Invasive Species Control Grants, Pre-Proposals Due June 13

Grant Post May 2, 2018

Michigan Invasive Species Grant Program (MISGP)
The Departments of Natural Resources, Environmental Quality and Agriculture and Rural Development work together to address strategic issues of prevention, detection, eradication, and control for both terrestrial and aquatic invasive species in Michigan.

Projects must support the overalls goals of the MISGP:
• Prevent new invasive species introductions.
• Strengthen statewide invasive species early detection and response network.
• Limit the dispersal of recently confirmed invasive species.
• Manage and control widespread, long-established invasive species.

Eligibility:
• Local, state*, federal or tribal units of government
• Non-profit organizations
• Universities
*State agencies should contact the MISGP contact prior to preparing an application.

The minimum grant amount is $25,000 with maximum grant amounts between $60,000 and $400,000 depending on the type of project.

Reposted as a public service. Contact us for more information on this program. To learn more about GFA please visit us at http://gfa.tc.

Invasive Species Control Grants, Pre-Proposals Due June 13

Great Lakes Fishery Trust, Deadline August 23

The Great Lakes Fishery Trust (GLFT) is now accepting grant proposals under its Access to the Great Lakes Fishery funding category. Proposals must be submitted by 5:00 PM Tuesday, August 23, 2016.

The GLFT’s Access to the Great Lakes Fishery grant category focuses on significantly increasing access to the Great Lakes fishery for shore-based angling and tribal commercial fishing. Up to $500,000 is available for access projects in 2016.

The GLFT supports its access goals through a combination of competitive and funder-directed grantmaking. Supported activities may include:

  1. Construction of new access sites
  2. Upgrades and renovations to existing access sites
  3. Engineering and feasibility studies for proposed access sites
  4. Land acquisition to support subsequent access site development
  5. Communication and outreach efforts regarding existing shore-based angling opportunities

Contact us for more information! To learn more about GFA visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

Great Lakes Fishery Trust, Deadline August 23

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Funding, Deadline Sept. 28

This Request for Applications (RFA) solicits applications from eligible entities for grants and/or cooperative agreements to be awarded pursuant to the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Action Plan II ( http://greatlakesrestoration.us/actionplan/pdfs/glri-action-plan-2.pdf).  This RFA is EPA’s major competitive grant funding opportunity under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (“GLRI” or “Initiative”) for FY 2015 and is one of several funding opportunities available through federal agencies under the GLRI.  Applications are requested for projects within the five categories listed below.

Invasive Species Prevention (EPA-R5-GL2015-ISP)

The Great Lakes remain vulnerable to the introduction of new invasive species. A number of pathways, such as ballast water from commercial shipping, are being addressed through regional and national programs. However, innovative approaches are still needed to reduce the risk from a variety of pathways including, but not limited to, movement through canals and waterways; accidental contamination of nursery, water garden, and live bait products; uninformed use of invasive species in landscaping and water gardens; and internet sales of invasive species. EPA expects to provide approximately $2.5 million for approximately 5 to 8 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $500,000 that block pathways of invasive species introductions into the Great Lakes ecosystem.

Projects submitted in this category must implement activities that actively reduce the risk of introduction of invasive species, as opposed to projects that perform basic research or “proof of concept” testing of prevention methodologies/technologies.

Invasive Species Control (EPA-R5-GL2015-ISC)

Progress toward restoring the Great Lakes has been significantly undermined by the effects of non-native invasive species. However, many invasive species can be controlled to reduce their impacts on the Great Lakes ecosystem. There is an ongoing need for enhancing the capacity for managing invasive species in the Great. Funding for on-the-ground and in-the-water control projects can greatly assist ecological restoration and help create long-term stewardship programs. Applicants are responsible for the maintenance of these significantly improved project sites after the initial funding period has ended.

