opportunities. These travel scholarships are provided with support from the Michigan Division, Woman’s National Farm and Garden Association, raised annually through their International Tea; and the Michigan 4-H International Endowment Fund created with gifts from Michigan 4-H IFYE alumni and other donors. Four (4) $500 travel scholarships are available for 2011 travel experiences.

Those receiving scholarships will be required to complete the following as part of their scholarship requirements:

  • Write an article (1-2 pages or more) on one or more concepts learned through the travel program.  Submit at least two good photos with the article (completed by September 15).

  • Develop a display poster on your experience.  This should include photos and information telling about your experience. (Completed by October 1).

  • Give a talk/report to two or more groups in your county.  These may include 4-H groups, service clubs (i.e. Kiwanis, Rotary), grange, school classrooms, etc. (completed by December 1).

  • A scholarship winner must attend and do a presentation at the Woman’s National Farm and Garden Association International Tea in the first September after their return.

  • Scholarship applications are only made available to 4-H members approved for international travel each 4-H program year.

8. 4-H Educational Garden Grant

The purpose of 4-H Educational Garden Grants is to stimulate the creation of local 4-H educational gardens in Michigan. This program will increase the opportunities for high quality and high visibility 4-H programming in communities, will create a connection for youth and 4-H volunteers to resources from the Michigan 4-H Children’s Garden and will encourage creative 4-H volunteer leadership in communities.  These grants are made possible by the Albert A. Albright Endowment for Plant Science and Gardening Education. Currently two (2) $1,000 grants are available. An award could be made in subsequent years to the same project. Other requirements are:

  • Gardens must be in public places but not necessarily on public property. 4-H centers, YMCAs and other community centers, fairgrounds, places of worship, parks and schools are examples of suitable places.

  • The garden must use the 4-H name and must follow appropriate use of the 4-H emblem as stated online at http://www.national4-hheadquarters.gov/4h_name.htm. The garden planners/managers will commit to a set of educational programs that involve 4-H members and other children with the garden for a minimum number of years. The curator of the Michigan 4-H Children’s Garden and/or designee will visit any funded local 4-H garden at least once in the initiation phase and on future occasions as arranged.

  • Every effort will be made to link the local 4-H educational gardens with the Michigan 4-H Children’s Gardens through technology and on-site visits to the MSU campus gardens.

  • For creative ideas, we encourage you to visit the Michigan 4-H Children’s Garden at http://www.4hgarden.msu.edu or contact Norman Lownds, Curator of the Michigan 4-H Children’s Garden at Michigan State University at lownds@msu.edu or (517) 355-5191, ext. 1-349.

4-H Grants, Deadline July 1

Young Leaders – Arts & Culture, Grant Applications Due April 14

Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs
The Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs Announces the 2011 New Leaders Art Council of Michigan (NLACM) Retention and Engagement Grant Program
Tuesday, March 15, 2011
John Bracey
517.241.3972

The New Leaders Arts Council of Michigan (NLACM) is proud to announce this grant program tailored to young leaders in Michigan for arts and culture projects. The NLACM is a young leaders advisory council of the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs (MCACA). The NLACM is dedicated to promoting the Arts and Culture in Michigan, and is focused on supporting other young leaders. The NLACM works to:

* Increase young people’s access to arts and culture programs within Michigan.
* Advise MCACA on issues relating to young people’s participation in, access to, and develop­ment through arts and culture in Michigan.
* Support program, projects, and initiatives of MCACA.
* Promote the value of arts and culture to a community.

This grant program was designed by NLACM to provide opportunities for young people to engage each other and their communities. Grants of up to $2,500 will be awarded in support of projects or collaborations focusing on the community engagement and retention of young people in Michigan. The grant guidelines and application instructions can be found at www.themedc.org/arts under “Grant Program.” Deadline to apply is April 14, 2011, for projects that take place June 1, 2011, through September 30, 2011.

This program uses donations from the MCACA tax check-off fund. In 2009, Michigan taxpayers gave nearly $28,000 out of their returns.

For more information contact Carolyn Damstra, Program Manager, damstrac@michigan.org, (517) 241-3968 or (517) 241-4011.

Program FAQ

Grant Guidelines

Young Leaders – Arts & Culture, Grant Applications Due April 14

Realize Science Technology Grant, Due March 31

Realize Science Technology Grant

The Realize Science Technology Grant for Agriculture in the Classroom will award $5,000 worth of cutting edge science education equipment to K-12 teachers across the U.S. this spring. Those awarded the grant will receive new hand-held video microscopes with software to take still pictures, video, time lapse movies, etc. This grant is open to any teachers in the United States who integrates agriculture in their classroom.

Deadline: March 31, 2011

Maximum Award: Value of $5000
For more information, contact Elise Alden 877-395-1001, <ealden@strscopes.com> or visit <http://schooltr.com/Teacher_Resources/realize_science_grant.html>.

Realize Science Technology Grant, Due March 31