MDNR Invasive Species Grants, Deadline June 15

In the first two years of this program, more than $7.6 million in grant funding has gone to support invasive species education, control and management through 16 Cooperative Invasive Species Management Areas, as well as targeted projects to control invasive Phragmites, Eurasian watermilfoil, European frog-bit, feral swine and oak wilt.

“Preventing invasive species from being introduced to or gaining a foothold in Michigan is of the greatest importance to protecting our world-class natural resources and outdoor recreation opportunities,” said DNR Director Bill Moritz. “We are eager to provide this vital funding to our community partners who are just as strongly committed to battling these land and water invaders.”

Administered by the DNR, the Michigan Invasive Species Grant Program targets four key objectives:

  • Preventing new introductions of invasive species through outreach and education.
  • Monitoring for new invasive species as well as expansions of current invasive species.
  • Managing and controlling key colonized species in a strategic manner.
  • Responding to and conducting eradication efforts for new findings and range expansions.

Important program dates

Local, federal and tribal units of government, nonprofit organizations and universities may apply for funding to support invasive species projects conducted in Michigan. For this 2016 funding cycle, pre-proposals will be accepted through June 15 and requested full proposals must be submitted by Sept. 15.

Grant requests for 2016 projects can range from a minimum of $25,000 to a maximum of $400,000. Applicants must commit to provide at least 10 percent of the total project cost in the form of a local match. Proposals with match levels above 10 percent will receive higher ranking.

Competitive applications will outline clear objectives, propose significant ecological benefits, demonstrate diverse collaboration and show strong community support. Contact us for more information. Learn more about GFA at our website: http://gfa.tc.

MDNR Invasive Species Grants, Deadline June 15

GLRI Grants, Deadline Aug. 14

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today issued a Request for Applications soliciting applications from states, tribes, local governments, universities, nonprofit organizations, and other eligible organizations for Great Lakes Restoration Initiative grants and cooperative agreements to be awarded as part of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, http://glri.us

EPA will award approximately $9.5 million under this request for applications for about 20 projects, contingent on the availability of appropriations, the quality of applications received and other applicable considerations. This RFA is EPA’s major competitive grant funding opportunity under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative for fiscal year 2013. It is one of several funding opportunities available through federal agencies under GLRI. Applications are requested for projects within the following four categories:

  • Reducing exposure to toxic substances from fish consumption
  • Invasive species prevention and control
  • Lake Erie Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative
  • Facilitation of Lakewide Action and Management Plan (LAMP) stakeholder forums

A webinar explaining the grant application process will be held at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on Tuesday, July 30.  Register for the webinar: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/948263881

GLRI Grants, Deadline Aug. 14

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, Due May 24

Up to approximately $20 million may be awarded under this RFA for about 100 projects contingent on the quality of applications received, funding availability and other applicable considerations. Applications are requested for projects identified in the RFA within the following four GLRI focus areas:

1.Toxic Substances and Areas of Concern, including reduction of toxic substances (through pollution prevention or other means) in the most polluted areas in the Great Lakes;

2.Invasive Species, including efforts to institute a “zero tolerance policy” toward new invasions;

3.Nearshore Health and Nonpoint Source Pollution, including a targeted geographic focus on high priority watersheds and reducing polluted runoff from urban, suburban and agricultural sources; and

4.Accountability, Education, Monitoring, Evaluation, Communication and Partnerships, including climate change resiliency and strategic partnerships through Lakewide Management Plans.

Eligible Applicants:

Governmental entities, including state agencies, interstate agencies, Indian tribes, local governments as defined in 40 CFR Section 31.3, institutions of higher learning (e.g., colleges and universities subject to 40 CFR Part 30 or 40 CFR Part 31), and nonprofit organizations are eligible to apply for funding under this RFA.

Contact us for more information!

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, Due May 24

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, Due April 11

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative
2011 Request for Applications

Announcement Number: EPA-R5-GL2011-1

EPA is soliciting applications for grants and cooperative agreements to be awarded as part of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. Up to $40 million may be awarded under this Request for Applications for about 150 projects, contingent on the availability of appropriations, the quality of applications received, and other applicable considerations.