EPA expects to provide approximately $5,200,000 for approximately 8 to 12 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $650,000 that control invasive species and initiate long-term stewardship of project sites.  Projects submitted in this category must implement on-the-ground and/or in-the-water invasive species control actions and result in acres of invasive species controlled, rather than perform basic research or “proof of concept” testing of control methodologies/technologies. Up to 20% of the federal share of the project budget may be used to retreat areas that were previously treated by GLRI-funded projects.

Urban Watershed Management Implementation (EPA-R5-GL2015-UWM)

Nearshore water quality has increasingly become degraded, as evidenced by excessive nutrients; harmful algal blooms; mats of Cladophora on beaches; avian botulism; and beach closings. Causes of these problems include excessive nutrient loadings from both point and nonpoint sources, bacteria and other pathogens, development and shoreline hardening, agricultural practices, failing septic systems, improper grey-water discharge, increased frequency and intensity of storm events due to climate change, and invasive species. Nonpoint sources are now the primary contributors of many pollutants to the Great Lakes and their tributaries. Implementation of best management practices addressing those sources can have multiple benefits, including simultaneous reductions in runoff of soils, nutrients, pesticides, and other nonpoint source pollutants.

EPA expects to provide approximately $2,700,000 for approximately 6 to 10 projects to reduce nonpoint source pollution from urban areas to the Great Lakes.  The maximum amount of federal funds that will be awarded for any project in this category is $500,000. For the purposes of this announcement, an eligible urban watershed is defined as including urban and downtown areas, city neighborhoods, suburban municipalities, and exurban communities and unincorporated areas characterized by encroaching urban sprawl where the urban land use has a documented impact on water quality. Proposed project locations must be located within the same HUC12 subwatershed where the documented water quality problem occurs.

Projects submitted in this category must address an urban nonpoint source problem. Proposals are limited to projects implementing an urban component(s) of existing watershed-based plans that are consistent with the components outlined in EPA’s Nine Elements Guidance. Such plans are designed to address documented nonpoint source-related water quality problems and to help prevent future nonpoint source water quality-related problems. The plans are based upon sound science and evaluation techniques; have measurable outcomes; are developed with stakeholder/public involvement; and leverage additional resources. See the following links for approved Nine-Element Watershed Management Plans or information about the plans:

•  Michigan: http://www.michigan.gov/deq/0,1607,7-135-3313_3682_3714—,00.html (Follow the NPS  Approved and Pending Watershed Plans link.)

Agricultural Watershed Management Implementation (EPA-R5-GL2015-AWM)

Nearshore water quality has become degraded, as evidenced by excessive nutrients; harmful algal blooms; mats of Cladophora on beaches; avian botulism; and beach closings. Causes of these problems include excessive nutrient loadings from both point and nonpoint sources, bacteria and other pathogens, development and shoreline hardening, agricultural practices, failing septic systems, improper grey-water discharge, increased frequency and intensity of storm events due to climate change, and invasive species. Nonpoint sources are now the primary contributors of nutrients and sediments to the Great Lakes and their tributaries. Implementation of best management practices addressing those sources can have multiple benefits, including decreasing surface runoff with simultaneous reductions in runoff of soils, nutrients, pesticides, and other nonpoint source pollutants.

EPA expects to provide approximately $3,000,000 for approximately 6 to 8 projects to reduce nonpoint source pollution to the Great Lakes.  The maximum amount of federal funds that will be awarded for any project in this category is $500,000.  Projects submitted in this category must be projects implementing agricultural best management practices or management measures from watershed-based plans that are consistent with the components outlined in EPA’s Nine Elements Guidance. Such plans are designed to address documented nonpoint source-related water quality problems and to help prevent future agricultural nonpoint source water quality-related problems. The plans are based upon sound science and evaluation techniques; have measurable outcomes; are developed with stakeholder/public involvement; and leverage additional resources. See the following links for approved Nine-Element Watershed Management Plans or information about the plans:
•  Michigan: http://www.michigan.gov/deq/0,1607,7-135-3313_3682_3714—,00.html (Follow the NPS  Approved and Pending Watershed Plans link.)

Maumee River Watershed Nutrient Prevention Pilot Project (EPA-R5-GL2015-MNP)

This pilot initiative seeks to increase the longevity and cost-effectiveness of nutrient discharge reduction measures in the Maumee River watershed by investing in permanent land conservation easements2 and other measures that support long-term nutrient reduction. EPA expects to provide approximately $1,000,000 for up to 2 projects in this category.

Funding/Awards: Approximately $13.9 million may be awarded in total as grants and/or cooperative agreements under this RFA for up to about 40 projects in the five categories listed above, contingent upon funding availability, the quality of applications received and other applicable considerations.  However, EPA expressly reserves the right to make no awards under a particular category or to adjust the number of awards originally anticipated under a specific category.

Proposed projects must be limited to the project duration identified for the respective categories.  Awards may be fully or incrementally funded.  All incrementally funded awards will be subject to the availability of funding, future appropriations, satisfactory performance of work, and other applicable considerations.  Applicants may submit applications under each funding opportunity number listed above and multiple applications per funding opportunity number, provided that each application is for a different project, is submitted separately, and each application cannot address more than one category.

  • Monday, September 28, 2015 –Applications must be submitted to EPA through http://www.grants.gov by 10:59 p.m. Central Daylight Time / 11:59 p.m., Eastern Daylight Time.  See Section IV for further submission information.
  • October 2015 (tentative) – EPA will begin notifying finalists.
  • December 2015 (tentative) – EPA will begin making official awards.
Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Funding, Deadline Sept. 28

Dam Management Grants, Deadline Nov. 15

The Department of Natural Resources has announced its Dam Management Grant Program is now open for proposals. The second year of this grant opportunity will provide $350,000 in Fiscal Year 2014 to address Michigan’s failing dam infrastructure through the funding of dam removals and critical repair/maintenance.

The DNR’s Dam Management Grant Program is focused on the growing issue of abandoned, unused or hazardous dams in Michigan. The purpose of the program is to provide funding and technical assistance to local and state units of government, non-profit groups and individuals to manage dam removals or repair/major maintenance projects that will enhance aquatic resources and fishing opportunities, and also to reduce infrastructure costs and improve public safety in Michigan.

There were six recipients as part of the Dam Management Grant Program’s first year, when $2.35 million was granted.

Dam Management Grants, Deadline Nov. 15

GLRI Grants, Deadline Aug. 14

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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today issued a Request for Applications soliciting applications from states, tribes, local governments, universities, nonprofit organizations, and other eligible organizations for Great Lakes Restoration Initiative grants and cooperative agreements to be awarded as part of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, http://glri.us

EPA will award approximately $9.5 million under this request for applications for about 20 projects, contingent on the availability of appropriations, the quality of applications received and other applicable considerations. This RFA is EPA’s major competitive grant funding opportunity under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative for fiscal year 2013. It is one of several funding opportunities available through federal agencies under GLRI. Applications are requested for projects within the following four categories:

  • Reducing exposure to toxic substances from fish consumption
  • Invasive species prevention and control
  • Lake Erie Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative
  • Facilitation of Lakewide Action and Management Plan (LAMP) stakeholder forums

A webinar explaining the grant application process will be held at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on Tuesday, July 30.  Register for the webinar: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/948263881

GLRI Grants, Deadline Aug. 14

Tribal Wildlife Grant Program, Due Sept. 3

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Tribal Wildlife Grants are used to provide technical and financial assistance to Tribes for the development and implementation of programs that benefit fish and wildlife resources and their habitat. Activities may include, but are not limited to, planning for wildlife and habitat conservation, fish and wildlife conservation and management actions, fish and wildlife related laboratory and field research, natural history studies, habitat mapping, field surveys and population monitoring, habitat preservation, conservation easements, and public education that is relevant to the project. The funds may be used for salaries, equipment, consultant services, subcontracts, acquisitions and travel. Previously funded Tribal Wildlife Grant projects range from comprehensive surveys of plants, fish and wildlife, to habitat and fish restoration, to development of new resource management plans and techniques.