This RFA is EPA’s major competitive grant funding opportunity under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative for FY2011 and is one of several funding opportunities available through federal agencies under the GLRI. The RFA requests applications for projects in the categories listed below:

Toxic Substances and Areas of Concern

  • Delist Areas of Concern/Beneficial Use Impairments
  • Pollution Prevention and Toxics Reduction

Invasive Species

  • Invasive Species Control
  • Invasive Species Prevention
  • Early Warning System for Invasive Species

Nearshore Health and Nonpoint Source Pollution

  • Project Implementation to Make Beaches Safer
  • Reduce Impairments and Stressors of Nearshore Waters
  • Watershed Remediation
  • Green Marinas and Ports
  • Areal Extent and Duration of Harmful Algal Blooms

Accountability, Education, Monitoring, Evaluation, Communication, and Partnerships

  • Education and Outreach
  • Implement Lakewide Management Plan Projects

EPA will host two webinars to explain the RFA and answer your questions. There is no charge to participate, but you must preregister.
* Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 10 a.m. – noon CST
Registration Web Link: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/778176848
* Thursday, March 17, 2011, 10 a.m. – noon CDT
Registration Web Link: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/214473136

Submit an application
Applications must be submitted to EPA via http://apply.glnpo.net/ by noon Central time on April 11, 2011. See Section IV for further submission information.

Download the Request for Applications [PDF 248 Kb, 53 pages, rev. 2-25-2011]

Posted Date: February 25, 2011

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, Due April 11

Great Lakes Protection Grant Program, Rolling Deadline

The Fund welcomes preproposals for projects that identify a specific improvement to the health of the Great Lakes ecosystem and have a pragmatic plan to produce those improvements. The Fund supports projects that produce results for the entire basin ecosystem, are carried out by collaborative teams, and tackle issues that have not generally been addressed at basin scale.

Such issues presently include:

Additional projects are sought to expand work in these areas.

All ideas are welcome, provided that they are consistent with the Fund’s general funding guidelines. Click here to learn more about our general funding guidelines.

Support can be in the form of grants, loans, program related investments, or other investment mechanisms. The Fund can support a wide array of project ideas are welcome and preproposals may be submitted at any time.

All proposed projects must meet certain guidelines to be eligible for funding. The ultimate criterion used to select projects is the anticipated benefit to the health of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Projects must identify a significant, tangible ecological outcome and a pragmatic plan to achieve it. Proposals should identify the expected outcome of the work to be undertaken as precisely as possible. Additional project design resources are available on our web site.

Projects must also lead to benefits for the entire Great Lakes ecosystem. The Fund prefers to support projects that take concrete actions to achieve basin-wide ecological results. Support for activities such as conferences, environmental education, and basic scientific or policy research will be considered for support only when they are part of a broader, regional action strategy that is designed to impact the entire ecosystem.

Projects must supplement existing efforts to protect and restore the health of the Great Lakes ecosystem. The Fund will not support projects that duplicate ongoing initiatives or replace government funds.

The Fund also considers the following principles when evaluating requests for support:

  • Projects should be driven by environmental results, take concrete actions and have system-wide impact.
  • Projects should be collaborative in nature and create partnerships that reflect the range of interests in the Great Lakes basin.
  • Projects should anticipate and prevent impacts on the health of the ecosystem, rather than attempt to correct environmental problems only after they have occurred.
  • Projects should develop solutions that improve both the environmental and economic health of the basin ecosystem. The Fund is interested in supporting efforts that promote both environmental and economic sustainability.
  • Projects must be based on sound science, should utilize the results of existing research, and apply the skills of the basin’s scientific community. Just as the Fund will not support basic research that is not a part of an action strategy, the Fund will not support actions that are not based in rigorous, scientific analysis.
  • The Fund does not provide general operating support and does not support lobbying or litigation.

The Great Lakes Protection Fund can support a wide variety of applicants. Non-profit organizations (including environmental organizations, trade associations, and universities), for-profit businesses, government agencies, and individuals are eligible for Fund support. Successful applicants must maintain open access to certain project data, records, and information.

All applicants must comply with the Fund’s general funding guidelines, show that the proposed work has clear public benefit and that any related financial benefits will accrue to the public good. Government agencies must show that Fund support is not being used to replace or duplicate public funds.

Refer also to frequently asked questions about our Funding Guidelines.

Source – http://www.glpf.org/

Great Lakes Protection Grant Program, Rolling Deadline

Phragmites

This invasive species is rapidly gaining a foothold along our shorelines, and is already overpowering the Saginaw Bay area. GFA’s mapping specialists are available to work with species identification experts to help you prepare an accurate and comprehensive map of any current infestations along your shorelines. As a surveying contractor for the US Army Corps of Engineers, GFA also has the experience to assist you in preparing survey and mapping information that may be required by USACE permits.

Beaver Island has put together a very good video on the topic, which you may view here:
http://www.peaine.org/environment/phragmites/video/

The MDEQ website has a page on phragmites control and management:
http://www.michigan.gov/deq/0,1607,7-135-3313_3677_8314-178183–,00.html
If you are planning on chemical treatment, applications are due August 15.

A MDEQ workshop is scheduled for June 6 in Traverse City. If you are interested in GFA’s phragmites mapping services, please contact Heather Brady, hhbrady@gourdiefraser.com.

Phragmites