Expected Number of Awards:     23
Estimated Total Program Funding:     $3,925,000
Award Ceiling:     $200,000
Award Floor:     $15,000

Contact us for more information!

Photo: WikiCommons

Tribal Wildlife Grant Program, Due Sept. 3

Great Lakes Habitat Restoration/Conservation, Deadline Feb. 1, 2013

The goal of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative is to target the most significant environmental problems in the Great Lakes ecosystem.  As part of this initiative, the two bird habitat joint ventures that are in the Great Lakes watershed – the Upper Mississippi and Great Lakes Region Joint Venture and the Atlantic Coast Joint Venture – will be working with the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration programs in the Midwest and Northeast Regions of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to competitively fund state and other partner projects for long-term habitat restoration, enhancement or protection, for conservation of native Great Lakes fish and wildlife populations, particularly migratory birds.  Preference will be given to activities that help meet the habitat goals of the Upper Mississippi River and Great Lakes Region Joint Venture Implementation Plan or the Lower Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Plain (BCR 13) Bird Conservation Region Plan, other relevant bird conservation plans, and State Wildlife Action Plans.

Ranking and selection of projects will be based on information provided in the application.  Highest consideration will be given to projects with several of the following attributes, in priority order:  1) Benefits to priority bird species, habitats and geographic areas identified in applicable Joint Venture bird conservation plans; 2) readiness to begin project (to ensure completion within one year of the grant award date); 3) long-term duration of resource benefits; 4) involvement of two or more partners including state partners; 5) higher ratio of non-Federal match to grant request than the required 25% minimum; 6) importance as a catalyst to future conservation actions or as part of a larger set of connected conservation lands or actions in the landscape and 7) documented benefits to federally-listed species, and/or those identified as highest priorities in the relevant State Wildlife Action Plan.  It is highly recommended that applicants consult with the appropriate joint venture coordinator prior to submitting an application to ensure that adequate and relevant information is provided.

Special Note:  GLRI Joint Venture funds will be targeted towards improving fish and wildlife habitat and their populations within watersheds of “Areas of Concern” (AOC; (http://www.epa.gov/greatlakes/aoc/) wherever possible, as a coordinated effort between the Service’s Coastal, Joint Venture, and Partners for Fish and Wildlife Programs.  In addition, projects that will result in a reduction of excessive phosphorus inputs into a watershed should be highlighted.  Though proposals within AOCs and/or those that will reduce phosphorus are encouraged, it is not a requirement for funding.

Up to $1 million in funds may be available during fiscal year 2013.  Grant requests between $25,000 and $290,000 will be accepted.   We expect to announce the awards in May 2013.

Matching contributions may take the form of cash, goods, services, or land value and must equal at least 25% of the requested Federal funds; permanent, non-reimbursable, and dedicated to a project; and documented by a signed letter of commitment from an authorized representative of the match provider in the application.  The letter of commitment must detail the amount of matching funds or value of donated land and/or services. Land as match must have a current (less than 1 year) appraised value. This program uses grant agreements as the funding mechanism.

Eligible applicants for this competitive grant program include state fish and wildlife agencies and other non-federal conservation agencies or organizations that provide at least 25% of the grant request (Federal share) as non-federal match for habitat restoration, enhancement and protection activities.  (Note: grants cannot be awarded to outside entities for restoration or enhancement work on Federal lands).  Projects must be within the U.S. watershed of the Great Lakes as defined by the U.S. EPA (links to maps of the Great Lakes Watershed and Lower Great Lakes Watershed in NY and PA) within states bordering the Great Lakes (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin). A Federal interest will be attached to real property interests acquired with grant funds or contributed as match and must be titled to, or held by, either the Grantee or an approved Subgrantee.

An eligible proposal is a plan of action supported by grant and partner funds to conserve habitats for migratory birds and other wildlife through acquisition (including fee title, permanent conservation easements and donations of real property interests), restoration and/or enhancement that contains a grant request between $25,000 and $290,000 and matching contributions of at least 25% of total grant request (Federal share), with a target completion date within one year of the date of award.  Grant awards may only be used for activities that begin after the grant agreement is signed – this grant program is not eligible for reimbursement of completed or ongoing projects.

Contact us for more information!

Great Lakes Habitat Restoration/Conservation, Deadline Feb. 1, 2013

Fisheries Innovation Fund, Deadline Nov. 26

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation has announced the third round of grants available from its Fisheries Innovation Fund.

The fund fosters the design and implementation of new and inventive approaches to ensure sustainable fisheries in the United States. The fund is made possible through a partnership with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and additional support from the Walton Family Foundation and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

The fund will consider applications from all U.S. fisheries, commercial or recreational, looking to foster innovation as they strive to achieve sustainability. Successful proposals will develop innovative approaches to build capacity of fishing communities to improve their sustainability; promote full utilization of annual catch limits and minimize by catch of overfished and endangered species; or improve the quality, quantity, and timeliness of fisheries-dependent data used for science, management, and professional purposes.

NFWF is investigating the possibility of incorporating a loan-making component into the Fisheries Innovation Fund for future rounds so applicants can request capital to support activities or acquisitions that would lead to increased profitability for their sectors, with the understanding that these funds eventually will be paid back. To this end, project proposals to help NFWF develop this loan-making arm will be considered.

Applications may be submitted by individuals, organizations, and agencies (excluding employees of the U.S. Federal government) working on projects to ensure sustainable U.S. fisheries.

Applications for funding for land or easement acquisition, facility construction, political advocacy, lobbying, or litigation will not be considered.

In 2013, the fund expects to award $1.35 million to approximately fifteen projects. The majority of awards will fall in the range of $50,000 to $200,000. However, upper or lower limits to award size are not specified. Matching contributions (both cash and in-kind) are preferred but not required.

Fisheries Innovation Fund, Deadline Nov. 26

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, Due May 24

Up to approximately $20 million may be awarded under this RFA for about 100 projects contingent on the quality of applications received, funding availability and other applicable considerations. Applications are requested for projects identified in the RFA within the following four GLRI focus areas:

1.Toxic Substances and Areas of Concern, including reduction of toxic substances (through pollution prevention or other means) in the most polluted areas in the Great Lakes;

2.Invasive Species, including efforts to institute a “zero tolerance policy” toward new invasions;

3.Nearshore Health and Nonpoint Source Pollution, including a targeted geographic focus on high priority watersheds and reducing polluted runoff from urban, suburban and agricultural sources; and

4.Accountability, Education, Monitoring, Evaluation, Communication and Partnerships, including climate change resiliency and strategic partnerships through Lakewide Management Plans.

Eligible Applicants:

Governmental entities, including state agencies, interstate agencies, Indian tribes, local governments as defined in 40 CFR Section 31.3, institutions of higher learning (e.g., colleges and universities subject to 40 CFR Part 30 or 40 CFR Part 31), and nonprofit organizations are eligible to apply for funding under this RFA.

Contact us for more information!

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, Due May 24

Water Quality Grants, NOI Due Sept. 7

Nearly $4 million in water quality grants available!

The DEQ today announced nearly $4 million in available grants to protect, restore and manage watersheds.

The grant program is open to state agencies, local governments, and nonprofit organizations. Proposals are requested for watershed management planning projects as well as projects that implement previously approved watershed management plans.

Funding for the program includes approximately $1 million from the Clean Michigan Initiative’s Nonpoint Source Pollution Control Grants and approximately $2.9 million from Section 319 of the federal Clean Water Act.

Grant awards are contingent on the sale of Clean Michigan Initiative general obligation bonds to support these projects and the appropriation of funding by the Michigan Legislature and
U.S. Congress.

Notices of Intent are due Sept. 7. Full applications from invited applicants are due Oct. 19.

Water Quality Grants, NOI Due Sept. 7